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PRICE 10 CENTS _. w _--.,_.__ , «,.— .^..,. w $5.00 PER YEAR 

TAX PAYERS WEEKLY 



SAN FRANCISCO 





ULY 1, 1922 



LOS ANGELES 




EARLY s.W FRANCISCO (NO. 18). THE HISTORIC DOUBLE CELEBRATION IN THE PLAZA, "81 

VIEW OF PORTSMOUTH SQUARE i The present Plan), July 4. 1851. Depicting the atlng the first Fourth of 

July following the acceptance of the first Constitution of California, adopted September '■>. 18B0. The view- is taken from K 
Btreet on the east side of Portsmouth Square, then the popular gathering place of the city, where all big outdoor general gath- 
erings; were held. The buildings In the background face the present Hrennan place, named after C. J. Brennan. former Mayor 
of the city The center building is the home of the famous Monumental Engine Company, which existed and was used as an 
engine house down to its destruction in the conflagration of April. 1906. The building! are typical of the architecture of the 
'4H period. The house on the extreme right with a streaming American flag is the Court. The Postorflce is the smallest 

building on Brennan Place; the second entrance on the extreme right of the building is occupied by the lithographer. The 
Postoffice of thai day would barely furnish a stamp window for the present big Postofllce. 




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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




vol. Jim Q ( 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY I, 1922 



MfV^Uh 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
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NOTICE^The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
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— We should not talk so loudly about the blessings of Ameri- 
canism until we lower the murder record of 15,000 a year several 
notches. 

— Now that San Francisco has got through entertaining the chief 
conventions, suppose we take up the ever live topic of reducing 
our impossible taxes. 

— If Police Chief Dan O'Brien does not stop crowding our genial 
Mayor out of all the newspaper pictures, he may get in trouble. 
Can it be that the Chief is ambitious to be mayor himself? 

* * * 

— Donald D. Stewart, unfrocked Presbyterian preacher, is ac- 
cused of bigamy and all-around rascality. But why make columns 
of sordid criminal happenings when brief paragraphs would be more 
than enough? 

•Y ¥ ^ 

— Our fine Civic Center made such an impression on the Kansas 
City Shriner Mayor that he wants to copy it at home. Fine idea. 
But please issue no more tax-exempt bonds for civic display. There 
are already eleven billions afloat. 

— Supreme Justice Taft has been received at Buckingham Palace 
by King George like a royalty. Now look out for indignant speeches 
a yard long from the Southern demagogues playing small party 
politics in the United States Senate. 

* * * 

— Union mining strikers in Illinois are seizing coal mines and han- 
dling mine guards and non-union workers like prisoners of war. 
If our State governments cannot protect life and" property the Fed- 
eral power will surely crowd them out. 

* * * 

— Judging by the way the police chiefs talked at the recent con- 
• vention in this city, they think the police are the bulwarks of popu- 
lar safety. They need to learn that our courts of justice should 
be the safeguards of life and property. 

* * * 

— The Water and Power Act, which proposes to place a lien of 
$500,000,000 on every foot of property in the State, and give live 
politicians in Sacramento the handling of the money, is Socialistic 
madness, worthy of the brain of a Lenine. 



— Morvich, the great California colt, having been twice beaten 
by Whiskaway, may end his days in the shafts of an orange ped- 
dler's cart. The future of great racehorses like the popular famous 
politicians is very uncertain. 

— The Irish election was a surprise in the defeat of some of the 
most frenzied of De Valera's eat-'em-alive anti-Saxons. The Irish 
people plainly desire sanity, peace and profitable industry to movie 
melodrama with frothing agitators in the center of the stage. 

— La Follette's attack on the United States Supreme Court proves 
that direct vote of the people in the election of United States Sena- 
tors brings us several steps nearer to the triumphs of the rabble, 
which has made Russia the field of famine and death. 

— The fuss that the Volstead enforcers are able to make at Wash- 
ington over their row with Assistant United States Attorney Mc- 
Cormack, shows how powerful are the Prohibitionists with the Ad- 
ministration. They will have less influence after the elections this 

fall. 

— A great effort is being made by the ruling classes in England 
to popularize their clever young prince, who is in line for the imper- 
ial throne. The conservative Britishers see that their monarchy, with 
all its imperfections, is a vast improvement on present European 
Bolshevism. 

— Overswollen with the little brief prosperity of a professional 
baseball players' short public life. Babe Ruth is calling umpires 
ugly names and being disciplined. The real culprits are the yellow 
newspapers and the profiteers in amusement who create "kings" of 

the ball field, "queens" of the screen, etc. 

* * * 

— There is an active canvass going on for State Legislature po- 
sitions, by patriots who are better fitted by natural qualifications, 
and lack of education, to drive express wagons, or mix mortar. 
Slowly but surely State government, of and by the bourgeois and 

the rabble, heads toward a dictatorship. 

* * * 

— In their feverish desire for "circulation," which means more 
advertising at higher rates, the yellow newspapers publish pages 
about professional athletes who never contribute a nickel to the 
receipts, do the community more harm than good, and interest only 
a minority of the readers. A merchant could not get a line for noth- 
ing. 

* * * 

Poet Charles Keeler of Berkeley wants to see a subsidy for 
artists in poetry, music drama, painting, etc. Very good. But who 
is to dig up the cash. Charles? And how shall the diggers be guar- 
anteed that the subsidy will not be grafted by the impostors in art — 
the noisy and aggressive Charlatans, who will push genius aside and 
make a mad rush to the pie counter? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 1, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




Immigration authorities a t 
How Restricted Immigration Works Washington have just finished 

checking up the inward and 
outward passenger movement at all ports of entry and departure, 
with a view to measuring the net results of this country's first year 
of restrictive immigration on the per centum basis. The net results 
are somewhat of a surprise for the nine months of the fiscal year, 
from July 1, 1921, to March 31, 1922. Congress has extended the 
law for two years. It limits immigration to 3 per cent per year of 
the nationals residing in this country by the census of 1910. The 
total arrivals of all persons at all ports — immigrant aliens, non-im- 
migrant aliens and citizens — numbered 524,478. Total departures 
ran up to 488,639. The inward movement of passenger traffic was 
in excess of the outward movement only by the small margin of 
35,839. The total arrivals of all classes at all gateways of the na- 
tion were less than the daily floating population of New York City, 
estimated at over 700,000. 

For the nine months named 241,644 immigrant aliens were ad- 
mitted to the United States, while 160,918 emigrant aliens went 
out of the country, a balance of 80,726 representing excess of im- 
migration over emigration. 

Of the non-immigrant alien class, 88,579 came here, while 109,413 
went out of the country. 

Figuring by race or people, the computations of the immigration 
official tabulators show that the Jews led all other races, or peoples, 
with 43,728 admitted to the country during the nine months speci- 
fied. The report further shows that only 607 emigrant Jews went 
out of the United States in that time. 

It was expected that prohibition would affect the Latin races, and 
it has. The total number of Italians admitted in the nine months 
was 40,031. Of these 5840 were from Northern Italy and 34,191 
from Southern Italy. Four thousand more Italians left the United 
States than came here. The departure of Italians has always been 
large after our harvest season, but never like the number who re- 
turned to their native land in the past nine months. Undoubtedly 
the interference with wine, which is a food to many Latins, accounts 
for the large exodus. 

The Portuguese like the Italians returned in greater numbers 
than they arrived. There were 1 689 arrivals and 5 1 44 departures. 

Of Spanish, the arrivals were 1364 and departures 6735. Of 
Mexicans the arrivals were 10,103 and the departures 5071. Two 
thousand more Roumanians departed than the 1 500 who arrived. 

The departed Greeks also exceeded the arrivals, there having been 
3278 immigrants and 6286 who returned to Europe. 

Of English immigrants the arrivals were 21,015 and the depar- 
tures 6635. German immigrants came to the number of 23,332 and 
the total returns were only 4157. Of Scotch immigrants the arrivals 
were 10,245 and the departures 1163. French immigrants came to 
the number of 9569, and there departed 2237. The totals of Scan- 
inavian immigration show 11,112 arrivals and 3087 departures. Of 
Russians 1710 arrived and 2344 returned. The Japanese totals 
are 4458 arrivals and 3427 departures. 

The officials of our present administration are elated over the 
immigration reduction, it is announced. Whether wisely or other- 
wise, remains to be seen. The theory that the United States can 
get along with its native population is excellent and patriotic, but 
it is only theory. 

Most of the hard servile work in the United States has been done 
by immigrants. Will the native Americans do it? Employers in the 
building trades now say that American boys do not deserve to be 
building mechanics, and that is why plasterers are getting $14 a 



day, plumbers almost as much, carpenters $8.50 a day, and ordin- 
ary painters three time their pre-war pay. There is a shortage of 
hands for the rough work. The unions have for years been re- 
fusing to admit apprentices, but even if American boys were al- 
lowed to enter the building trades, it is said by contractors, they 
would not be anxious for the work. They wish to be professional 
men, though many professional men are earning less than plasterers 
at present. 

The reduction of the Japanese has made it more difficult and ex- 
pensive to obtain people for servile house-work. The rough labor 
problem is an important one. Houses have to be built and houses 
and streets have to be swept, farms have to be cultivated, garbage 
must be collected. The native American has naturally not sought 
such servile employment. Will he become more anxious for dis- 
agreeable toil the more cultured he shall become? We cannot build 
cheap tenements for the masses and pay plasterers $14 a day, nor 
can we have the streets swept by municipal broom handlers draw- 
ing $6 a day. 



Can an important railroad system exist with- 
Shippers Are Aroused out having a political department to protect 
it? In other words, must it be eternally on 
the watch for attacks, like a bank which retains private guards to 
repel burglars and expects little aid from the regular police. The 
predicament of the shippers that fear cost and trouble from the 
tearing apart of the Southern and Central Pacific railroads prompts 
the question. All sorts of private associations are flying to the aid 
of the Southern Pacific to avert the catastrophe, for such seems the 
separation of the roads to private citizens who have need of their 
service. 

In the days when the Southern Pacific looked to its political de- 
partment as an essential agent in its operation, it placed most re- 
liance on its own ability to avoid danger. It was ever ready to 
welcome the friendly aid of outsiders, but it did not pin its faith 
on them, any more than does the bank guarded by private watch- 
men rely on the patrolman at the corner of the street. He may be 
off playing pedro when the burglars are cracking the safe. 

The late C. P. Huntington believed that railroads should have as 
little to do with politics as a church. The money expended on a 
railroad political machine should be put into better service for the 
public. The public would appreciate it, declared the great business 
man. But he was not a great politician. Had he been be would have 
foreseen that under our form of politics a large public service cor- 
poration must fight for its existence day and night and depend for 
its success on the followers it can command like a feudal baron of 
the Middle Ages. One of the first effects of the voluntary breaking 
up of the Southern Pacific political machine was that Hiram John- 
son claimed to have done the job and has been a candidate for the 
Presidency of the United States ever since on the strength of his 
assertion. Sacramento politicians who formerly ate out of the hand 
of the manager of the railroad political machine, have been osten- 
tatiously handling the lever ever since to the sorrow of the tax- 
payers and the slackness of their pocketbooks. The State is in a 
sony plight since the corporation abdicated their interest in gov- 
ernment and passed over to the professional politicians the power 
to levy the taxes and spend them. 

If we had efficient, responsible government, public service corpo- 
rations might look with confidence to the courts and commissions 
for even handed justice. The golden rule might be expected to 
work. But not when the loudest demagogues have the best chance of 
election to the United States Senate by direct vote of the mob. 



July I. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



The attempt to tear apart the Southern and Central Pacific is 
the outcome of Bolshevist tendencies extending over many years, and 
culminating in an unavoidable conflict of our commissions and the 
supreme court. We took away the regulation of interstate railroads 
from the States because they used the power to create demagogic 
control of government. Now the respected supreme court of the 
United States, proceeding on old lines, is out of plumb with the 
rulings of modern commissions and new transportation acts to make 
the regulation of railroad business satisfactory to politicians and 
business men. Of course it could not fail to be out of plumb. No 
one can make a business and politics work to the perfect satisfac- 
tion of the business world. 

To the credit of our representative business men and associa- 
tions, they are doing the best they can to straighten out the legal 
and business tangle, caused by the supreme court's order to dis- 
member the Central and Southern Pacific roads. 

A call to every merchant and shipper in California to protect 
his own interests by going on record immediately regarding the 
threatened tearing apart of the system has been issued by Wallace 
M. Alexander, president of the Chamber of Commerce and chair- 
man of the newly organized State-wide committee against Dis- 
memberment. 

The statement points out that in the judgment of the committee, 
demoralized service and higher rates are inevitable unless the dis- 
solution of the system is averted, and declares that the remedy is 
largely in the hands of merchants and shippers. It asks that every 
firm send a letter to the committee, at the Chamber of Commerce 
in San Francisco, for presentation to the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission at its coming hearing. 



The Presidential bee in 
Attack on the White House Chicken Roost Hearst's bonnet, which 

was placed there many 
years ago by Andy Lawrence, editor of the San Francisco Journal, 
is buzzing frantically again. Brother Hearst cut short his European 
trip two weeks, partly on account of the frosty reception he got 
from the decent citizens, and partly because his present political 
manager, William J. Connors, a Buffalo, N. Y., publisher, spilled 
the beans in an unguarded moment. "Boss" Connors had been 
openly making Hearst's fight for Governor of New York while the 
syndicate publisher was off in London reading the frigid comments 
on his personality and performances by prominent British writers. 

The plot to sneak over the back fence of the White House, so 
to speak, and rob the chicken coop, was proceeding on all fours, 
like a cat sneaking on a bunch of quail. Suddenly Boss Connors 
stubbed his toe and the lights were flashed on. The chief of the 
chicken bandits blurted out the whole confession and new arrange- 
ments will have to be planned to invade the White House by help 
of the clothes line, or something. 

When confronted by New York reporters. Boss Connors admitted 
that the Governorship nomination in New ^lork was only a blind. 
The real prize that was being sought over the back fence of the 
White House was the Presidential nomination in 1924. Connors 
got quite worked up over the disclosure. He offered to bet $1 to 
$10,000 that his political client would be nominated for Governor, 
and if elected, would be the logical patriot, make the speech of 
thanks to the mob from the front balcony of the White House at 
Washington in November, 1924. 

"On what issues will you present Mr. Hearst to the country as 
a Presidential candidate?" Boss Conners was asked by the reporters. 

"On the ground that he is different from any man who ever has 
been offered to the Democratic party as a candidate for that great 
office," replied the indiscreet Conners. "On the ground that Hearst 
represents within the Democratic Party the type of public official 
that Theodore Roosevelt did represent and Hiram Johnson continues 
to represent within the Republican Party. ' 

Such is the statement of the way the Hearst agent spilled the 



beans. No wonder that when Hearst read it at breakfast in London 
he rushed to the telephone and ordered passage home by the fastest 
liner he could catch by express to Southampton. 

The trouble about the candor of the syndicate publisher's political 
manager is the necessity of Mr. Hearst's first deciding what ticket 
to run on. He will be, nominally, a Democrat, of course, but a Demo- 
crat with numerous reservations. He has organized so many politi- 
cal side-shows that he must be very diplomatic, or he will lose nine- 
tenths of his votes right before he starts. Camouflaged as a straight- 
out dyed in the wool would be dangerous. Dyes have been very 
unsatisfactory ever since the war. 

Candidate Hearst's latest open attempt at political team work in 
public was as head of the Political Union for Progress of Politics. 
How the Tammany push would line up under the flag is easy to 
foretell. Without Tammany, the political Chameleon cannot climb 
into the White House, even by the back porch. 

Announcement that the prodigal expenditures in Publisher Hearst's 
former glide toward the White House will not be repeated in the 
1924 campaign will no doubt have a frosty effect on Tammany 
patriotism. In his former lavish Presidential campaign, the impres- 
sion on the public mind was as if a large force of coal passers was 
shoveling out the barrels. The Newberry scandal has made hard- 
cash campaigns temporarily unsatisfactory. Moreover, candidates 
for high public office must be keenly on the alert for the "double] 
cross." It may be easier to lead Brother Hearst to the political un- 
dertaking parlors, and give him a seemly funeral, than defeat him 
in the primary scrimmage and have him survive as a battle-scarred 
veteran. What more scientific and effective than to hand him the 
Democratic nomination for Governor of New York on a silver platter 
and let the Republican candidate for re-election, Governor Miller, 
administer him a bad walloping. That would save an eminent 
patriot the painful necessity of shouldering Washington off his ped- 
estal in the Temple of Fame as the most eminent of our Presidents. 



The ship subsidy bill has been placed 
Prohibition and Ship Subsidy in a dangerous predicament by the 

indiscreet statement of Chairman 
Lasker of the Shipping Board that American ships have no chance 
to compete unless allowed to run bars. A red flag to a bull could 
not have been more irritating to our Prohibition Congress. It was 
not diplomatic of Chairman Lasker to have said it. But we must 
at least compliment him on his candor. He told only the plain, un- 
varnished truth. Many Americans will not sail on a "dry" Ameri- 
can ship. Many Americans will refuse to patronize their "wet" 
ships that violate the Volstead law at sea, and observe it at the 
wharf. It appears to them a dishonest policy to try to make crooked 
dollars and at the same time make a hypocritical pretense of fur- 
thering fanaticism. 

There is no question that it is illegal for American ships, outside 
the three-mile limit as well as inside, to sell intoxicating liquors. 
Many court decisions on the amenability of American ships to Amer- 
ican laws, wherever the vessels may be, remove all doubts on the 
subject. An American ship anchored at coral reef in the Pacific 
is subject to American laws. 

The threats of Prohibitionists that no vessels of any nation, car- 
rying intoxicating liquor, will be permitted to touch American shores, 
is fanatical hysteria, discreditable to the the American Congress. 

Our useless fleet is costing the American taxpayers fifty millions 
rather than make it continuous over a period of years, as it would 
seem to be whether it is not better to cut the loss at one stroke, 
rather han make it continuous over a period of years, as it would 
be under the plan of a subsidy. To sell the ships now at the mar- 
ket price or even below it would be in effect to give a sort of con- 
cealed subsidy to the buyers. It would meet the argument that 
American shipowners cannot compete on even terms with foreigners. 
If they got their ships at a very low cost they certainly ought to be 
able to compete." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 1, 1922 




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©limits for Property ©woem 

High Taxes Make it Impossible to Pay for Homes 



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BY MONTGOMERY SMITH 



THE transportation committee of the California Real Estate As- 
sociation has issued a statement that the recession of real estate 
values in many places in the State is due to impaired facilities of 
electric railroads. It would be as near to the real explanation if the 
transportation committee said that the trouble is that conductors 
do not wear scarlet uniforms with pearl buttons and the motormen 
do not cultivate chin whiskers. In other words, the Real Estate 
Association is miles away from the facts of the realty market condi- 
tions. The true and only reason why real estate values recede any- 
where is that the people think real estate investment is a losing game. 
Why does not the California Real Estate Association face that awk- 
ward fact, and take some steps to prove that real estate can be made 
profitable? Let us reduce the high taxes, for one remedy, and drive 
the profiteers out of the building trades as another remedy. 
Robbing the Property Owners 
For years there has been a systematic effort of politicians and 
grafters of various kinds to saddle all taxes on realty. The property 
owner has been an easy mark. He cannot conceal his house and 
lot when the assessment is made. Every form of private personal 
property has a better chance of escaping taxation than has real 
estate. In this world, people move along the lines of least resistance, 
and the tax collector and taxeaters are no exceptions. All that they 
have to do is reach for the property owner's purse and help them- 
selves. The newspapers, unintentionally, lend their help in the rob- 
bery of the property holders. Every year they publish statements 
showing the enormous increase of property values in the city. In 
realty the increase is in the minds of the taxeaters, who naturally 
make the increase as enormous as the reporters will swallow. If 
they set the increase at imaginary billions, instead of millions, the 
reporters would publish without stopping to verify the figures. The 
announcement of the "enormous increase in civic wealth," is the 
signal for all the vultures that fatten on a municipality to gather to 
the feast. At once the Supervisors are besieged by grafters of every 
conceivable and inconceivable sort, demanding that their special 
graft shall be protected in the annual budget. This process explains 
how, in a comparatively few years, the annual cost of our city gov- 
ernment has advanced from six millions to twenty-five millions, and 
threatens to proceed to confiscation of the houses and lots of the 
small owners. The tax rate has advanced from $1 on the hundred 
to $3.45 on the hundred. Not only that, but there has been a more 
or less steady increase of assessed valuations, so that people not only 
pay almost four times the former rate per hundred, but pay more 
on the assessed valuation of their property. Taxation is rapidly ap- 
proaching the confiscation stage. In San Francisco we have, for- 
tunately for the taxpayers, a very fair and discriminating assessor, 
Mr. John Ginty, but the system is too much for any man. The best 
official cannot overcome a thoroughly bad system of government. 
Insanity Called Progressive Government 
What we call "our municipality" should really be termed our mad- 
house. It is inconceivable that people calling themselves sane citizens 
tolerate it. The purpose of a municipality should be strict business. 
The taxpayers should get the best protection of life and property 
for the least money. The reverse is the case. The men we place 
in municipal offices, instead of deporting themselves as the servants 
of the people, generally act as if they were overlords of a foreign 
power that had conquered us, and intended to exact the last cent 
in taxes to make us realize our slavery. Such was the method of 



the old Roman conquerors, who ruled in the subdued provinces. 
When a Roman politician was appointed to a proconsulship, it was 
expected that he would graft enough to pay all his debts and live 
on the fat of the land for the remainder of his life. Lucullus, who 
still ranks as the model of civilized extravagance in social hospital- 
ity, made all his money out of the Asiatics he was sent to govern. 
He robbed them right and left. Our municipal overlords do not imi- 
tate the Roman proconsuls who robbed the natives. They rob their 
own taxpayers The money they grab from the taxpayers goes into 
a sort of eleemosynary fund to support the increasing army of drones 
that operates what we call our City Hall political machine. For 
eminence in that organization inefficiency is the first essential. The 
moment any official begins to display symptoms indicative of latent 
business talent, he is disposed of like that celebrated scriptural 
character, Jonah, who was tossed overboard to make a mouthful 
for a whale. 

A Crime Against Home Builders 
High taxes that make it hard for an humble home builder to 
maintain a house and reduce its value after the owner, after a great 
effort, has obtained it, are a crime against humanity. Without 
homes there cannot be a free America. It will not suffice to rent 
two rooms in an apartment house at $50 a month and call them 
a home. Now, the high taxes have made building cites cheap, but 
the profiteers in labor have made it impossible to erect a modest 




.800,000 owas were 5erved 
attha PANAMA- PACIFIC 
Tvtemaiional EXPOSITION- 



Telephones 
Suiter 6654 — Oakland 1017 



lyiuuuu 



July I, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



little home for less than $1000 a room. This means that a seven- 
room house and lot cannot be bought for much less than $8000, 
which is beyond the reach of the average wage-earner. If he should 
acquire a little heme it is probably thrown together in flimsy style, 
and will soon begin to need renovation. Before the owner has paid 
one-half of the installments he will have expended a considerable 
sum on repairs. Before he shall have paid all his installments his 
cottage will be practically worthless. His lot, owing to the high 
taxes, will not have advanced in value to compensate for the de- 
preciation of his building. This may be an extreme view of the 
situation, but in a general way it presents the obstacles to the wage- 
earner starting out to build his own home and to raise a family in 
the old-fashioned thrifty way. He is undertaking a contract which 
few can fill. When he dies he will have little to leave to his family, 
in spite of his years of industry. High taxes will have sapped his 
life. He would have done better, financially, had he put his sav- 
ings in the bank and drawn 4 per cent per annum on the amount. 
Four per cent net on real estate is as much as most realty returns, 
yet the municipality levies taxes on us at the rate of $3.45 on the 
hundred, and besides there are Federal taxes to be met and insurance 
and repairs to be paid. 

Times Have Changed 

It was formerly a good plan for an industrious young couple 
starting in family life to buy two flats and rent one. At the old dollar 
rate of taxation a wage-earner in that way laid the foundation of 
comfort for old age. There was a profit on the flat he rented, and 
repairs could be made at a reasonable outlay. But now, plasterers 
are paid $14 a day, and carpenters and plumbers charge at the rate 
of at least a dollar an hour. Ordinary painters charge $8.50 a 
day, and paint is costly, if the flat owner wishes to do the work 
himself. Roofers also charge fancy prices. Owning property usu- 
ally means being money out of pocket. An owner of some 
cheap four-room flats was charged $125 the other day for the tint- 
ing and painting of one of them. Fifty dollars would have been a 
liberal pre-war price. Thirty dollars would have been the right 
price some years ago. The flats rent for $25 a month, so the owner 
had to pay five months rent in cash to install a new tenant and the 
former tenant went away leaving the last three months rent unpaid. 
When you figure that the unlucky owner has to pay a $3.45 tax 
on this property, and keep the roof in repair, and paint the exterior, 
and pay for the water, it needs no argument to convince him that 
he is losing money by owning tenement property in San Francisco. 
It is much the same story in every city. It is not possible for him 
to pay $8.50 a day for tinting a cheap flat, work which is as easy 
as whitewashing a fence. It is not possible for him to pay carpenters 
and all the others the profiteering wages, and in addition pay the 
$3.45 tax rate, and the insurance rate, and the water rate and the 
tenement house rate demanded by the Board of Health. 
Why Tax-exempt Bonds Are Bought 

People with money are buying tax— exempt bonds in preference 
to real estate. Who can blame them? Eleven billions of these se- 
curities are afloat. That means that interest on eleven billions more 
of bonds have been saddled on real estate, and in addition the eleven 
billions of principal borrowed will have to be paid by the States and 
municipalities that have put out the bonds. 

Unless we limit the voting at city election to personal voters, who 
pay some city taxes, however low, nobody can afford to own prop- 
erty. That is what is desired by the Socialists who are advocating 
all kinds of welfare schemes. Confiscation of all private property- 
is their purpose. That is what the Real Estate Association has to 
meet and not rectification of the laws affecting electric railways. 



— Sam Gompers weeps crocodile tears over the savage massacre 
of non-union miners in Illinois. He's been doing that for fifty years, 
and making speeches for the acquittal of the union thugs, as he did 
for the McNamaras, who blew up the Los Angeles Times. 



In the 
Summer 

The shirt and the cravat play the 
most important parts in man's attire 



« <• ■« 



D. C. Hearer 



MAKER OF EXCLUSIVE SHIRTS 

NECKWEAR - UNDERWEAR - PAJAMAS - ROBES 



San Francisco 
11 6-1 IS Kearny Street 




Los Angeles 

407 W. Seventh Street 



PAYROLL CUT 42,000 

The administration is making renewed efforts to cut down the 
force of Federal clerks in Washington. At the time of the armistice 
they numbered 112,000. That figure has been reduced to 70,000, 
but still further discharges are expected to bring the force nearer the 
pre-war total. New orders to department heads call for the dis- 
missal of temporary and inefficient employes. Postmaster General 
Weeks is going carefully over his department searching for those 
whose services can be dispensed with, and it is expected that sub- 
stantial reductions in his force will be made in the near future. 
Other cabinet officers are making similar plans. 




FEATHER RIVER INN 



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Flnr Orihf.tm — Uttminc ll«j K.vpninc 

NOW OPEN 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 1, 1922 



MARKET STREET CONDITION A WARNING 

That Market street "faces a serious situation with its four car 
tracks and two-way traffic resulting in uneven development of com- 
mercial establishments" was declared this week at a Palace Hotel 
luncheon by Dr. Carol Aronovici, a city planner now laying out 
Berkeley and Richmond. He was addressing the National Progress 
Club. 

The city planner could have added that not alone on Market 
street, but all over San Francisco, a serious situation is being caused 
by the unwise competition of our municipal car system and the pri- 
vate company. Market street was unwisely injured by placing on 
it additional tracks to compete with the private corporation, operat- 
ing under a lawful franchise. It was a dishonorable move in the 
interest of public ownership to destroy a rival company, which in 
the face of enormous difficulties, had restored its tracks after the 
great fire of 1906. Our main thoroughfare was overcrowded with 
tracks and rendered dangerous, so that the private company might 
be driven from the field. That was little short of bolshevist poli- 
tics. 

By giving ear to demagogic advice in San Francisco we have 
stopped the building of railroad extension by private capital. The 
municipal system can afford to spend money on extensions, if the 
taxpayers permit it to be taken out of the taxes paid for the run- 
ning of the government. The great trouble with municipal railroad 
extensions is that they are often built more for the political effect 
than for the benefit of the property owners and the prosperity of 
the community. The politicians with the strongest pull get the lines 
extended where they wish, regardless of what they cost the tax- 
payers. 

The most obvious thing in the world is that there shall be im- 
mediate unification of our street car systems, and prevention of 
the grave mistake on Market street being duplicated and quad- 
ruplicated. There must be unity of management, one responsible 
head and one plan to develop the city's business and residential 
districts, with the least cost to the taxpayers. 

The most feasible plan is to buy the private lines out of their 
earnings and there appears to be no bar to that if the municipal 
representatives go about the business in a logical and business-like 
way. Let us forget all about our generation-old fight to drive pri- 
vate capital out of the transportation business and endeavor only 
to make our city greater and by harmonious consummation of a 
good plan of purchase, unification, satisfaction and prosperity. 



C. C. MOORE FOR U. S. SENATOR 

The announcement that C. C. Moore will contest the nomination 
for Senator with Senator Hiram Johnson must be satisfactory to 
all patriotic citizens. The safety of the Republic depends on the 
popular interest in elections. It is dangerous to prosperity and lib- 
erty when any set of candidates is allowed to divide the public 
offices as if they were members of a dynastic sovereignty. 

Regardless of the popularity of Senator Johnson, or Mr. Moore, 
it is beneficial to the Republican party and the State that two such 
prominent citizens should contend for the toga. Both are nation- 
ally celebrated: Senator Johnson as having been a candidate for 
the highest gift in the power of the people, and Mr. Moore as head 
of the eminently successful exposition, which practically placed San 
Francisco on the map of the world. 

There is complaint of lack of public interest in registration and 
voting, but with two such noted contenders for the senatorship of 
California, there should be no more discouragement on that score. 
The apathy and discouragement that comes from belief that ma- 
chine politics has the State in its grip, must give way to renewed 
hope in the great future of California. 

It should not be forgotten that the paramount consideration of 
the voters this year, is economy of government and reduction of 
taxes. All other considerations sink into insignificance. California 
has not lagged in the mad race toward national bankruptcy. Our 



State taxes have become an enormous load and still grow weightier 
— more unbearable. How much of this can be attributed to Sena- 
tor Johnson, and how far can the election of a noted business man 
in his place relieve the owners of every farm, factory, store and 
cottage in the State? What will be gained or lost nationally by the 
re-election or defeat of Senator Johnson, when the Republican 
party s trials to restore safe and representative American govern- 
ment are at their crisis? These are the very grave questions for 
the Republican Stale of California to consider in casting its ballot 
in the coming senatorial primary election. 



A STRIKE AGAINST THE AMERICAN PEOPLE 

The railroad workers who are threatening to strike do not see 
that their quarrel is not with the railroads, but the natural economic 
laws that rule the'world. 

Railroad rates have been reduced by order of the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, which took note of the fact that some of the 
causes of high transportation rates had disappeared. Their disap- 
pearance reduced the cost of living, and of that fact the Interstate 
Commerce Commission again took note when it ordered a reduc- 
tion in the wages of railway shop mechanics and freight car men. 

The railroads have no more to do with cutting wages than they 
have with raising or lowering transportation rates. These are gov- 
ernment functions, exercised by the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion. The labor leaders should say to the intending strikers that for 
a long time the Interstate Commerce Commission compelled the rail- 
roads to serve the people at a price that paid little or nothing to 
the railroad owners, and that the service was rendered. If the rail- 
road managers had carried their dissatisfaction with the rates estab- 
lished by the Interstate Commerce Commission to the point of a 
strike, and had refused to operate the roads, and had tried to pre- 
vent others from doing so, the people would have torn them to pieces. 

The people know that the railroad employes, who have voted to 
strike against the railroads which did not, and could not, order the 
cut in wages, have been misled and are not quite responsible for 
the announcement that no engine wheel will turn and that the coun- 
try's transportation system will be completely paralyzed. But the 
railroad employes and their union bosses must be made to under- 
stand that such a walk-out as they propose is less a strike against 
the railroads than a war against the American people, and that the 
American people when warred upon are a rather dangerous foe. 




For information that will 
lead to the arrest and con- 
viction of the party or 
parties that shot or were 
responsible for the shoot- 
ing of Peter Logan Satur- 
day morning June 17, 1922. 

Union Plant, Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation 



July I, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




'Har&CixriyHttilK'iievlaitUml' 
Ooc tbtl KillpLij the det'i/.sir. vithpxL 



— The massacre of non-union miners in Illinois, permitted by 
elected public officials, if not actually encouraged, was an inhuman 
and cowardly outburst of mob savagery, which should remind us 
that before deploring Armenian butcheries and pogroms in Poland, 
we should elevate our own American standard of civilization. 

— It will eradicate the stains of blood on the constitution of the 
United States' and on the codes of Illinois to blame the ferocious 
massacre of non-union miners on the "ignorant and lawless foreign 
element." In the past twenty-five years we have had more lynchings 
in the United States than lawful executions by order of our courts 
of justice. That terrible fact was established firmly a few months 
ago by the debate in Congress on the anti-lynching bill. It is re- 
corded in the Congressional Record, the official report of proceed- 
ings in our national houses of legislation. It stands before the world 
as an awful indictment of American contempt of the laws that cost 
so much to frame for the ostensible protection of life and property, 
and repression of the lawless mob spirit. 

— The additional reproach that nearly twenty thousand murders 
and homicides occur every year in the United States cannot be dis- 
posed of by charging it all against the "ignorant and lawless for- 
eigners." No one should be ignorant in our country where we spend 
such vast sums on education, and school houses, and the lawless class 
whether aliens or natives should be punished. We have more gov- 
ernment officials for enforcing the laws than any nation on earth 
and fewer criminals are placed behind bars. Those who go to prison 
generally get out on parole or by executive pardon. We are so busy 
making money we do not stop to take a good look at the results of 
our governmental toleration of crimes against the lives and prop- 
erty of law-abiding people. 

* * * 

— For thirty years and more politicians, posing as leaders of 
union miners, have been committing atrocious crimes to make their 
grip secure on the mining industry in all our mining States. Crimes 
as atrocious as the butchery of non-union coal miners in Illinois 
have been almost numberless in Nevada, Idaho and Colorado, but 
so callous to murder and class tyranny has the American public be- 
come that the outrages attracted very little attention. 

* * * 

— Some years ago when the Western Federation of Miners, which 
better merited the title of Western Federation of Murderers, was 
terrorizing the mining industry in Idaho, the chief assassin of the 
organization, Harry Orchard, blew up a railroad platform with sev- 
eral hundred non-union miners returning from work. Military law 

had to be invoked. 

¥ * * 

— Governor Stucrenberg of Idaho was blown to fragments at 
his garden gate by a hidden bomb, placed by Orchard, who had 
shadowed him for months seeking an opportunity to murder him. 
The scoundrel, when caught, confessed all his hideous offenses to 
make the inner circle of the Western Federation of Miners the mast- 
ers of the American mining industry. He was never hanged. Hay- 
wood and Moyer, the heads of the murderous organization, escaped 
with a few years' sentence and Haywood is now recruiting Ameri- 
can communists for the Soviet, with whom he is associated in Rus- 
sia. New York newspapers refer to the deported villian as if he 
were a man engaged in > lawful enterprise. Why wonder at inhuman 
massacres of independent miners in Illinois? The United States 
stands on the crust of a volcano of lawlessness, caused by feeble- 



ness and corruption of State government which encourages the mob 
spirit. 

— When union taxicab strikers in San Francisco can fire on in- 
dependent cabs and burn them, and the district attorney's office 
appears to wish that the injuried parties were the ones jailed, we 
are not far from the confusion of right and wrong, which has caused 
the mob butchery of non-union miners in Illinois and made the 
civilized world shudder at the lawlessness of America. 

— By the factor of District Attorney Brady's office, a civil service 
fireman, who was caught burglarizing a tailor store, has been rein- 
stated in the Fire Department and is now drawing salary from the 
city. If such laxity should extend to our Police Department, we 
would not be far from the Soviet hell in Russia, where Haywood, 
former head of the Western Federation of Murderers, now pursues 
his gentle art of cultivating criminality. The murderous mob spirit 
requires a strong and resolute hand to repress it, and if our 
reliance is to be placed on a district attorney's office favorable to 
the liberation of burglarizing firemen, and the concession of new 
trials to dynomiters as merciless as Henry Orchard, who blew up a 
railroad platform filled with non-union miners, our honest citizens 
who have any property to lose had better be organizing for defense. 



— The massacre of non-union miners in Illinois reminds us that 
President Cleveland put United States troops into Chicago to stop 
the terrorism of anarchists and protect life and property, which a 
Socialist Governor, somewhat like the present Illinois jellyfish, 
thought should protect themselves. 

— The United States is a nation of "fads, frauds and grand- 
motherism," and we should form a league against them, declared 
Conan Doyle, as he sailed away to England. And one of the biggest 
frauds is Conan with his dreary and moss-grown cult of making the 
dead knock on tables. 
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HOO 
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(houdaille) 

HYDRAULIC 

SHOCK ABSORBERS 

H. D. SCHRODER & CO., Inc. 



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•;••;- 



Distributors 



J* Telephone Franklin 698 



1616 Bush St. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 1, 1922 



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Astounding Criminal Statistics Issued by the American Bar Association 

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BY HARVEY BROUGHAM 



THERE is incessant motion and perpetual progress or retrogres- 
sion. The mountains change. The ocean is subject to changes. 
Evolution is endless. 

The United States began as a handful of people on the shores of 
the Atlantic. It has now spread from ocean to ocean, with a popu- 
lation of about 110,000,000. Whereas there were millions of acres 
of free land to be taken up, there is now not an acre of free land 
worth the taking up. Just try to fine some. 

Our cities have grown disproportionately to the rural population, 
and seem to be fated to increase. We have just begun to face the 
problems predicted by Macaulay, who foresaw the changes conse- 
quent on the disappearance of free state land. 

Protection of life and property is no longer guaranteed by State 
governments, to which we pay enormous taxes, as well as the taxes 
exacted by the Federal power. Protection of life and property in 
the United States was never very secure, but in a new country such 
deficiencies are to be expected. We have now reached the stage 
of maturity where excuses of our shortcoming cannot be based on 
youth. When the murder record is about 20,000 a year, when di- 
vorces are beyond computation, and where robberies, incendiary 
fires, and all forms of swindling in business and out of it are such 
that President Harding pleaded for a higher code of honor the 
other day, we must pause in our mad pursuit of money to clean 
house. 

European cities say that Americans have no time for anything 
but to die. We must meet that reproach by showing that we have 
time to reform our courts of justice, for they are at the bottom of 
the great evils that threaten our civilization. Our courts are the 
foundations of government. What would it avail if we could elect 
a superman as president, while the State courts of the United States 
were fostering criminality and breeding criminals? No superman at 
Washington could overcome such an obstacle to good government. 
Let us give up the idea that we can find a superman, who will rad- 
iate such honesty from the White House that all the land will be 
bright and pure. Let us begin the Herculean task of cleansing the 
State courts and destroying the taint which is sure to kill our gov- 
ernment, if left unpurified. 

A start has been made in State court purification by the com- 
mittee of law enforcement of the American Bar Association, which 
has just published the statement that St. Louis leads in the record 
of American criminality. Of course there is an outcry and denials. 
Chairman William B. Swaney of the committee says that the sta- 
tistics gathered are the most reliable in existence. Judge William 
N. Gemmill of Chicago, who had charge of the preparation of the 
statistics, is acknowledged to be a reliable authority. 

Judge Gemmill placed the tar brush on St. Louis by reason of the 
fact that in 1921 it had 426 murders and homicides. While the 
record of St. Louis last year was positively the worst, Los Angeles 
stands preeminent as a center of crime, on a seven-year survey. By 
comparison, Los Angeles has had three times as many murders, in 
proportion to the population, as New York, and two and a half 
times as many as Chicago. That is going some for our progressive 
Southern neighbor. 

"What is true as to murders is partly true as to other major 
crimes," declares Judge Gemmill. "If the balance of the year 1922 
equals January and February of this year, Los Angeles will lead 
all other cities in the number of burglaries and housebreakings. She 



is not even closely followed by any other large city. Chicago comes 
next on the roll of dishonor." 

It is not going to be a good thing for any American city or its 
merchants that it is in the "roll of dishonor." Lawlessness will be 
put down by the American people. They must put it down by the 
reform of State courts or the nation will retrograde.' Making com- 
parisons of American cities with those of Canada, England and 
Wales, Judge Gemmill says: 

"About 600,000 people are arrested in England and Wales an- 
nually. The population there is about twelve times that of Chicago 
and seven times that of New York. For every arrest for murder 
in England and Wales in 1920, Chicago had eight and a half, New 
York six and three-quarters and St. Louis too many to count. 

"The only reason why there is less crime in England than here 
is because there the law is supreme and whatever is needed to make 
it respected is done. It was for this reason that the penalty of flog- 
ging has been kept upon their statute books for a thousand years, 
and this last year over 1000 criminals were flogged by order of court. 

"The penalty applies to wife beaters, professional crooks, pick- 
pockets, hold-up men and some burglars. Nothing is so much feared 
as 50 strokes upon the bare back with the birch rod. These profes- 
sional criminals have fled and come to our shores. 

"We have only one State that they have shunned and that is 
Delaware, where they receive the same lashes as they do in London 
— and why should we be squeamish about it? There are at least 
500 professional criminals in Chicago. The police know them all, 
but in our desire never to punish the innocent we have leaned too 
far backward and these crooks have terrorized our cities, driven us 
from our streets in fear, murdered and robbed our loved ones. Is 
it not better that we should inflict stripes upon their bare backs 
(the only thing they fear) than that the law will be defied and our 
homes invaded? 

"Whatever is necessary to make these crooks understand that this 
is a Government of law and order, that we must do. Ninety-nine per 
cent of our people are honest and law-abiding. They must not be 
ruled or intimidated by the other 1 per cent. 

"Crime is not generally profitable to the criminal, and when he 
is made to realize that punishment is swift and certain and drastic, 
he will look for other fields in which to exercise his talents. 

"The American Bar Association is doing a fine service in trying 
to discover the causes of crime. I predict, however, that it will con- 
clude that the one great cause is the lack of law enforcement. Laws 
are the product of civilized society. They are made to protect the 
innocent and punish the guilty. When they fail in doing either 
one of these two things, they fail society and society degenerates 
into savagery. Wherever you find a lax enforcement of law you 
find crime. Public officials can never have an abili. Success in 
enforcing the law can be their only password. Excuses won't go." 

The remedy in law enforcement is to copy the British plan of 
taking judges out of small politics by appointing them, as we do in 
our Federal courts that work so well. While we make our judges 
subject to elections, we shall have no important diminution of crime, 
and no strong cohesion of public opinion. The coddjing of crimi- 
nals by foolish sentimentalists, and the prominence given to crim- 
inality by yellow newspapers is causing murder to be regarded as 
a trifle. Small boys in all the side streets play as being bandits and 
assassins. It is time for decent Americans to arouse themselves. 



July I, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



II 



Cafe Marquard 

GEARY AND MASON STREETS 
Telephone Prospect 61 

Visitors In San Francisco Delight in the 
Gay Bohemian Atmosphere, the Enter- 
tainment and Dancing:, the Rare Quality 
of Food and Courteous Service 



LUNCHEON 

Continental Style 

Twenty-six Delicious Dishes, Prepared 

and Served So Differently 



DINNER 



Every Evening — Six to Nine 
Also Select a la Carte 



Dancing and Cabaret 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 1 6 San Bruno, Cal. 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RI0R 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Mini* a little better than Been™ necessary" 

phe typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 

diir;ilt'|p boxes mntaining five hundred perfect 
Sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
oovers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
:i7-4:> Pint Street - - San Francisco 



FEATHER RIVER INN 

Feather River Inn opened for the season 
June 10 — Willard Wilson Brown, manager 
— the same management as last year. 

The best road from San Francisco to the 
inn is by Sacramento, Auburn, Colfax, Grass 
Valley, Downieville, Sierra City, Feather 
River Inn. The road from Grass Valley to 
Sierra City has been worked by convicts 
and at the present time is almost as good as 
any State road as it is top dressed with gravel 
all the way. This road, now opened, makes 
much the best way to reach the Feather 
River Canyon by automobile, coming through 
the wonderful Yuba Pass and also running 
through all the old gold mining districts of 
that section. 

The new golf course, which was com- 
pleted June I, 1921, is in wonderful condi- 
tion and golfers pronounce it one of the 
best nine-hole golf courses in California. 
Peter Soutar, golf professional, in charge. 
Horseback riding is one of the great features. 
Every day from ten to fifteen of the guests 
go on horseback rides to the different lakes, 
taking their lunch with them and spending 
the day in the wonderful big pines of the 
lake region. There are forty-two lakes within 
ten miles of Feather River Inn, all of them 
well stock with trout and, in almost all of 
them, one can catch the limit of fish — 25 — 
any day you go out. 

Bowling is popular. Dance music by a 
fine orchestra. Bridge games are also very 
popular. There will be a golf tournament 
open for men guests July 10. A handsome 
silver loving cup for first prize. 

There will be a golf tournament open for 
women guests July 17. A handsome silver 
loving cup for the prize. 

Professional golf tournament open to all 
professionals will be held August 24- — cash 
prizes. All golf professionals are invited to 
enter this tournament. 



A VERY CREDITABLE AFFAIR 

The convention of the Disabled American 
Veterans in San Francisco this week has 
been one more demonstration of the warmth 
of San Francisco's welcome for all worthy 
visitors who enter our gates. In every re- 
spect the convention was a credit to the 
veterans and the city. 



The man with the smile wins — especially 
if it's located in his hip pocket! — Judge. 



Wedding Present* — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently Incited ;it I'osl and Powell Sts. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 

TKESANFRANCISCOSAVINGSANDLOANSOCIETY 

Francisco 
Mission Brmneh, Mission sad Twenty-first St& 
Park-Presldlo i»i-t. lirnnrli, Clement and 7th Av, 

llnicht Mreet Hrrtiirh. Haight and BslTSdC 

For ti r ending June 3nth, I 

divides ired at the rate of foor 

and nnr-qimrtor <4',l per cent per annum on 

all deposits payable on and after July 1st. 

Dividends i added to the 

nit and earn dividend from July 1st 

«.r before July l"th. 

will earn interest from July 1st. I 

GF.<~> TOURNY. Manager. 



BANK OF ITALY 

BANK OF ITALY, junction Market, Powell and 
Eddy sts. ; Montgomery Street Branch, S. E. 
corner Montgomery and Clay sts. ; Market- 
Geary Branch, junction Market, Geary and 
Kearny sts.; Mission Branch, 3246 Mission St., 
near 29th st. ; Park-Presidio Branch, Clement 
si. and 9th ave. ; Polk-Van Ness Branch, 1541 
Polk st,; Eureka Valley Branch, junction Mar- 
ket, 17th and Castro sts. ; Sunset Branch, 8th 
ave. and Irving — For the half-year, ending June 
30, 1922, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all sav- 
ings deposits, payable on and after JULY 1, 
192a. Dividends not called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of interest as the principal 
from July 1, 1922. Deposits made to and in- 
cluding July 10, 1922, will earn interest from 
July 1, 1922. P. C. HALE 
Vice-President. 

MERCANTILE TRUST COMPANY 

MERCANTILE TRUST COMPANY, Head of- 
fice, 4 64 California street; Savings Union 
Branch, Market street at Grant avenue and 
O'Farrell street, San Francisco. Also branches 
at Berkeley, California. (Member Federal Re- 
serve System.) For the half year ending June 
30, 1922, a dividend has been declared on sav- 
ings deposits at the rate of Four (4) per cent 
per annum, payable on and after SATURDAY, 
-JULY 1, 1932. A dividend not drawn will be 
added to the deposit account, become a part 
thereof, and earn dividend from July 1, 1922. 
Deposits made on or before July 10, 1922, will 
earn interest from July 1, 1922. 

WILLIAM A. MARCUS, Cashier. 

ITALIAN AMERICAN BANK 
ITALIAN AMERICAN BANK, S. E. corner 
Montgomery and Sacramento sts. ; North Beach 
Branch, corner Columbus ave. and Broadway — 
For the half-year ending June 30, 1922, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of Four (4) 
per cent per annum on all savings deposits, pay- 
able on and after JULY 1, 1923. Dividends not 
called for will be added to the principal and 
bear the same rate of interest from July 1. 1922. 
Deposits made on or before July 10, 1922, will 
earn interest from July 1, 1922. 
A. SBARBORO. President. 

THE FRENCH AMERICAN BANK 

THIS FRENCH AMERICAN BANK (savings 
department), 108 Sutter st. — For the half-year 
ending June 30, 1922, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of Four (4) per cent per an- 
num on all deposits, payable on and after JULY 
1, 1922. Dividends not called for are added to 
and bear the same rate of interest as the princi- 
pal from July 1, 1922. Deposits made on or be- 
fore July 10. 1922, will earn interest from July 
1. 1922. LEON BOCQUERAZ, 
President. 

THE HIHKRMA SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY 

INK HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SO- 
CIBTV, corner Market, McAllister and Jones sts. 
— For the half-year ending June 30. 1922, a 
dividend bJtfl been declared at the rate of Four 

1 i > per cent per annum on ail deposits, pavabie 

"it or all.] .it l.v I. 1022. Dividends not drawn 

will i"- added t<. deposit 

pair thereof, and will earn dividends from July 
i 1922. Deposits made on or before July 
10, 1922, will earn Interest from July 1. 1 

R. M. TOBIX. Secretary. 

KIKst riBDEBAL TRUST COMPANY 
FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY, corner 
Montgomery and Post sis— For the half-year 
ending June SO, 1922, a dividend has been* de- 
clared at the rate of Four (4) per cent per 
annum on all savings deposits, pavabie on and 
II I.V I. IMS, Dividends not called for 
are added to deposit account and earn dividend 
from July 1. 1922. Deposits made on or before 
July 10, 1922, will earn interest from July 1. 
M R CLARK, 

Cashier. 

i \ i<>\ TKI ^T COMPANY OK s \\ 
kk\\( I8CO 
UNION TRUST COMPANY OP SAX FRAN- 
CISCO, Market street at Grant avenue — For the 
iding June 3". 1!*_'2. a dividend haa 
Bd at the rate of Four (4) per cent 
anum on all savings deposits, payable on 
and after SATURDAY, July I, 1922. Dividends 
iled for are added t<- and bear the same 
I interest ,is the principal from July 1. 
!!'.'.• Money deposited on or before Julv In, 

II earn interest from July 1, 

' BP.ICKWEDEL. Cashier. 

III MMDIliT RATINGS IUNK 
HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK. 

Fourth — For the half-year ending 

June -.d has been declared at 

i i per cent per annum on all 

and after July 1. 

1 Ided to and 

■ as the principal 

from Julv 1 - before 

Julv i 1 earn interest from Julv 1. 

H r k: 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July I, 1922 




ociot 




^^> 



Busy Cupid 

AN INTERESTING announcement has 
come from New York in the engage- 
ment of Miss (Catherine Mackay, daughter 
of Mr. Clarence Mackay, and Mr. Kenneth 
O'Brien, son of Mr. and Mrs. Morgan J. 
O'Brien of that city. The future bride is 
the granddaughter of a noted Californian, 
the late Mr. John W. Mackay. Mr. O'Brien's 
mother was Miss Rose Crimmins, a sister of 
Mr. John D. Crimmins, so he is a cousin 
of Mr. Lalor and Mr. Edward Crimmins of 
San Francisco, sons of Mrs. Evans Williams. 
No date has been set for the marriage. 

— Miss Anita Dorothy Berendsen, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Julius Berendsen, will 
be married to John C. Schmidt in August, 
the honeymoon to be passed in Honolulu. 
The engagement was recently announced at 
a reception at the Berendsen home. 

— The Morris H. Marcus home on Clayton 
street was the scene of the wedding of Miss 
Consuelo Swan and Lieutenant Morris H. 
Marcus Jr., U. S. N., which took place on 
Thursday evening. The bride is the daughter 
of Captain and Mrs. Charles S. Swan of 
this city. 

— Miss Helen Crawford and Dr. Lovell 
Langstroth were married last Friday after- 
noon in the garden of Mr. and Mrs. G. E. 
McFarland in San Mateo. Rev. Walter Cam- 
bridge of the Episcopal Church of San Mateo 
read the marriage ritual. The bride was given 
in marriage by her uncle, A. M. Murray of 
Los Angeles. Miss Mary Anne Peters was 
flower girl and Frank Langstroth was best 
man for his brother. The bride is a daughter 
of the late Dr. J. C. Crawford and of Mrs. 
Jennie Price Crawford of Los Angeles. Dr. 
Langstroth is one of the well-known men 
in his profession in this city. Dr. and Mrs. 
Langstroth will go south, returning to make 
their home here. 




The Greatest Value Ever 

Offered the Motor 

World 



Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St 

Telephone Prospect 8800 



— William Shuman, the announcement of 
whose engagement to Miss Cornelia Clam- 
pett came as a complete surprise to society 
recently, gave a stag dinner at one of the 
down town restaurants. 

Luncheons 

— Mrs William Hendrickson Jr. enter- 
tained at a large luncheon Tuesday at the 
home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Seward 
Bailey McNear, in Ross Valley, where she 
and Mr. Hendrickson are passing the sum- 
mer. The guest of honor at the delightful 
affair was Miss Betty Schmeidell, bride-elect 
of Mr. James Moffitt, who was among the 
attendants at the McNear-Hendrickson mar- 
riage on April 30. 

— Wednesday Dr. Harry Tevis entertained 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Politzer at a luncheon 
party at his home at Alma, in the Santa 
Cruz mountains. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John C. Hallonquist (Con- 
stance Lynch) are being entertained during 
their visit here, where they are passing their 
honeymoon. The bride is a daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. John Lynch of Pleyto, Monterey 
County, and with her sister. Miss Helen, oc- 
casionally visits here. Miss Mary Boardman 
is one of the belles who entertained for the 
bride, having a luncheon party at the Wo- 
men's Athletic Club in her honor. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles Butters assembled 
a few friends at luncheon at Roselawn, their 
Piedmont home. Mr. and Mrs. Butters are 
leaving in two weeks for Europe, where they 
will pass the rest of the summer in travel. 

— Mrs. Harold Mann entertained inform- 
ally at luncheon at the Town and Country 
Club for Mrs. Osborne Bland of Kentucky, 
who is visiting her sister, Mrs. Graeme Mac- 
donald, for the summer. 

— Mrs. Orville Pratt Jr. entertained at 
luncheon at the Francesca Club on Monday 
afternoon in honor of Mrs. James Ward 
Keeney and her sister, Mrs. George Hard- 
ing of New York and Philadelphia. 
Teas 

— Miss Lillian Whitney has arrived from 
her home in New York for a two months' 
visit in California. She is at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. Hanson Grubb, the latter of 
whom entertained at a tea Tuesday after- 
noon. The other honor guests were Mrs. 
Jerome Politzer, who, with Mr. Politzer, 
has recently come here to make her home; 
Mrs. Temple Bridgman, who is visiting Mr. 
and Mrs. John Ward Mailliard in Belvedere, 
and Mrs. Warren Smith, who is passing the 
summer with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James 
Otis, at their Broadway home. 

— One of the smart affairs of this week 
will be the reception and tea to be given by 
Mr. and Mrs. George McGowan and Captain 
and Mrs. Peabody Huff in honor of Lieu- 
tenant and Mrs. Lyman K. Swenson on July 
1 at the Fairmont. 



Dinners 

— On Saturday night the Harry Sears 
Bates gave a most enjoyable al fresco party 
on the lawn of the Charles Merrill home at 
Menlo Park, with most of the Menlo Coun- 
try Club element as their guests. Dancing 
on the veranda beguiled the evening away 
merrily. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Julian Thorpe entertained 
the Menlo and Woodside contingent at an 
al fresco dinner, the charming view from the 
veranda adding to the pleasure of the oc- 
casion. 

— Dr. and Mrs. William H. Heinzman, 
who are leaving for a visit of a few weeks 
at Feather River Inn, were hosts at a recent 
dinner party at their home. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Haket Derby gave a din- 
ner last Thursday for Miss Maude Fay and 
her fiance. Captain Powers Symington. Cap- 
tain Symington is out of town on a business 
trip and will be away a week. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Harry Sears Bates were 
dinner hosts Saturday at their home in Burl- 
ingame when they entertained in honor of 
Miss Edith Bull. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Evans Williams will be 
hosts at a dinner dance at their home at 
Menlo Park next Saturday night. 

— Dr. and Mrs. Harry E. Anderson were 
hosts at dinner at their home last Thursday 
evening. 

— In honor of Mrs. Osborne Bland of 
Kentucky, who is visiting her sister, Mrs. 
Graeme Macdonald, in San Francisco, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Whitaker entertained at a 
delightful dinner at their home on Saturday 
evening. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Jean de St. Cyr, who are 
being welcomed upon their return to Cali- 
fornia, entertained informally at dinner at 
their home in Burlingame on Saturday even- 
ing. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker 
were hosts at a dinner party for Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard McCreery and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
Rose Vincent, the two latter families leaving 
in a few days for Europe. 

— Mrs. Florence Porter Pfingst gave a din- 
ner party in honor of General and Mrs. 
Morton at the Fairmont. They leave on Mon- 
day for Alaska. 



Eyeglass Wearers 

are fast abandoning their illogical preju- 
dice against glasses. They are learning 
that pi-Hper glasses are an absolute ne- 
cessity and not a sign of age. Don't be 
indifferent — think — then act. 

W. I'. Fennlmore A. K. Fennimore 

J. W. Davis 




r\\ x 

San Francisco - 181 Pout, 3508 Mlsuloo Sts. 
Berkeley - - - - 2106 Shattuck Avenue 
Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 



July I, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



Theater Party 

— Miss Mary Julia Crocker entertained at 
a theater party Wednesday evening in honor 
of Mr. and Mrs. William Hendrickson Jr. 
In Town and Out 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Hopkins have 
sold their home in Menlo Park and will pass 
the summer in San Francisco at their resi- 
dence in California street. The Hopkins res- 
idence was one of the landmarks of Menlo 
Park. 

— Mrs. Ray Somers has come down from 
her place in Tehama County for several 
days' visit with Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Volk- 
mann at their home on Broadway. Friday 
last, Mr. and Mrs. Volkmann were hosts 
at a small dinner and theater party in her 
honor. 

— Mrs. Paul Wegeforth has arrived from 
her home in Coronado and she is visiting in 
Menlo Park with Mr. and Mrs. Alexander 
Hamilton. 

— Miss Margery Davis arrived Thursday 
at Montecito to pass the summer with her 
mother, Mrs. Norris King Davis. 

— Mrs. Henry Irving Coon has returned 
from Java, where she passed six months with 
Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Winkler, and she has 
joined Mr. Coon at their home in Broadway. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John R. Robertson are 
leaving for the Atlantic Coast the first week 
in July on the way to Europe, where they 
will pass several months. They will first 
visit Mr. Robertson's old home in Glasgow. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Ansel Easton are passing 
several days in town from their ranch on 
Mount Diablo. While in this city they are 
staying at the Fairmont. 

— Mrs. George Boyd has returned to her 
home in San Rafael after a visit with rela- 
tives in Portland. 

—Mr. and Mrs. William Mayo Newhall 
and the Fentress Hill families have gone to 
the Feather River country. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Horace Hill and Mrs. and 
Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz have gone to the Mc- 
Cloud River country. 

— Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton arrived from 
New York where she has been visiting for 
several months. 

—Robert Gay Hooker Jr. returned last 
week from Harvard to pass the summer with 
his parents in San Mateo. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor 
have returned to their home in Piedmont, 
after a fortnight's visit at the Ambassador in 
Los Angeles. With Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Oxnard, Mr. and Mrs. Taylor will leave in 
July for their summer camp on the Feather 
River. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Ray Benjamin and Miss 
Barbara Benjamin have gone to Camp Curry 
for the midsummer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Paul Shoup are leaving 
on the S. S. President Saturday for the Ori- 
ent, taking their children with them. 
Intimations 

— Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Politzer (Augusta 
Foute) are receiving a cordial welcome from 
their friends. This is their first visit here 
here since their marriage in New ^ ork about 
a year ago. Mr. and Mrs. Politzer have been 
living abroad most of the time since them. 



For the present they are at the Fairmont 
Hotel. 

— Miss Edith Grant, who lingered in the 
East to visit the Misses Marianne and Kath- 
erine Kuhn at Sewickly, Pa., will return to 
her home in Burlingame this week. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Philip Hum are receiving 
the congratulations of their friends on the, 
birth of a daughter. The young mother was 
Miss Florence Russell, daughter of Mrs. 
Muriel Atherton Russell of this city and 
granddaughter of Mrs. Gertrude Atherton. 

— Leon Brooks Walker will give a party 
at Pebble Beach over the Fourth for a co- 
terie of the debutantes and their friends. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walker will chaperon the 
party. 

— Mrs. George Boyd returned last week 
from Portland, after an absence of several 
weeks. Mrs. Boyd is confined to her rooms 
at her home, suffering from a broken ankle 
sustained while in the North. 

—Colonel Albert E. Truby, U. S. A., and 
Mrs. Truby, who since their arrival from 
Washington, D. C, several months ago have 
made a host of friends in society here, gave 
a housewarming at their quarters at Letter- 
man Garrison Sunday afternoon. Colonel 
Truby succeeded Colonel James M. Ken- 
nedy in command of Letterman General Hos- 
pital. 

— Count and Countess Andre de Limur 
(Ethel Crocker) sailed from France on Mon- 
day and will arrive in California early in 
July. They have taken the Poniatowski 
house in San Mateo for the season. 



GREAT OPENING DINNER AT CASA 
DEL REY 

Last Saturday the annual opening dinner 
and dance of the Casa del Rey was held. 
Any number of San Franciscans and Pen- 
insula folk drove down for the colorful 
event. Colorful! Well, yes. This season the 
attractive dining room overlooking the sea, 
was turned into a veritable whirl of Paris- 
enne life. Tables were decorated in unique 
manikins, their fou-fou skirts of rainbow 
hue lending a gay note to the ensemble, 
while jolly-looking parrots and huge butter- 
flies made an appropriate background. 
Among those who attended were: General 
and Mrs. T. I. Kirkpatrick, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Caswell, Miss Lerona Beetz. Mr. Sto 
Webster and the Misses Sheila and Sylvia 
Webster. Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Arkush, Mrs. 
C. H. Fields. Major L. R. Greenfield. Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry Wallach and Mr. and Mrs. 
Ralph Miller of Santa Cruz and the city. A 
party of Santa Rosans motored down: B. 
H. Paxton, Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Paxton and 
Mrs. M. E. Cummings. 

There were over 400 at the Saturday 
dinner dance. Many guests are staying over 
for the Fourth of July. 



AT DEL MONTE 
Golf matches for men and women will 
be the outstanding sport feature of Del 
Monte over the Independence Day holiday. 
There will be horseback riding, swimming, 
fishing, tennis and other pastimes to furnish 
diversion to the crowds that will celebrate 



the glorious Fourth at the Monterey resort. 
Among some of those who have made reser- 
vations at Del Monte are Mr. and Mrs. 
William Pierce Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. 
George Keith, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Reiners 
of Fresno, Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Worden, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Folger, Mr. and Mrs. 
J. F. Brooks, Alfred Tubbs and party, W. 
B. Tubbs and party, Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
T. Carroll, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Goodfellow, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Francis Heylan, Mr. Dan 
Murphy and party. 

Preparations are going on for the sum- 
mer polo season, which will open at Del 
Monte next month. Willie Crocker, Harry 
Hunt, Lawrence McCreery and Dick Schwer- 
in are among the young peninsula play- 
ers who are expected to participate in the 
matches. S. F. B. Morse has also been hit- 
ting the ball around, and may find time to 
take a place in the lineup. 



BABYLON 

On the Bay at San Carlos 



The most unique and exclusive re- 
sort for motorists on the Coast 
Babylon's Chicken Maryland 

or Duck Dinners $2.50 

Breakfasts and Lunches at 

Reasonable Prices 

3Ausic and T>ancing Every Night 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eyebrows arched and moles, warts and 
superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest improved multiple needle ma- 
chine. Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 l..ar> Street, Suite 733 Whitney Bldg. 

Phone Douglas 5232 
Oakland. Suite 424, Flr»t Natl. Bank Bldg. 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

Make Your Reservations 
nt City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 

Under Management CARL S. STAXLEY 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

• • « • • • 
PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

• • • • • • 
JEWELS In Platinum 

• • • • • • 
REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

• • • • • • 
UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

• • • • • • 

FINK JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 

• • • • • • 

EXPERT Rppair Work 



I l \ rn COSTUME DKSIG2C — 

Fashion Illustration — Pattern Drafting. 

Millinery Ma kin- gntng 

Work 

<i »»»«•«. i»»> umi Sweatee 

i I SB M>s ICADKHY, lae. 
Prottltih Rite TrmpU - ler St. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 1, 1922 





ITINANCIAU 




By P. N. BERINGER 



THE money situation is very materially 
improved and money is much easier 
with the banks than it has been for months. 
The tendency, too, is toward a more liberal 
policy toward those who would make loans. 
Retail trade in San Francisco and in almost 
every other metropolitan center is improv- 
ing and taking on a brisk tone, despite the 
fact that this time of the year is usually a 
business lull. 

* « * 

John Perrin, chairman of the Federal Re- 
serve Bank for the Twelfth Reserve district, 
is authority for the statement that, except in 
the case of auto tires and shoes, there has 
been an increase in trade in San Francisco 
in all lines. He reports a steady increase in 
the production of lumber in his district. Cop- 
per mines have resumed production and sev- 
eral are now in operation. During the pres- 
ent year each month's production of pe- 
troleum in California has exceeded that of 
the previous month. The increased sales of 
electric power shows that there has been a 
very material increase in industrial activity 
and necessarily this goes to show that there 
must have been a corresponding increase in 
prosperity for our manufacturers. 

Building activity continues at record fig- 
ures. The building permits issued during 
May and June have been phenomenally large 
in number. The month of May has never 
been exceeded, in permits granted, except by 
the month of October, 1921. Business fail- 
ures are decreasing in number. It will easily 
be seen that this is a very good showing for 
the district and also for San Francisco and 
it is something which should be very com- 
forting to those who have been having a 
somewhat hard time of it in a business way. 

It pays to be funny. The humorist, John 
Kendrick Bangs, left an estate valued at 
$40,000. The best part of this consisted in 
rights and credits, which will go far to com- 
fort the widow. 

* * * 

The close relationship between agricultural 
production and finance is shown in the trip 
to this country by Sir C. Paul Chatter from 
India, purposely to see Luther Burbank and 
to confer with him concerning creations in 
agriculture and horticulture. Sir Chatter is 
one of the big figures in Indian financial 

circles. 

* * * 

The war in China is assuming a more 
comforting stage, as far as the rest of the 
world is concerned, with every day passing 
by. General Wu Pei Fu is making good 
progress, with the help of the re-instated 
president of the republic, in creating a united 
China. Sun Yat Sen seems to be the ir- 



reconcilable party and, despite the reports 
of his capture, he is now reported as massing 
troops from three directions against Canton. 
Press correspondents say that he has the best 
of it and that he will take Canton and, if 
this does happen, it will mean a renewal 
of difficulties. Peace in China is essential 
as one of the factors to bring prosperity to 
the world at large. It had been hoped that 
Sun had been permanently retired by the 
force of circumstances and by detention on 
a war ship. 

The red revolution that has governed Her- 
rin. III., is only one sample of union labor's 
acts when it has the opportunity and the 
strength to defy constituted government. It 
is more than probable that no effort will be 
made to bring a whole community to justice 
for its murderous crimes and the blame lies 
entirely with the police authorities of Herrin 
and with the sheriff of the county, who is 
reported to have refused to interfere or to 
call for troops to maintain the public order 
he apparently could not himself maintain and 
which he is reported to have made no effort 
to maintain. The men and the women of 
Herrin, in this instance, acted like crazed 
wild animals and the worst of it is that they 
are proud of it. The people of the State of 
Illinois should hang their heads in shame. 

Foreign Minister Rathenau of Germany, 
who was ruthlessly assassinated by what is 
supposed to have been the agents of the roy- 
alist group was a very able and constructive 
statesman. He was a Socialist in politics and 
a thinker of no mean calibre. His death is 
not only a loss to Germany and the Ger- 
man Republic, but a loss to the world. His 
Socialism was very much akin to what might 
be termed democratism in this country and 
was not at all of the fire-brand order. It 
is hoped that those responsible for his death 
will be brought to a speedy trial and pun- 
ished for their crime. 

* * * 

The killing of a capitalist or the blowing 
up of a socialist leader proves nothing at 
all except the criminal stupidity of the per- 
petrators of the crime. The cause for which 
such crimes are usually committed is not ad- 



vanced but violently set back and it takes 
months and years for the leaders to gain 
what is lost through such violent measures. 
If it is true that Rathenau's death was con- 
nived at by the militarist royalist faction 
then it may be assumed this faction has not 
learned anything at all, as the lesson of the 
war. 

President Harding is trying very hard to 
compose the quarrel between the coal miners 
on strike and the operators. So far the strike, 
outside of the terrible things happening at 
strike centers, such as the wholesale tortures 
and murders by union men and their women 
at Herrin, has not worked any very great 
hardship on the world at large. It is time 
now that something be done to bring the con- 
tending parties to a just settlement of their 
dispute. If the President is unable to make 
the leaders on both sides see the light then 
it will probably be necessary to have Uncle 
Sam operate the mines with whatever labor 
is best obtainable. 

We regret to have to record the death 
of Samuel Napthaly, vice-president of the 
Great Western Power Co. Mr. Napthaly 
was well known and well liked and his pass- 
ing away was most untimely as he was but 
forty-seven years of age. He was born in 
San Francisco and was graduated from the 
University of California as an electrical en- 
gineer. Electrical engineering and power 
producing was the aim on his business ex- 
istence and he was identified successfully 
with several companies in turn. Mr. Napthaly 
will be mourned by many who knew him 
well and the sympathies of the community 
go to his widow and daughter and sister. 
* * * 

The Osaka Shosen Kaisha has decided to 
establish regular sailings from San Francisco 
for Bombay and Calcutta every 45 days. If 
the trade develops additional sailings will 
be made later on. It will be curious to note 
whether this Japanese line makes a success 
of this route after the failure of the Ship- 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

352 Bush Street 
Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco. Cal. 



OFFICES FOR RENT 

Board of Trade Building, 444 Market St. 

Extra large, three connecting rooms, containing 1500 s<i. ft., suitable for cor- 
poration or Manufacturers' Agent. Reasonable rental. 

J. L.AKBNER, AGENT 

r.x BUTTER STREET — ROOM til 



July I. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



15 



ping Board to develop anything like ade- 
quate business on the same route. 

The intercoastal business of steamship 
companies engaged in that traffic has in- 
creased so very rapidly that it is now a ques- 
tion of making room for the freight going 
either way. It is prosperous times for the 
steamship companies plying vessels between 
San Francisco and the Atlantic ports. 

The Silver Pick Red Top lease continues 
with its splendid results and shipments are 
being made with regularity to the mill. It 
has become one of the great activities of 
Goldfield and with production maintained 
and increased may be reckoned as a big pro- 
ducer in the future. 



Collision Insurance Gives Collision Protection 



A STATE-WIDE ASSOCIATION DINNER 



Annual Gathering of the Pacific Service Em- 
ployes at the Auditorium 



Twenty-five hundred members of Pacific 
Service Employe Association, an organiza- 
tion whose membership is composed entirely 
from the ranks of Pacific Gas and Electric 
Company employes, gathered at the San 
Francisco Exposition Auditorium on the even- 
ing of Saturday, June 24, for the annual 
banquet of the association. They came from 
all parts of the "Pacific Service" territory, 
extending from the mountains of Shasta 
County to Fresno on the south, and on the 
east to the summit of the Sierra Nevada 
mountains. The auditorium was a blaze of 
color for the occasion, decorations left over 
from the Shriners convention helping out the 
display. At the long tables, which stretched 
to every corner of the room, the employes 
were seated by geographical divisions, and 
it is worthy to note that each was adequately 
represented regardless of the long distances 
some of the men and women had to travel. 
An excellent dinner and fine program of en- 
tertainment was followed by speeches. Gen- 
eral Manager John A. Britton introducing 
President W. E. Creed, who called attention 
to the fact that California has room for 
ten times its present population. Its resources 
are sufficient for a tenfold increase in in- 
dustrial development. "We are too prone," 
he said, "to think that our future is assured 
because we have enormous natural advan- 
tages in forests, fisheries, minerals, land, cli- 
mate and a commanding position on the. 
great Pacific. These possessions alone will 
not build the Western empire we dream of. 
We must hitch intelligent human effort to 
our natural advantages. 

"The policies we adopt will have a pro- 
found effect upon the growth of the State. 
Our public policies will be most effective 
if they seek through the advantages of col- 
lective effort to bring about a timely and 
orderly development in all our activities, and 
avoid the folly of attempting to stimulate 
advance in one direction by stifling advance 
in another. If we are sound and intelligent 
in what we do, the progress of our great 
State will go forward without interruption." 




NIAGARA Fire Insurance Company 

EDWIN PARRISH, Manager 
Pacific Coast Department 334 Pine St., San Francisco Calif. 



National Ice Cream Co. 

Preferred Stock Dividend No. 6 

June 14, 1922 

The Board of Directors lias this day declared 
the pegular quarterly dividend of $2.00 
per share on the preferred stuck <>i the com- 
pany, payable July 1. 1 ( >22. to the stockhold- 
ers of record at the close of business June 
25. l'»22. 

( i. I ). Stratton. Secretary. 



MILLS & HAGBOM 

(Hailnrs 

New Location, ALEXANDER BUILDING 
155 Montgomery St., Cor. Bush 



REDWOOD LODGE and BUNGALOWS 

IN T11K BKABT (II Till -IMI ( HI 7 MOIST Ui»8 — E»f b lfatm d 

i HllMWTIl RESORT FOR WUX-IND IJID PERMANENT i.ll-r tSMol- luK 

HOSPITALITY GOOD MEALS ISD t \ IKITHIM illol K l.Kl\ K OVER Mil LOI 

OATOS-SANTA mi/ HK.im AT — oris Till \ I \K Kill so 

,-k Vm 9 V Itak*l Icrnl: >fr IVck-4ncl»l l.i-kM >!.. -an r ranci-ci.. or ( rabtrr*'. 

Oakland, or iHnn A. P. 1 OX. I'r..p., » KH.IIT-. i VI 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 1. 1922 




PL/DASURD'S WAND 



Last Week of "The Circle" at Century 

It is a misfortune that the season's most 
delightful production cannot be kept on for 
a several weeks' run. The throng being 
turned away from the box office is ample 
tribute to the popularity of Mrs. Carter and 
John Drew. 

They are giving us a delightful treat in 
their presentation of Maugham's great com- 
edy, having support quite adequate to main- 
tain the standard of their own excellence. 
This play had a long run back East and 
after a short vacation for the actors is to 
be continued in Chicago, though it would 
be a' safe venture for further showing right 
here. The artistry of Mr. Drew has never 
reached greater heights than in his portrayal 
of the cynical Lord Porteous, while Mrs. 
Carter's Lady Kitty could not be touched 
by contemporary talent. These two weeks 
will stand out as the high light of the pres- 
ent year. 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

fectly and gives all of his best dramatic 
qualities full play. Severi plays several se- 
lections from Victor Herbert's opera, "The 
Fortune Teller." 




Artists at Orpheum 

Leo Carrillo has had a finger in all the 
art-pies; with his clever pencil he made a 
name for himself in the field of caricature; 
then he took to acting, and his work as 
monologist, mimic, comedian, has placed him 
high up in the ranks. This week at the 
Orpheum Carrillo character studies form one 
of the best bits of a very fine program. 
Skeet Gallagher and Irene Martin deserve 
the name of artists, too, and in "Smithie" 
show their real ability to entertain. A young 
violinist of rare talent is Kerejarto, whose 
playing of "The Witches Dance" and Schu- 
bert's "Ave Marie" quite took his hearers 
off their feet. Harry Carroll's revue, with 
its songs, dances and pretty girls, is rollick- 
ing through its second week. Gladys Gerrish 
and Paul Murray do some clever impersona- 
tions and imitations. Mr. and Mrs. Karsey 
give an exhibition on a novel musical in- 
strument they call the "myriophone," and 
Fred Sumner's sketch, "The Show Off," is 
an amusing burlesque. 



California 

George Ade has written a screen story. 
"Our Leading Citizen" is good comedy in 
Ade's best vein, and the sub-titles to the 
tale bear the unmistakable mark of the fa- 
mous humorist's hand. Wingfield, Ind., is 
the background for the picture, and the ma- 
terial furnished is well handled by the popu- 
lar actor, Thomas Meighan, in the title role, 
and his extraordinarily fine company, which 
includes pretty Lois Wilson, burly Theodore 
Roberts and Sylvia Ashton, as well as Guy 
Oliver, Charles Ogle, Lucien Littlefield, Ethel 
Wales and Laurence Wheat. With such a 
group of actors and actresses, plus a play of 
real merit, the result is certain to be success- 
ful. Meighan has a part in Dan Bentley, a 
lazy lawyer of Winfield, that suits him per- 



Portola 

The Portola is given over to comedy com- 
pletely, it would seem. "The Cradle Buster" 
with Glenn Hunter to keep the fun (lowing, 
and Bobby Vernon in "The Hickory Hick" 
are the two chief features, and both are 
successful laugh producers. A scenic film 
adds interest to the bill, and Wood's orches- 
tra is a valuable asset. 



Alcazar 

Herbert Heyes makes his first appearance 
this week as leading man in "Blind Youth." 
There has been considerable criticism heaped 
upon the young gentleman because he has 
been in Hollywood six years and, so to speak, 
has not yet shed all the celluloid briars 
which characterize the movie actor. In the 
first of the three acts one easily believed he 
was all the spouters claimed, but the second 
act showed improvement and in the last 
spasm of the quite tame play he rose to all 
the occasion there was and did very credit- 
ably. By next week he should be going 
strong. Unfortunately, Mr. Heyes is not po- 
sessed of the robust voice one associates 
with so manly a figure, but he may improve 
even that when more familiar with the thea- 
ter. 

Gladys George looks as charming as ever 
and Ben Erway does a nasty part with his 
usual smoothness. Brady Kline is mighty 
funny, till he laughs at himself; possibly 
he, too, will improve — with plenty of time. 
Other members of the company do their 
best to make a superficial play worth list- 
ening to. 



"Mr. Pirn" a Favorite at Columbia 

The gentle whimsicalities of absent- 
minded old Mr. Pirn, with their disastrous 
and far-reaching result, are upholding the 
Columbia's standard of high-class comedy. 
"Mr. Pirn Passes By" caught the fancy of 
London and New York and now has San 
Francisco laughing. The author, A. A. 
Milne, has an utterly delicious vein of hu- 
mor, and the play is excellently well done 
in every respect, the parts being cast with 
unerring good judgment. It is nearly always 
a wise director who gives the English char- 
acter to the English actors; the Americans 
are apt to do better work when confined to 
their own nationality. This play will be in 
our midst for the rest of the current week 
only. It is indeed to be regretted that such 
shows are not more frequent. 



Strand 

Owing to the crowds that flock to see 
Mark Twain's comedy, "The Connecticut 



Yankee," the management is retaining this 
uproarious film for another week. Every 
reel is chock full of laughs and the cast is 
very capable. There has been no saving in 
expense in the production and throughout 
careful direction is evident. In addition to 
the excellent feature, Fitzpatrick offers 
some delightful musical numbers and the 
usual short fill-ins round out the bill. 



Tivoli 

"Sonny" is being retained for an additional 
showing. This picture stars Richard Barthel- 
mes and, while not his best, has many good 
points and very careful direction. A touch 
of the great war, pathos and a good sup- 
porting cast make it one of the season's 
best offerings. Mabel Normand has also been 
held over in her "Head Over Heels" Italian- 
American scramble. Marcelli and his mu- 
sicians do their customary high class of work 
and there is a special current topic reel. 



Imperial 

"My Old Kentucky Home" at the Imperial 
Theater is brought up to date in such a man- 
ner as to furnish real pleasure from every 
standpoint. Aside from the story itself there 
is atmosphere to the play, and it is evident 
that extreme care was exercised in selecting 
the locations for the various scenes. The 
types of old homes and surrounding country 
used as background impart realism to the 
film and goes far to enhance its enjoyment. 

The Kentucy Derby is shown — shown 
just as real as it is — and the horses racing 
give all the excitement of a real race track. 
The race is one of the big features of the 
picture and is alone well worth seeing. The 
music by Prior and his orchestra is as en- 
joyable as ever. 



Granada 

There is something in the performance at 
the Granada that will appeal to everyone, 
not matter how exacting the taste. 

The leading photoplay "The Wall Flower" 
affords the little star. Colleen Moore, wide 



SAM FBAMCISCO 



m N/woti\u.fe 




I 



MA ™f s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Loges 



July I, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



17 



latitude, as she is just as clever as the neg- 
lected, sensitive little nobody, who always 
finds herself without a dancing partner and 
is the general joke of the dance floor. It is 
a strict melodrama type; the story is a good 
one and is certainly a thriller. 

The musical program is one of the most 
interesting yet presented by Paul Ash. 



"Main Street" at Alcazar 

"Main Street," a dramatization of the 
book, which is the year's "best seller," will 
be the Alcazar's next offering, beginning 
Sunday matinee, July 2. As great and as 
human as is the book, the play is greater and 
more appealing. 

The management believes that no more 
worthy vehicle could have been found for 
the second week of the starring engagement 
of Herbert Heyes. Gladys George will play 
opposite him and the cast will be in every 
way a notable one. 



Pacific Players 

The Pacific Players, under the direction of 
Nathaniel Anderson, are announcing their 
sixth production of the season. These play- 
ers choose one-act plays that please the best 
taste of the general public. Their perfor- 
mances so far have been accredited as well 
worth while. 



Orpheum's New Bill 

Mildred Harris will be topliner on the 
Orpheum bill next week. Other favorites 
are: Leo Carrillo, start of "Lombardi, Ltd."; 
Kerekjarto, the sensational royal genius of 
the violin; Flo Lewis, dainty, peppy com- 
edienne; Barnes & Moyer; Bill Robinson, 
dancing act; Martin & Moore, exceptional 
aerialists, and Chong and Rose Moey, in 
American songs and dances. 



A WELL DESERVED HONOR 

Mrs. I. Lowenberg, prominent local club 
woman, who wrote "The Voices," has been 
honored by the League of American Pen 
Women. 

At the recent convention of the organiza- 
tion, held in Washington, D. C, Mrs. Low- 
enberg was appointed a member of the fel- 
lowship fund committee, of which Mrs. Louis 
Geldert, the national president, is chairman. 

This fund has been created to commemo- 
rate the Silver Jubilee of women writers, 
and to assist new writers in getting their 
manuscripts before publishers. 

In the literary world this appointment is 
one of distinction, and Mrs. Lowenberg is 
being congratulated by her colleagues. 



AN IRRESISTIBLE APPEAL 

Unchangeable as the laws of the Medes 
and Persians, is the law of the Fairmont 
Hotel that the service and cuisine shall be 
the best money can buy, and perfect man- 
agement can secure. Sunday dinner in the 
beautiful Venetian dining room of the Fair- 
mont Hotel and music by Rudy Seiger's re- 
inforced orchestra has an irresistible appeal 
to those who can enjoy the best. The charge 
is $1.75. 



LILLIAN RUSSELL'S WIT 

The great beauty's ready wit and ability 
to turn every incident, no matter how ser- 
ious, into a humorous vein is illustrated by 
the apt answer she gave a reporter some 
years ago who came to interview her at the 
time when an attempt was made upon the 
life of Russell Sage. "What would you do, 
Miss Russell," asked the cub, "if a man 
threw a bomb at you?" "No man would 
throw a bomb at me," she replied. "He 
would throw a kiss." 

She enjoyed jokes about her own age. 
At a reception a well known dowager stood 
admiring the golden tresses and peach bloom 
complexion of the guest of honor and then 
finally approached her most timidly. 

"Miss Russell, I have admired you for 
many years," she said, "and have always 
desired to meet you since Due time when I 
was a little girl and my mother took me to 
hear you at the Casino in 'The Grand 
Duchess.' " 

"It is so kind of you to say such sweet 
things," said Miss Russell, ""but you have 
made a grave mistake. That was my grand- 
mother you heard. We both had the same 
name and looked very much alike." 



FOR PRESERVATION OF LAW AND 
ORDER 

The offer of $5000 reward by the Union 
Plant Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp. for in- 
formation that will lead to the arrest and 
conviction of parties that shot, or were re- 
sponsible for the shooting, of Peter Logan 
on Saturday, June 1 7, is the right way to 
bring the culprits within the clutches of the 
law. Employers should begin to realize that 
they must not only apprehend, but prosecute 
criminals in San Francisco. The telephone 
number of the Union Plant Bethlehem Ship- 
building Corp. is Market 3200. Law and 
order must be preserved and the citizens 
must preserve it, if the paid authorities will 
not. 



We used to be scared to death when a 
man reached for his hip pocket — now we 
are tickled to death! — Judge. 



THE NEWS LETTER DID IT 

The indignant protest of the Fire Under- 
writers of San Francisco against the rein- 
statement of a civil service burglar in the 
Fire Department is a result of the News 
Letter's expose of the discreditable political 
move. Two months ago the News Letter 
showed up the negligence of the city at- 
torney's office in allowing the Honora 
Sharpe donation of $40,000 to Golden Gate 
Park to remain uncollected for seventeen 
years. The $40,000 has been paid into the 
public treasury, thanks to the News Letter's 
efforts. 



EXTRA TRAINS 



NORTHWESTERN 
PACIFIC 

SATURDAY, JULY 1st 

Extra train will leave San Francisco 
at 4:45 P. M. for Russian River 
points. 

TUESDAY, JULY 4th 

Boats and trains will run on Sunday 
schedule with additional trains leaving 
Glen Ellen at 8:30 P. M., arriving 
San Francisco 1 1 P. M., and leaving 
Pt. Reyes 8 P. M., arriving San Fran- 
cisco 9:52 P. M. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 5th 

Extra train will leave Monte Rio 5 : 36 
A. M., Guerneville 5:53 A. M., arriv- 
ing San Francisco 9:05 A. M. 

For further particulars phone 

Kearny 4980 or 
Sutter 5500 



Fire, 


Earthquake, Automobile, Use and Occupancy, Riot and Civil Commotion, 


Explosion, 




Plate Glass, Fidelity and Surety Bond 








INSURANCE 








THE LONDON & LANCASHIRE INSURANCE CO., Ltd. 








LONDON, BNOl imi ■Morporatad i»«l 






ORIENT Insurance Co. of Hartford, Conn. LAW UNION & ROCK Insurance Co., 


Ltd. 




In. (orpamtod 186? of London — Poudod i*"' ; 






LONDON & LANCASHIRE INDEMNITY COMPANY of America 








OrKnnirrcl iimli-r 111.' lawa of Uu Btata "f >.'« York — Inrnrunrateil January. 


1913 






Pacific Department: 332 Pine Street, San Francisco, Calif. 








Geo. Ormond Smith, Manager 







THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire In-uranre Company in America" 

FIRE. AUTOMOBILE. WINDSTORM. 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



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FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklfn and Gouglt 
Telephone Park 271 



"SAVE YOUR TEETH" 

SPONGY. BLEEDING AND SORE 
GUMS ARE WARNINGS OF 

PYORRHEA 

Treat yourself at home with 

PYRO-VOID 

• Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 

Package with directions postpaid 
for $1.00 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

908 Market Street, at Powell 
San Francisco 

Please mention News Letter 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIA1TY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. Leidesdorff 



Dr. Susan Harris Hamilton 

OSTEOPATH 
SPECIALIZING in NERVOUS DISEASES 

ST. PAUL BLDG. 291 GEARY ST. 

Hours — 10 a.m. to 12 m.. 2 to 4 p.m. 
Phones — Douglas 226, Prospect 15 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

The Automobile 



July 1, 1922 



Watch the Exhaust 

The engineer of a large factory will fre- 
quently glance up at the smoke-stack, for 
he knows that if there is excessive smoking 
he is not securing the full benefit of the fuel 
he burns. The motorist should likewise watch 
the smoke-stack of his car, for the exhaust 
also indicates, to a certain extent, what is 
taking place inside the cylinders. An engine 
operating at its greatest efficiency will pro- 
duce no smoke. Black smoke from the ex- 
haust indicates too rich a mixture — a waste 
of fuel. Blue smoke indicates over-lubrica- 
tion — a waste of oil. Gray smoke indicates 
a combination of the two. If blue smoke 
pours in a steady stream from the exhaust 
it shows that all the cylinders are receiving 
too much oil, usually due to an excessive 
high oil level in the crankcase. If the car is 
an old one, it may mean that new piston 
rings are needed or that the cylinders are 
worn out of round, causing the pistons to 
pump oil. If the car has just been overhauled 
it may mean that the new piston rings have 
not, as yet, worn to a good seat. If the 
smoke issues irregularly, it indicates that one 
or more cylinders are receiving too much 
oil; defective piston rings or scored cylinders 
may be suspected. 



I Engine Paint 

Some engines we see are covered with oil 
and grease, others are red with rust. Neither 
is admired by the particular driver. The 
best-appearing engine is the painted one. A 
good light-colored paint may be made with 
the following ingredients: Linseed oil, 12 
parts; white lead, 16 parts; lamp black, I 
part; and turpentine, 4 parts, measured by 
weight. Before using this paint, the engine 
must first be cleaned with gasoline to re- 
move the oil and grease, and then washed 
with soda water. 



A heavy rubber band or a piece of inner 
tube placed about the handles of a pair of 
pliers affords a simple means of holding 
them to any part, when the hand is removed. 

This expedient is of use when small pins 
such as valve keys are to be held in the 
pliers, when replacing springs in gas en- 
gine valves, or when replacing split cotter 
pins in places where the fingers cannot reach. 



A poor family unexpectedly came into 
possession of a fortune. They purchased a 
farm, with hens, cows and pigs. One day 
a little daughter of the family was showing 
a visitor about the place. 

"Do your hens lay many eggs?" he asked. 

"Oh, they can," was the haughty reply, 
"but in our position they don't have to." — 
Toronto Telegram. 



BELVEDERE 

Kent or Sell — Attractive Home 

Bight Rooms, Two Baths, Furnished 

SAN GERONIMO 

Delightful Home, Furnished — Six rooms, 
two baths, old ivory finish throughout; 
stream, rustic bridges. Redwoods. 

APPLY DR. B. W. HAINES 

Dousrlas 2433 323 Geary St., San Francisco 




WE KNOW HOW 

Your car is piling up a big repair bill 
every mile you drive without proper 
lubrication. You can depend upon 

LOYAL AND EFFICIENT SERVICE 
at the 

DE LUXE GARAGE & SERVICE STATION 

Post and Hyde Sts. Phone Franklin 3 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which Is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1 174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Watch Your Feet 




Weak, fallen or broken arches reduce 
your efficiency, cause headache, back- 
ache, sciatica, pelvic and stomach trou- 
ble, as well as other ailments. 

THE POST SYSTEM 

for foot correction restores the flexi- 
bility and resiliency of the feet. 

The Post System for Foot Correction 
259 Geary Street, San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6147 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1S17) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept., 1921 




.$ 25,000,000.00 
.. 17,500,000.00 



25,000,000.00 



.$ 67,500,000.00 



$359,326,760.00 

OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

359 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, 

Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of 

Australasian Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of Calif., National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bk., Crocker Nat'l Bk. 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31st, 1921 

Assets $ 71,851,299.62 

Deposits - - 68,201,299.62 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds .... 2,650,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund ------ 371,753.46 

A Dividend of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4H ) per cent per annum wai 
declared for the six months ending December 31, 1921. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 

RECOMMENDS 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco. Calif. 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3 4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Vp Capitol SI. - .. 000. 000 Totnl Asset* 0»«T S4-9.000.000 $15,000,000 Bill 111 III Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

4S5 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENC: NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.: SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STRUT 
BRVCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. OOULTHARD, Assistant Manager 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 
of Automobiles 



We Stand for the Best In Business 
Training 



Munson tjfP !«/§)] School 

VI 

For 
PRIVATE SECRETARIES 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 
Send for Catalog 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.).... 75c 

Dinner. Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. .$1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



When You Need a New Battery 



and want greater power, endurance and 
dependability, we have a Prest-O-Lite 
Battery of correct size, capacity and 
strength for your car, whatever make 
or model you drive — an honest battery 
backed by the pioneer service to mo- 
torists. 

Your car will perform better, and 
will give you more pleasure and satis- 
faction in driving, when you have a 
Prest-O-Lite Battery to turn over your 
engine and to keep your lights burning 
brightly. 

Every Prest-O-Lite Battery is made 
to stand the strain under all kinds of 
traffic, weather and road conditions. 




Its rugged construction, unaffected 
by jolts and jars — its wonderful re- 
cuperative powers, affording quick re- 
covery after every start — explain its 
adoption by many large motor car 
manufacturers as standard equipment 
on hundreds of thousands of cars. 

We extend to you a cordial invita- 
tion to make use of Prest-O-Lite Ser- 
vice — whatever car you drive — what- 
ever make of battery you have now. 
We can and will prolong the life of 
any battery. 

Repairs and recharging at reason- 
able rates. No charge, of course, for 
testing. 




Distributors 



EARL P. COOPER, Inc. 



1336 Post Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 






qM 



STORAGE BATTERY 



Casa Del Rey 



SANTA CRUZ 



CALIFORNIA 



The ^Million 'Dollar Fireproof Hotel 



THE ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm 
beach bathing; dancing; good music; artistic, home-like 
spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place Tor children. Beautiful 
playgrounds; sanitary warm bathing pool; swimming 
instructors; saddle ponies for children. Special kitchen- 
ette in hotel proper where maid can prepare food for 
young children. 

Complete highways, through the most beautiful sec- 
tion of California. (Only 80 miles.) The Southern Pa- 
cific offers unusually low rates from all California points; 
the warmest and most accessible beach out of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also 
under the same management as Casa Del Rey. 

Correspondence about rates for families with maids 
and children solicited. Special rates by the week or for 
extended stays of a month or two. Address: 



CASA DEL REY : : SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 

MORRIS & WARNER, Proprietors. Phone 600 



Back East 
Excursions 

Tickets on Sale 




daily until Aug. 31 

Final Return Limit 
Oct. 31, 1922 



«fl> OO.UU andfrehirn 

$1 4 H 4 A New York 
L^bi .^U and return 

Proportionately low fares to other 
points. 

Liberal stopovers and choice of routes 
going and returning. 

For additional information, fares, train 
service, etc. 



See Agent 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC LINES 
50 Post St Ferry Station Third St. Station 

Sutter 4000 




PRICE 10 CENTS - $5 no PER YFAR 

TAX PAYERS WEEKLY $S00PERYEAR 



■■■■■■■ 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, JULY 8, 1922 



— b^— — 
LOS ANGELES 






STATEMENT 

Of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities of 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

HIBERNIA BANK 

Dated San Francisco, June 30, 1922 



ASSETS 

1 — Bonds of the United States ($12,699,- 
900.00), of the State of California 
and the Counties, Cities and School 
Districts thereof ($16,946,825.00), 
of the State of New York ($2,149,- 
000.00), of the City of New York ($1,- 
000,000.00), of the State of Massa- 
chusetts ($1,162,000.00), of the State 
of Nevada ($100,000.00), of the State 
of Michigan ($60,000.00) of the State 
of Oregon ($51,000.00) , of the County 
of Bergen, N. J. ($180,000.00), of 
the County of Cuyahoga. Ohio ($46,- 
000.00), of the City of Chicago. 111. 
($643,000.00), of the City of Phila- 
delphia, Penn. ($350,000.00), of the 
City of Cincinnati. Ohio ($250,000.- 
00), of the City of Cleveland, Ohio 
($205,000.00). of the City of Al- 
bany, N. Y. ($200,000.00). of the 
City of St. Paul, Minn. ($100,000.00) 
of the City of San Antonio. Texas 
($62,000.00), of the City of Jersey 
City, N. J. ($50,000.00), of the City 
of Detroit, Mich. ( $50,000.00), of the 
City of Dayton, Ohio ($25,000.00). 
the actual value of which is .$86,505,448, 

2 — Miscellaneous Bonds, comprising Steam 
Railway Bonds ($1,768,000.00), 
Street Railway Bonds ($994,000,00 1. 
Quasi-Public Corporation Bonds ($2,- 
255,000.00). the actual value of 
which is 4,561,280. 

S — Cash on Hand 3,229,482. 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts there- 
by secured, the actual value of which 

is 31,896,298. 

Said Promissory Notes are all ex- 
isting Contracts, owned by said Cor- 
poration and tlie payment thereof is 
cured by First Mortgages on Real Es- 
tate within this State, and the States 
of Oregon. Nevada and Washington. 

5— Promissory Notes and the debts there- 
by secured, the actual value of which 

is 

Said promissory Notes are all ex- 
isting Contracts, owned by said Cor- 
poration, and are payable to it at its 



office, and the payment thereof is se- 
cured by pledge of Bonds and other 
securities. 

6 — (a) Real Estate situate in the City 
and County of San Francisco ($456,- 
636.22), and in the Counties of Ala- 
meda ($13,525.77), San Mateo 
($2.00). Contra Costa ($31,891.14), 
Monterey ($65,203.13), and San Luis 
Obispo ($93,147.33). in this State, 

the actual value of which is 

(I)) The Land and Building in which 
said Corporation keeps its said office, 
the actual value of which is 



000,405.50 



07:8,241.13 



TOTAL ASSETS $77,205,406.04 



LIABILITIES 

-Said Corporation owes Deposits 

amounting to and the actual value of 

which is $78,624,882.80 

-Reserve Fund 8,671,164.64 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



.477,295,496.04 



J<> 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

By E. .1. TOB1N. President. 
THE HIBERNIA SAYINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

By D. J. BUCKLEY. Acting Secretary 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco — ss. 



Hi 



169,890.00 



K. .1. TOBIN and D. .1 BUCKLEY, being each duly 
sworn, each for himself says That said E, .1. TOBIN is 
President and that said D. J. Bucklev is Acting Secretary 
of the HIBERNIA SAYINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the 
Corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing 
statement is true. 

E. J. TOBIN. President. 

D. J. Bl'CKLEY. Acting Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of 

July. 11.22. 

CHAS T STANLEY. 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco. State of California. 




SAVINGS 



COMMERCIAI 



i.VFK DEPOS 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK 

FOUNDED I860 JUNE SO, 1082 

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 

This STATEMENT is so arranged that it can be easily understood by everyone. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK 

owes Depositors $10,030,433.42 

These deposits represent the 
combined deposits of our Sav- 
ings and Commercial Depart- 
ments. To secure these de- 
posits, our investments are 
so made as to give diversi- 
fied assets. Most of these can 
be quickly turned into cash. 
Our ASSETS and INVEST- 
MENTS are: 
1 — Casli on hand mid in banks.. 1,844,452.17 
Gold, currency, silver, checks 
and money o i hand and on 
deposit with authorized de- 
positories payable on demand. 

2 — Loans on Real Estate 6,060,653.74 

These consist of First Mort- 
gages on California Real Es- 
tate — in no case exceeding 60 
per cent of the conservative 
value of the property. 

3 — Loans on Stocks and Bonds 1,561, 845. GI 
Payable generally within six 
months and amply secured by 
high-grade Stocks and Bonds. 

4 — other Loans 1,230,397.01 

Some secured — others for busi- 
ness purposes payable gen- 
erally within three months. 
5 — Lomis to States. Counties 

and Cities 680,280.01 

In the United States, having 
a small debt and a popula- 
tion of over 20.000. 



6 — United Slates Liberty and 

Victory Bonds if 1,003,157.63 

7 — Bonds of States, Counties 

and Cities 4,010,597.27 

In the United States. 

8 — Other Bonds 2,447,550.04 

Mostly Public Utilities. Gen- 
erally underlying and easily 
salable. 

9 — Bank Premises l,000,ooo.oo 



10 — Other Real Estate.. 



29.529.54 



98,746.80 



11 — Armor Plate Safe Deposit 

Vaults 

Protected by electric burglary 
alarm system and located on 
the ground floor. 

Making Total Assets of S2 1 ,1 39,2 19.09 

12 — Leaving » difference of $ 1,830,790.48 

which represents — ■ 

Capital: 1,200,000.00 



Surplus 

Undivided Profits ... 

These sums represent the 
Sti pi 'k holders' guarantee to 
the depositors, and constitute 
the basis on which we build 
and will continue t<> build a 
sound and complete bank, with 
Savings. Commercial. Trust • 
and Safe Deposit Depart- 
nu'iits. 



50,000.00 

80,790. 



Our BONDS and our BUILDINGS have a greater market value Mian the amount shown on 
tliis Statement. This Bank lias been in business since November 24, 1809. During that time we 
have made many thousands of friends, which fact is one of our most valuable assets. The 
Board of Directors, the Ollieers and Employees are endeavoring to maintain and develop that 
good will by rendering good, efficient and courteous service. 



OFFICERS 

Alexander D. Keyes President 

Wm. H. Crocker Vice-President 

W. A. Frederick Vice-President 

H. C. Klevesahl Secretary and Cashier 

Paul A. Pflueger Assistant Vice-President 

A". M. Smith Assistant Cashier 

E. H. Monroe Assistant Cashier 

J. A. Spears .. Assistant Cashier 

Morse Erskine Trust Officer 

Keyes & Erskine Attorneys 



DIRECTORS 

Wm. H. Crocker Pres. Crocker Nat. Bank 

W. A. Frederick Capitalist 

William Fries, .Pres. Cal. Fruit i 'ariii'-rs' Assn. 

Rudolph Herold, Jr _ Insurance 

Alexander D. Keyes President 

Geo. L. Payne Pres. Payne's Bolt Works 

R. D. Robbins, Jr Baiike*- 

John fi. Sutton Civil Engineer 

P. Zimmerman Capitalist 



Best Equipped and Most MODERN 
GARAGE West of Chicago 

The Century 

Two Blocks from Union Square 

675 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Between Taylor and Jones 



FOB EXCEPTIONAL FOOD AT 
SEASONABLE PRICES 

UNITED SERVICE 
RESTAURANTS 

and BAKERY 

UNIQUE SERVICE 

At Table or Counter 

Attractive Fittings 

Comfortable Surroundings 

NO TIPS 

22-26 CALIFORNIA STREET 

A Block from the Ferry 

TURK AND TAYLOR STREETS 

A Block from Market Street 



Independent Buyers' League 

furnishes its MEMBERS with 
ANYTHING sold at whole- 
sale at wholesale prices. 
Be a Member 

Independent Buyers' League 

833 Market St., Room 902 

Phones Douglas 1203-1204 



Eyes 

Bother 

You? 



Guaranteed 

(^y^O w ° rk a * 

27 7th St. 
DR. J. P. JUHL 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



Have Your 



HAIR PERMANENTLY 
WAVED 



-at — 



COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

360 Geary Street 
San Francisco 

and enjoy your vacation 
Swimming and Fog Improves it 



GUARANTEE 
BATTERY CO. 

Master 
Automobile Electricians 

— and — 




TRADE ^ ^ — ^ MARK 

955-975 POST STREET 
San Francisco, California 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



Jfie ^ 

MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON - 
process. "* 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Quality 1866 — 56 Years—1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

It ii rliiiirt! m.- Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co, 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 




XL 

■ ■ * — 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. 2CXK 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 8, 1922 



No. 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— A railroad strike is bad, but worse would be striking the 
national flag to a labor minority spoiled by special privilege, and 
long prosperity. 

— Many thousand homes may be broken up by the railroad strike 
and never again restored, but that is of small consideration to the 
politicians, who for sefish ends mislead their comrades. 

— Lord Northcliffe has broken down in health, if no other way, 
and is an example of the inability of any single man to dictate or 
force his opinions on all the world, or even a small slice of it. 

— Communist Lenine, after several years of effort to reconstruct 
the world, is raising jackrabbits by the doctors' orders, to give his 
scrambled brains a rest. What a commentary on human ego-mania 

run mad. Hearst should take warning. 

* * * 

— Jewell, leader of the railroad shop crafts, who flouted the Fed- 
eral Wage Board, will not be a "Jewell of great price" after he gets 
through with his fight against the American Government and people. 
For that's what his strike is. 

— Canada announces that in future no barriers will be maintained 
against the transportation of whisky across the border to the United 
States. Canada will not interfere with the rapid and easy payment 

of its national debt by thirsty Americans. 

* * * 

— History repeats itself. The American Federation of Labor and 
Sam Gompers, came into notoriety by destroying the Knights of 
Labor, for not fighting the American Government in a railroad strike. 
Now they go the way of all flesh by fomenting another railroad 

disturbance. 

* * * 

— A most significant feature of the announcement of C. C. 
Moore's candidacy for Senator against Hiram Johnson, is the appear- 
ance of prominent citizens from everywhere in the State, encourag- 
ing the new rival. They seem to fall out of the skies. Hiram has a 

fight on his hands. 

* * * 

— Doctor Barrows denies that any friction with the University 
Regents caused him to resign. The real trouble with our State I ni- 
vorsily is that it is less of an institution of semi-benevolent instruc- 
tion than a Gargantuan political creation, which swallows millions 
like an elephant eating peanuts. 



— "Let his blood be on his own head," said the Federal Wage 
Board chairman, when the strike leader of the railroad shop crafts 
precipitated a walkout. Be certain that if any blood be spilled, it 
will not be the strike leader's. 

V V ¥ 

— Senator Sam Shortridge of California voted favorably in the 
Senate Judiciary Committee for the anti-lynching bill which inflicts 
penalties on counties that burn people at the stake to gratify mob 
vengeance. Our junior Senator from California is always on the 
side of humanity and sterling Republicanism. 

— Andrew Furseth, the Old-Man-of-the-Sea, who has been 
strangling the shipping business in San Francisco for thirty years, 
is going to his native Sweden to attend some kind of an inter- 
national convention. Is there no way of closing the gates on him 
when he's gone, and keeping him out for good? 

— The English labor unions have a well-led membership of eight 
millions in a population of forty, yet they were unable ot put over 
a general strike on their railroads and mines. How can Gompers' 
badly-led labor minority of less than three millions in a population 
of one hundred and ten millions, put over a winning railroad 
strike? 

— The thousands of honest, industrious railroad shopment, faced 
by the grim prospect of losing the good jobs at fair wages, would not 
be driven to such ruinous extremes if the American plan of employ- 
ment ruled America. Competent workmen must be free to accept 
work without permission of a walking delegate who never toils save 
with his jaw. 

— The railroad strike and the miners' massacre, may be the end 
of reckless labor leadership by politicians interested in making 
trouble between capital and labor. The world may as well stop for 
the human race, if Gompers' dictum be accepted, that a workman 
and his employer are mortal enemies, and must wage a merciless 

fight. 

* * * 

— State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Will C. Wood, is 
invoking Volstead enforcers to prevent bootleggers from selling 
schoolboys "hooch." What a farce! Where do schoolboys get the 
money for bootleg worth from $10 to $20 a quart? Mr. Wood is 
the expense official who has saddled ten millions a year additional 

on the taxpayers of the State, by boosting teachers' salaries. 

* * * 

— Frazier. who has beaten Republican Senator McCumber for 
nomination in North Dakota, promises to vote with the farmers' 
"bloc," which is willing to concede anything to any faction, if it 
will only aid the farmer to pocket 99 cents profit on every dollar 
of produce, dodge farm taxes and mortgage laws, and get all the 
loans he wants from the Federal Reserve. That is "progressive 
legislation." 



COMMEKCIAI 



SAFE DEI'OS 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK 



FOUNDED 1869 

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH 

This STATEMENT is so arranged that 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK 

owes Depositors $19,030,433.42 

These deposits represent the 
combined deposits of our Sav- 
ings and Commercial Depart- 
ments, To secure these de- 
posits, our investments are 
so made as to give diversi- 
fied assets. Most of these can 
be quicklv turned into cash. 
Our ASSKTS and INVEST- 
MENTS tire: 
1 — distil on band and in banks.. 1,844,4")2.17 
Gold, currency, silver, checks 
and money oi. hand and on. 
deposit with authorized de- 
positories payable on demand. 

2 — Loans on Real Ewtate (i,!HiO,(i.J3.74 

These consist of First Mort- 
gages on California Real Es- 
tate — in no case exceeding 60 
per cent of the conservative 
value of the property. 

!i — Loans oh Storks and Bonds 1,501,845.61 
Payable generally within six 
months and amply secured by 
high-grade Stocks and Bonds. 

4— Other Loans 1,230,397.01 

Some secured — others for busi- 
ness puri »oses payable gen- 
erally within three months. 
5 — Louns to States, Counties 

and Cities 680,289.01 

In the United States, having 
a small debt and a popula- 
tion of over 20,000. 



JUNE 30, 1922 
SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 

it can be easily understood by everyone. 

6 — United States Liberty and 

Vietory Bonds $ 1,003,157.51 

7 — Bonds of States, Counties 

and Cities 4,010,597.27 

In the United States. 

8 — Other Bonds 2,447,i>.»0.64 

Mostly Public Utilities. Gen- 
erally underlying and easily 
salable. 



-Bank I'remises 



10 — Other Real Estate.. 



1 1 — Armor I'late Sale Deposit 
Vaults 

PrnU'i-trd by electric burglary — 
alarm system and located on 
the ground floor. 

Making Total Assets of *S 

12 — Leaving a difference of e 



t.ooo.ooo.oo 
29,520.64 

98,740.80 



139,210.69 

836,790.48 



which represents — • 

Capital 1 1 

Surplus 

Undivided Profits 

These sums represent the 
Stockholders' guarantee to 
the depositors, and constitute 
the basis on which we build 
and will continue to build a 
sound and complete bank, with 
Savings. Commercial. Trust ■ 
and Safe Deposit Depart- 
ments. 



300,000.00 
550,000.00 

86,7f>o.-;3 



Our BONDS and our BUILDINGS have a greater market value than the amount shown on 
this Statement. This Bank has been in business sinee November 24, 1869. Durinc that time we 
have made many thousands of friends, which faet is one of our most valuable assets. The 
Board of Directors, the Ollieers and Employees are endeavoring to maintain and develop that 
good will by rendering good, eiHeient and courteous service. 



OFFICERS 

Alexander D. Keves President 

Wm. H. Crocker Vice-President 

W. A, Frederick Vice-President 

H. C. Klevesahl Secretary and Cashier 

Paul A. Pflueger Assistant Vice-President 

V. M. Smith Assistant Cashier 

E. H. Monroe Assistant Cashrer 

J. A. Spears _ Assistant Cashier 

Morse Erskine Trust Officer 

Keves & Erskine Attorneys 



DIRECTORS 

Wm. H. Crocker Pies. Crocker Xat. Bank 

W. A. Frederick Capitalist 

William Fries. .l']\-s. (*al. Fruit Canners' Assn. 

Rudolph Herold. Jr _ Insurance 

Alexander D. Keyes President 

Geo. L. Payne Pres. Payne's Bolt Works 

R. D. Robbins. Jr Bauke? 

John Ci. Sutton Civil Engineer 

P. Zimmerman Capitalist 



Best Equipped and Most MODERN 
GARAGE West of Chicago 

The Century 



Two Blocks from Union Square 

675 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Between Taylor and Jones 



FOR EXCEPTIONAL FOOD AT 
REASONABLE PRICES 

UNITED SERVICE 
RESTAURANTS 

and BAKERY 

UXIQUE SERVICE 

At Table or Counter 

Attractive Fittings 

Comfortable Surroundings 

NO TIPS 

22-26 CALIFORNIA STREET 

A RIock from the Ferry 

TURK AND TAYLOR STREETS 

A Block from Market Street 



Independent Buyers' League 

furnishes its MEMBERS with 
ANYTHING sold at whole- 
sale at wholesale prices. 
Be a Member 

Independent Buyers' League 

833 Market St., Room 902 

I'll,,... - Douglas 1203-120,1 



Eyes 

Bother 

You? 



Guaranteed 

<^3»"*(Z) work at 

27 7th St. 
DR. J. P. JTJHL 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
"f experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or mav we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



Have Your 

HAIR PERMANENTLY 
WAVED 



-at- 



COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

360 Geary Street 
San Francisco 

and enjoy your vacation 
Swimming and Fog Improves it 



GUARANTEE 
BATTERY CO. 

Master 
Automobile Electricians 

— and — 




955-975 POST STREET 
San Francisco, California 



CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 




MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Quality 1866-56 Years-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burllngame Redwood City Men In Park 

San Mateo Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 




y iu 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 




fll 



Devoted to the Leading Interests o£ California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. 2Da-- 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 8, 1922 



No 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif.. Post onice as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— A railroad strike is bad, but worse would be striking the 
national flag to a labor minority spoiled by special privilege, and 
long prosperity. 

— Many thousand homes may be broken up by the railroad strike 
and never again restored, but that is of small consideration to the 
politicians, who for sefish ends mislead their comrades. 

— Lord Northcliffe has broken down in health, if no other way, 
and is an example of the inability of any single man to dictate or 
force his opinions on all the world, or even a small slice of it. 

■ — Communist Lenine, after several years of effort to reconstruct 
the world, is raising jackrabbits by the doctors' orders, to give his 
scrambled brains a rest. What a commentary on human ego-mania 
run mad. Hearst should take warning. 

* * * 

— Jewell, leader of the railroad shop crafts, who flouted the Fed- 
eral Wage Board, will not be a "Jewell of great price" after he gets 
through with his fight against the American Government and people. 
For that's what his strike is. 

— Canada announces that in future no barriers will be maintained 
against the transportation of whisky across the border to the United 
States. Canada will not interfere with the rapid and easy payment 
of its national debt by thirsty Americans. 

— History repeats itself. The American Federation of Labor and 
Sam Gompers, came into notoriety by destroying the Knights of 
Labor, for not fighting the American Government in a railroad strike. 
Now they go the way of all flesh by fomenting another railroad 

disturbance. 

* * * 

— A most significant feature of the announcement of C. C. 
Moore's candidacy for Senator against Hiram Johnson, is the appear- 
ance of prominent citizens from everywhere in the State, encourag- 
ing the new rival. They seem to fall out of the skies. Hiram has a 

fight on his hands. 

* * * 

■ — Doctor Barrows denies that any friction with the University 
Regents caused him to resign. The real trouble with our State Uni- 
versity is that it is less of an institution of semi-benevolent instruc- 
tion than a Gargantuan political creation, which swallows millions 
like an elephant eating peanuts. 



— "Let his blood be on his own head," said the Federal Wage 
Board chairman, when the strike leader of the railroad shop crafts 
precipitated a walkout. Be certain that if any blood be spilled, it 
will not be the strike leader's. 

— Senator Sam Shortridge of California voted favorably in the 
Senate Judiciary Committee for the anti-Iynching bill which inflicts 
penalties on counties that burn people at the stake to gratify mob 
vengeance. Our junior Senator from California is always on the 
side of humanity and sterling Republicanism. 

— Andrew Furseth, the Old-Man-of-the-Sea, who has been 
strangling the shipping business in San Francisco for thirty years, 
is going to his native Sweden to attend some kind of an inter- 
national convention. Is there no way of closing the gates on him 

when he's gone, and keeping him out for good? 
v V" •/• 

— The English labor unions have a well-led membership of eight 
millions in a population of forty, yet they were unable ot put over 
a general strike on their railroads and mines. How can Gompers' 
badly-led labor minority of less than three millions in a population 
of one hundred and ten millions, put over a winning railroad 

strike? 

* * * 

— The thousands of honest, industrious railroad shopment, faced 
by the grim prospect of losing the good jobs at fair wages, would not 
be driven to such ruinous extremes if the American plan of employ- 
ment ruled America. Competent workmen must be free to accept 
work without permission of a walking delegate who never toils save 

with his jaw. 

* * * 

— The railroad strike and the miners' massacre, may be the end 
of reckless labor leadership by politicians interested in making 
trouble between capital and labor. The world may as well stop for 
the human race, if Gompers' dictum be accepted, that a workman 
and his employer are mortal enemies, and must wage a merciless 

fight. 

* * * 

— State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Will C. Wood, is 
invoking Volstead enforcers to prevent bootleggers from selling 
schoolboys "hooch." What a farce! Where do schoolboys get the 
money for bootleg worth from $10 to $20 a quart? Mr. Wood is 
the expense official who has saddled ten millions a year additional 
on the taxpayers of the State, by boosting teachers' salaries. 

* * * 

— Frazier. who has beaten Republican Senator McCumber for 
nomination in North Dakota, promises to vote with the farmers' 
"bloc," which is willing to concede anything to any faction, if it 
will only aid the farmer to pocket 99 cents profit on every dollar 
of produce, dodge farm taxes and mortgage laws, and get all the 
loans he wants from the Federal Reserve. That is "progressive 
legislation." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 8, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




Our newspapers in San 
Parlor Bolshevism in United States Senate Francisco always try to 

sprinkle malodorous la- 
bor affairs with rosewater. The truth of what United States Senator 
Myers of Montana said about the cowardly and inhuman massacre 
of non-union miners in Illinois, was only half told. Neither was the 
fact plainly brought out, for the information of the newspaper read- 
ers, that Senator Borah, who is one of. the Senatorial obstruction- 
ists of President Harding's policies, endeavored to cloud the issue. 
He wished to have the Senate know clearly were the men victims 
of the massacre, men who lived in the vicinity, as if that had any 
legal relation to a citizen's right to live, or be killed like a rat in his 
own country — a nation nominally free and law-abiding. 

Borah, like all parlor Bolshevists, wanted to go beyond the in- 
human massacre before condemning the ruthless murderers. The 
"standing evil" which had brought about the savage butchery 
"should be first cured." While Borah and his congenial politico- 
scientific diagnosticians are examining the "standing evil" under 
their microscopes, red-handed murderers can go on and massacre 
another bunch of non-union miners. 

Senator Myers, replying to the "conscientious objector" to punish- 
ing murderers, on general principles, said: "It was to be presumed 
that the non-union miners massacred had been acting in good faith. 
That, he said is a presumption. The law presumes that every man 
acts in good faith. If those non-union miners who were massacred 
went there for peaceful purposes, for lawful purposes, and were un- 
armed; if they went there to make a living, I can see no evidence of 
bad faith in their going there. A man has a right to earn a living 
in this country. He has a right to go wherever he can find work. 
Two of those men were ex-service men. Two of them were college 
graduates. One of them was the son of the mayor of an American 
city. They were not all imported from Chicago. Some of them, it 
appears, lived in that part of the State." 

Borah agreed with Senator Myers that men should be "pro- 
tected in their rights." Even if the massacred men went there at the 
suggestion of detectives as strike breakers they should have been 
protected against unlawful assaults, he admitted, "but the men who 
brought them there — the operators — must have known from experi- 
ences of the past that that kind of thing inevitably brings on just 
such affairs as happened." 

When a Senator of the United States, spoken of as a "Presiden- 
tial possibility," argues in that style, the property-owning and em- 
ploying classes are in a perilous condition. 

Senator Myers, replying to Borah, declared he could see "nothing 
unconstitutional in the employment of the non-union miners who 
were massacred — nothing contrary to the privileges of an American 
citizen. It is the right of union coal miners in this country to quit 
work if they wish. On the other hand, it is the right, yea, not only 
the right but the duty, of the owners of the coal mines, if they can 
do so, to get other men to take the places of those quitting, and to 
keep the mines running, if they can get men with whom they can 
agree as to terms and conditions of labor and wages. 

"It is the duty of the mine owners, if they car do so, to keep the 
mines running with other employees, because coal is a public neces- 
sity, and the mine owners owe a duty to the public to supply the 
public with a public necessity in order to keep the public from freez- 
ing and starving to death. 

"I assert that the employers were within their rights and were 
performing their duty to the public, and that the men who went 
there to work were within their rights as American citizens, or if not 
all citizens, as residents of the United States and of the State of 
Illinois. These men were cruelly killed, brutally murdered, for exer- 



cising their simple rights as citizens or residents. Is there any free 
America about that? No. 

"So I say there is no free America, and there never will be any so 
long as an American citizen does not have the free and untrammeled 
right to work when and where and for whom and upon such terms 
and at such wages as he may please, without asking leave of any 
invisible power, any self-constituted superior power, any organized 
minority, or any organization. 

"That condition, however, strange as it may seem, doas not exist 
in the United States today. Today an honest workman who does 
not belong to a labor union is not altogether at liberty to go and 
hunt work and obtain peaceful, lawful employment at an honest oc- 
cupation and earn an honest living without getting the consent of 
a self-constituted superior power, of an invisible government, of an 
organized minority, which has decreed that no man in the United 
States has an inherent right to work unharmed at a peaceful occupa- 
tion without 'our consent.' That is the condition in the United 
States today to a large extent, at least in many parts of the country, 
and so long as that condition exists we have no right to boast of 
vaunted free America, the land of liberty, because the freedom is not 
here. Liberty is not here. When such awful things as the horrible 
crime of which I have been talking can happen it is not free Amer- 
ica. These men who were so brutally killed did not enjoy the benefits 
of free America. They were deprived of their lives, when pursuing 
their rights, by lawless acts that defy free America and make a farce 
of it. 

"Those lawless acts were the result of the dominance of an organ- 
ized minority, and I say that the domination of an organized minority 
is the greatest menace that confronts the American people today." 



The California State Irrigation Association, 
Do Not Be Stampeded in a circular issued by the executive com- 
mittee, states that the people of the State 
should await the official report on the State's water resources and 
"not be stampeded into supporting the so-called 'Water and Power 
Act,' or any other movement that advocates the expenditure of five 
hundred million dollars, without complete investigation and report 
by the Department of Public Works of California." 

The last State Legislature authorized the appointment by the Gov- 
ernor of a consulting committee of ten members to serve .in an 
advisory capacity to the Department of Public Works in making in- 
vestigations of the water resources of California and compiling in- 
formation for a report to the next Legislature, for which was ap- 
propriated the sum of $200,000. The Governor appointed what is 
considered to be a well-balanced committee representing all sections 
of the State. What is needed is a uniform and co-ordinated develop- 
ment of the State's water resources for the benefit of all. 



Two months ago, the 
Effects of Dishonest Volstead Enforcement New York Hotel Men's 

Association complained 
that the Volstead law had reduced hotel business fifty per cent. Now 
it is announced that the Hotel Claridge, Broadway and Forty-fourth 
Street, a pretentious thirteen-story establishment, is to be converted 
at once into an office building. The conversion of the Hotel Claridge 
follows the sale of the Knickerbocker Hotel and its transformation 
to an office building. 

The Hotel Claridge management makes no secret that Volstead 
enforcement has compelled its transformation — unequal enforce- 
ment. Because the prohibition officers held the Hotel Claridge to the 
strict letter of the law while other establishments in the neighbor- 
hood could supply liquor to their customers, the pretentious hotel 



July 8, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



was forced to close its doors. Thus prohibition not only converts an 
open liquor trade into an illicit traffic for the benefit of bootleggers, 
but puts a premium on graft and lawlessness by driving honest hotel 
proprietors out of business. 

The Hotel Claridge depended largely for its revenue upon two fine 
restaurants, but these could not compete with nearby places where 
liquor could be bought, nor could the restaurants expect patronage 
enough to be profitable, from a small number of guests willing to 
pay high prices for excellence in food and service. 

The Hotel Claridge was built by Charles E. Rector in 1912, and 
was known as "Rector's." It became one of the principal places in 
the theatre district. Forty-fourth Street, on which the Hotel Claridge 
has its main entrance, has twenty-one restaurants including a number 
of coffee houses and tea rooms. 

Last month the New York Hotel Men's Association complained to 
President Harding and Secretary of the Treasury Mellon of the injury 
done reputable houses by unfair Volstead enforcement, but the mag- 
nitude of the task of providing fair enforcement is beyond the power 
of our Government. The worst thing that ever happened the United 
States is the enthronement of a principle of fanaticism in the United 
States. The sooner we moderate the Volstead blue law, as Canada 
has done, and make distribution of liquor a government function, 
and the sale of wine and beer a lawful transaction, the better for 
everybody — even for the foolish fanatics who oppose it and are 
destroying the prosperity and the moral fibre of the nation. 



The decision of maintenance-of-way 
Obey the Lawful Government union not to join in a railroad strike 

"until they are convinced that there 
is no hope of a peaceful settlement" indicates that there is some 
faint glimmer of intelligent comprehension of their duties and re- 
sponsibilities in the minds of the railroad workers. It may gradu- 
ally dawn on them all that their strike would be an insurrection 
against the lawful Government of the United States. Undoubtedly 
the Government would put down a strike of some half a million 
railroad workers. It put down an insurrection of the Southern States 
with many million seceders. 

In the back of the heads of these labor leaders inciting strike, 
is the thought that they can win by force. And they might win 
against the railroads. But certainly not against the whole American 
people whom they intend to injure. The aroused American people 
are a mighty force. When organized labor refuses to obey the 
governmental body, which it was instrumental in creating by act 
of Congress, the American people are sure to demand a firm atti- 
tude against those responsible for the unjustified disturbance of 
the peace and prosperity of the nation. 

The unions that prefer to deliberate on the prospects of satisfac- 
tory arbitration and public peace act wisely. It is to be hoped 
their preference for what is lawful and right will grow into a firm 
resolution to show themselves worthy Americans by obeying the 
laws of their land. 



Not alone the great commercial 
The Whole Pacific Coast Alarmed organizations of the Pacific Coast, 

like our San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce, but shippers in every small community have joined 
in the preparation of facts to avert the threatened separation of 
the Southern Pacific and Central Pacific railroad system. The all im- 
portant matter will be considered by the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission in October. 

The public is interested in the best railway service with the greatest 
convenience to them. The business fact is that the Central Pacific 
as a name has dropped out of the talk of the shipping and traveling 
public for many decades. It has been operated as a part of the rail- 
road system of the Southern Pacific, and the whole operation has 



been a unit built up to suit and serve the people of the Pacific 
Coast along its lines. By general consent it is well fitted to perform 
that service. 

Every device suggested for tearing asunder this satisfactory rail- 
road system is little more than an impractical makeshift. After it 
was all done the public would have no better service than before, 
and would have to deal with two lines instead of one. New oper- 
ating organizations would have to be created. The public would 
derive no benefit from the expenditures involved. The separation 
of the lines would be an enormous disarrangement of operation. 
What can the public gain by such a change? Everywhere from Port- 
land to San Francisco, from San Francisco to Los Angeles, Los 
Angeles to Yuma and beyond, the public would be injured by the 
dislocation of arrangements. 

Understanding that fact and fearful of its being attempted, the 
public of the whole Pacific Coast will join in the effort to demon- 
strate to the Interstate Commerce Commission that the separation 
of the Southern Pacific and the Central Pacific would only be an 
enormous injury, instead of a public benefit. 



Some of the Supervisors are revising their 
City Cannot Stand Still figures on estimates of what the city should 
pay the Market Street Railway Com- 
pany for its properties, in the proposition to buy the private lines 
out of their earnings, and unify them with the municipal system. 

It is to be hoped that no Supervisor will endeavor to make small 
politics out of the important proposition. The prosperity of the city 
is not to be endangered by plans to gain votes for public office. 
Of course the people want to buy the private lines as cheap as pos- 
sible, with due regard to the fact that in such transactions a city 
is not expected to play the part of Shylock demanding his pound of 
flesh. The courts of law have long since laid down the rule that 
the public, when the buyer, is supposed to be fair and liberal in- 
stead of the reverse. 

The lines of the Market Street Railway Company have great 
value as part of a unified system of street transportation. They are 
vital to such unification and if the city decides by vote to acquire 
them, it must act with perfect fairness in the purchase. 

The demand for extensions in the direction of San Mateo and in 
Sunset, which has stood still while Richmond has progressed enor- 
mously, removes all question of the need of unification of the pri- 
vate and municipal lines. They cannot prosper as rivals, for the 
private lines are prevented by charter restrictions from undertak- 
ing expensive extensions, and to extend the municipal lines without 
taking into account the existence of private lines already built would 
lead to unnecessary paralleling and unwise expenditures of large 
sums to be paid by the property owners. 

Sound business considerations and civic interest in the rapid 
growth of our city on a proper plan of development, point to the 
purchase of the private lines as soon as possible. Cities, no more 
than individuals, can afford to stand still. They either advance or 
retrograde. As far as the growth of Sunset as a great district of 
homes is concerned, and as regards the natural growth of popula- 
tion toward San Mateo, we are distinctly retrograding. We should 
stop it by going ahead on the proposition to unify our lines of 
street cars. If the Supervisors will address their efforts to the pro- 
ject as one of vital business interest and forget politics for the time 
being, the proposition can be made an accomplished fact of great 
value to the community. 



— Seeing what an improvement a sane Fourth of July is as com- 
pared with the midsummer day madness of our grandfathers, in the 
days of good old Fire Chief Scannell, we should lose no time in 
making Sanity our slogan — Sanity in patriotism and Sanity in the 
enforcement of law and justice. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 8, 1922 



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ii 'LyilililiyS) 

Figures of Municipal Expenses Not Made to Enlighten but to Mystify 



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BY MONTGOMERY SMITH 



A DISSATISFIED and discouraged citizen, making a protest to 
the Board of Supervisors the other day, was heckled in the 
style which has become the fashion under the present machine form 
of municipal government. "Please point out any one department 
where you think expenses can be reduced," the citizen complaining 
of high taxes was loftily told. What nerve Supervisors must have to 
speak like that to a citizen and taxpayer, of whom they are the 
elected servants — not the masters. In the term of James Rolph, Jr., 
as Mayor of San Francisco, the annual cost of running the city has 
increased from nine millions to twenty-five millions, yet a citizen 
complaining of high taxes, is heckled and brow-beaten for suggest- 
ing that any item in the annual budget could be reduced. Nine mil- 
lions to twenty-five millions is practically an increase of three hun- 
dred per cent. Our population has not increased seventy-five per 
cent. And the worst is yet to come! Early in April, the newspapers 
reported Supervisor McLaren as stating in a public address, that a 
way to reduce taxation had presented itself. Wonderful discovery! 
"Bond interest and redemption requirements," declared the municipal 
statesman, "had passed the peak, and would thereafter automa- 
tically decrease." On the contrary, bond interest and redemption 
have not yet reached the peak and will continue to increase, unless 
some revenue is received from our municipal exploit in the produc- 
tion of electric power. We know in advance how much money is 
going to be put in the public treasury, by any utility in which the 
municipality is proprietor. The tax-payers may as well face the 
fact that no reduction of city expenses can take place under the 
administration of Mayor Rolph. They must take steps to change it. 
The annual increase of cost from nine millions to twenty-five is 
enough. Let us not wait for the confiscation of all houses and lots, 
but change our city government at the next election. There are 
eighty thousand lot owners in San Francisco, but they are politi- 
cally as feeble and defenseless as a dozen Chinese laundrymen. 
Mayor Sets the Example of Extravagance 

When the dissatisfied taxpayer, appearing before the Board of 
Supervisors, was asked to put his figure on one item of extravagance, 
he should have replied that the waste was so enormous it would be 
useless to individualize. Besides, it does not do for taxpayers to be 
fresh in their complaints to our Supervisors, unless they can pre- 
face their freshness with the announcement that they speak for some 
union, with a host of mythical members. If one could say, "Gentle- 
men, I appear as the walking delegate of the Telegraph Hill Local 
999, of the Scavengers Protective and Benevolent Association of a 
million members, here and on their way from Italy, he could be 
sure of studied courtesy. But to say merely, "I am an American 
citizen and a taxpayer," would be taking desperate chances. Such 
is the puerility of unorganized citizens. We live in an age of tyranny 
by organized minorities. Three or four thousand organized tax- 
eaters in our City Hall, headed by a complaisant Mayor, have run 
up our taxes over three hundred per cent, and increased the annual 
cost of the municipal government from nine millions to twenty-five 
million members, here and on their way from Italy," he could be 
are openly and defiantly flouted, yet no one has the culprits ar- 
raigned and sued in court. Some of them are liable on large bonds. 
Taxpayers expect no better than the rough treatment they receive 
when they lack the civic pride and the courage to take matters in 
their own hands. 

By our Charter, made by the inspiration of rich ex-Senator Phelan, 



who was ambitious of making the Mayoralty of San Francisco a 
stepping-stone to high office, the Mayor was given autocratic pow- 
ers. He is practically an over-lord. If wise and honest, our city 
government will be good. But if unwise and tricky, our municipality 
will suffer. Our present Mayor's fault is that he has shown himself 
a manager whose expensiveness we cannot afford. His honesty is not 
questioned, but people cannot build their own homes or afford to 
live in them, under the taxes that have been enforced under his 
administration. No doubt, he is not entirely to blame for the high 
taxes, but he is the head of the city government, and responsible to 
the taxpayers who are numerous enough to seat, or unseat, any 
Mayor. Can we not find a wiser and more economical Mayor of 
San Francisco? If our taxpayers and our newspapers cannot elect 
a man, who shall make our city a place to build a home and leave 
it to one's children, without a load of municipal debt, shared by 
everybody, then God help San Francisco. 

Figures Intended to Deceive 

When the complaining taxpayer at the Supervisors' meeting was 
asked to name a department where expenses could be reduced, the 
Mayor and Supervisors knew that none but an expert, and even then 
an expert on the inside, could tell anything about the budget of the 
municipality. There has been a systematic effort to cover up ex- 
penses. As the Bureau of Governmental Research has pointed out 




nipreme 

intaste flavor & aroma 

©well's 

^^NATIONAI CREST 

(offee 

1,800.000 cupj were .served 
at tie PANAMA.- PACIFIC 
Ivteenaiional EXPOSITION- 



Telephones 
Sutter G(f54 — Oakland 1017 



July 8. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



in its January summary, non-personal service failed to be segregated, 
and the bad practice of appropriating lump sums for the various 
departments is continued. "Lump-sum allowances are absolutely un- 
intelligible to citizens," declares the Bureau of Governmental Re- 
search. Of course they are. The Bureau probably knows that they 
have been made purposely unintelligible. 

Under the fake pretense of printing being expensive, the annual 
report of the Supervisors has ceased to be of any value as a record. 
The late John Russell, Clerk of the Board of Supervisors, a man of 
fine executive ability and great industry, made the Supervisors' an- 
nual report a veritable history where one might find valuable facts, 
set forth with system and accuracy. Since the efficient Chief Clerk 
died, some years ago, the annual report of the Supervisors has 
become practically useless. Veritable laziness seems the chief char- 
acteristic of the compilers. Comparisons of late annual reports of 
the Supervisors, with any of those compiled by Clerk Russell, is 
calculated to make a taxpayer sad. Yet the present Chief Clerk of 
the Board gets a much larger salary than his famous predecessor, 
and has at least six times as many clerks. There is one for every 
committee. The present Chief Clerk put in most of his time, during 
the war, acting as special envoy at Washington, arranging for navy 
bases, and drydocks, and Hetch Hetchy grants, all matters belong- 
ing to our Congressional representatives in Washington. Large sums 
were paid to the Chief Clerk of the Supervisors, for those prolonged 
jaunts to the centre of national government, and his expenses were 
furnished and appropriations drawn from the public treasury. In 
fact, his official activities were similar to the plenipotentiary of a 
sovereign prince of the Middle Ages in Europe. During Chief Clerk 
Dunnigan's diplomatic peregrinations, of course the recording of the 
acts of the Supervisors for the annual report became a lost art. It 
has never been revived and the example of negligence and sloth is 
copied in various branches of the municipal service. The annual 
budget is made to mystify and bamboozle the taxpayers, not to en- 
lighten them. 

Our municipal corporation instead of being a business arrange- 
ment, with the citizens paying for the protection of life and prop- 
erty, is a political machine, directed by an elected potentate who 
dispenses favors like an Oriental conqueror to his followers. From 
a business standpoint it. is perfectly asinine. The community must 
be verging towards chronic softening of the brain to permit it for 
one month. 



BREAKDOWN OF THE IRISH GOVERNMENTS 

"The talk on both sides about the necessity for provocative prep- 
arations, in order to repel invasion by the other, is not merely rub- 
bish; it is known to be rubbish by every intelligent European or 
American who reads a reputable newspaper." 

Such is the comment of the Winchester Guardian. It adds: "The 
enormous majority of plain Irish men and women on both sides of 
the border want nothing more than to get on quietly with their work 
— the one supreme service that at this moment any Irishman can do 
to Ireland. The whole world knows, and cannot be kept from know- 
ing, what the real trouble is. Each of the Irish governments has 
got on its premises a vicious gang whom it cannot keep from mur- 
der and arson. So far both governments have broken down. The 
actual breakdown, the failure of the Craig Ministry to protect Cath- 
olics from wholesale murder in Belfast and the failure of the Collins 
Ministry to prevent raiding and arson on the Ulster border are as 
gross and palpable as a pair of mountains. The only honest and 
really patriotic policy for either is to get its own house into order. 
The temptation is to slur over the offenses of its own least worthy 
citizens or followers, to ignore the existence of a decent and well- 
intentioned majority on the other side, and to lump the whole of 
the other side loosely together as "the enemy" and as accomplices 
in the guilt of its criminals. That is true demagogy, the basest 
burlesque of democracy, the telling of maddening falsehoods and 
half-truths to the people, and the betrayal of the people into the 
miseries that must come of the madness thus engineered." 



-* ♦ * ♦ * ♦ ♦ * •!• * ♦ ♦ * •> * •!• *> * * * ♦ * ♦ ♦ * * * * •:• * * * * * * # * * •;• •> •> * * *> •:• # 

! Casa Del Rev l 



* SANTA CRUZ 



CALIFORNIA 



The ^Million "Dollar Fireproof Hotel 



THE ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm 
beach bathing; dancing; good music; artistic, home-like 
spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful 
playgrounds; sanitary warm bathing pool; swimming 
instructors; saddle ponies for children. Special kitchen- 
ette in hotel proper where maid can prepare food for 
young children. 

Complete highways, through the most beautiful sec- 
tion of California. (Qnly 80 miles.) The Southern Pa- 
cific offers unusually low rates from all California points; 
the warmest and most accessible beach out of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also 
under the same management as Casa Del Rey. 

Correspondence about rates for families with maids 
and children solicited. Special rates by the week or for 
extended stays of a month or two. Address: 



•:• 
•:■ 
* 

* 
* 
* 



CASA DEL REY : 

MORRIS & WARNER, 



SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 
Proprietors. Phone 000 






* 



* 
* 
* 

* 
* 

f 

* 



* 
* 

* 



* 
* 
* 

* 

•;• 



— Chief Justice Shaw, and Justices Wilbur Sloane and Waste of 
the Supreme Court, having denied Miss Charlotte Anita Whitney a 
rehearing of appeal from conviction of syndicalism in Alameda 
County, the yellow newspapers are yelping. We must uphold our 
Supreme Court and discourage attacks on it, or the Bolshevists will 
overrun the State — parlor and back alley Bolshevists alike. 




FEATHER RIVER INN 

Bl .A1KS1IKV PI \ M \^ » 01 NTY 

rnlifnrnia'* Ideal Mountain Ko-nrt 

Ylnr Orrh«--tra — I'un.inc BlMJ Kveninr 

NOW OPEN 

Thp I 

- 
minp. 

Fit iress 

« . H. ItKOHN, IVmhrr Riwr Inn, KUlrodrn. Plum*** < tuinly, ( al. 
















SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 8, 1922 




'OnelbtlwUfhf tic dcrHsir. Kli/m 

— We have had a sane Fourth of July in San Francisco. Why 
cannot we have every day, every week, every year characterized 
by sanity rather than madness? 

* * * 

— Government statisticians announce that in some large cities — 
New York in particular — the per centage of insanity is increasing 
four times faster than population. That tends to verify the scien- 
tific prophecy that unless civilized mankind — so-called — takes a 
wiser course his race will wind up in the mad house. 

— Any kind of public madness seizes us without our realizing, 
at the moment, that we are the victims of mental aberration. That 
is characteristic of nearly all diseases. They steal on us, whether 
mental, moral or physical. Now when we have seen a sane Fourth 
of July we realize what raving lunatics we were to tolerate the in- 
sane July celebrations of olden days. Were not our grandfathers 
the wildest of madmen in their dangerous demonstrations of patrio- 
tism on the national holiday? 

* * * 

— In granddad's day the Glorious Fourth was approached as if 
the fate of the Nation de- 
pended on burning up the 
city. Countless tons of fire- 
works were burned, regard- 
less of the effects on prop- 
erty and the inevitable stimu- 
lation of business at the hos- 
pitals and the morgues. 
* * * 

— As a native son, one of 
my vivid infantile recollec- 
tions is of old David Scannell, 
the San Francisco fire chief, 
storming around his head- 
quarters on Bush street, above 
Kearny, on the Fourth of 
July, like a hard-pressed gen- 
eral trying to resist attacks 
from a hundred points. And 
in truth such was his condi- 
tion. On every thoroughfare 
and in every back alley in 
San Francisco the popula- 
tion was endeavoring, with all 
its reckless energies, to reduce 
the city to ashes. The air was 
filled with the detonations of 
infernal contrivances to scare 
timid old women to death, 
and set the wooden sidewalks 
aflame. 

— Not alone was every boy 
on the street equipped with a 
punk and a pocketfull of 
bombs, capable of overturning 
a street car, but every wo- 
man in the windows overlook- 
ing the merry scene was con- 
tributing to the explosions and 



clouds of pungent smoke. A pleasant prank was to tie a bunch of 
fire crackers to a Chinaman's pig tail, and kick the poor coolie if 
he had the poor taste to resent the delicate pleasantry. The fire 
bell rang steadily. The frantic and exhausted fire force dashed 
every way its small numbers would permit. The newspapers reck- 
oned up the fires by the hundreds and the insurance companies next 
day sat down to see how much the rate for the coming Fourth 
should be raised to bring them out any where near even. 



— That was a pioneer Fourth of July in San Francisco and in 
most respects resembled what was going on all over the land. No- 
body seemed to realize that exuberant patriotism needs not neces- 
sarily be childish hysteria. And for fifty years the Fourth of July 
madness has gone on in spite of all attempts to restrain its danger- 
ous and expensive demonstrations. Advocates of sanity in patrio- 
tism as well as in all things, have been met by the argument that 
idealism was worth far more than money. Young America should 
not be allowed to forget the glorious deeds of the founders of the 
Republic by locking up his fireworks on the national holiday. How 
Young America could be made a better citizen by teaching him 
to be a dangerous nusiance on the Fourth of July has never been 
satisfactorily explained by advocates of explosive patriotism. Chinese 
from whom we learned to demonstrate patriotic fervor by noise, has 
been exploding fireworks almost since the days of Confuscius to keep 
out foreign devils and keep down native ones; but has been an 
eminent failure in both respects. 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 



One Hundred and Ninth Half Yearly Report 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 



(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



COMMERCIAL 



JUNE 30th, 1922 
ASSETS— 

United States Bonds and Notes, State, Municipal and Other 

Bonds (total value $24,823, 199.00) standing on books at $23,218,198.68 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first mortgages 43,979,542.60 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities 1,058,702.69 

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 106,500.00 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices 

(cost over $1,052,000.00), standing on books at 1 .00 

Other Real Estate (value $116,000.00), standing on books at 1.00 

Employees' Pension Fund (value $385,984.61) standing on 

books at 1 .00 

Cash on hand and in Federal Reserve Bank 7,807,230.21 



Total $76,170,177.18 

LIABILITIES— 

Due Depositors $72,470,177.18 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,700,000.00 

Total $76,170,177.18 

GEO. TOURNY, Vice-President and Manager A. H. MULLER, Secretary 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 30th day of JUNE, 1922. 

[SEAL] CHAS.'F. DU1SENBERG, Notary Public. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT 

GEO. TOURNY I, N. WALTER 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW 

WALTER A. HAAS 



E. N. VAN BERGEN 
ROBERT DOLLAR 
L. S. SHERMAN 
C. W. DOANE 



GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE 4 ORRICK, 
General Attorneys 



Deposits made on or before July 10th, 1922, will earn interest from July 1st, 1922. 

A Dividend to Depositors of four and one-quarter (4V4) per cent per 
annum was declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1922. 



July 8, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



OLD MEN AND JOURNALISM 

Referring to the ninety-first birthday celebration of William Stob- 
bing of the London Times, the New York World contradicts the 
common notion that newspaper-making is a young man's job. 

"American journalism is familiar with such instances as John 
Bigelow, who continued at 90 his yearly journeys to Paris, and Wil- 
liam Cullen Bryant, who died in the harness and in full vigor at 84. 
More recently Colonel Watterson and Colonel Hester of Brooklyn 
have shown the same octogenarian activity. Melville E. Stone at 
73 and Chester S. Lord at 72 are giving sage counsel for younger 
journalists. J. C. Hemphill, 72; Charles R. Miller, editor of the New 
York Times, 73; Edward P. Mitchell, editor of the Herald, 70; 
Charles Hopkins Clark, editor of the Hartford Courant, 74, arei 
examples that would readily occur of journalists active in a ripe age. 

"The World recently printed a booklet descriptive of a few of its 
writers and artists. Their age as given or indicated averaged 47 
years. Four are under 30, 12 between 30 and 40, 36 between 40 
and 50, 14 between 50 and 60, six between 60 and 70 — and no 
doubt others whose age is not given — while of the three past 70, one 
is 76 and one 79, and both are daily at work in the World office. 

"The theory that journalism is essentially a young man's occu- 
pation is not sustained by the evidence. Newspaper writers live ap- 
parently steady lives and as long as other professional men; white 
hair does not of itself drive them out." 



BANK OF ITALY WINS THREE SILVER CUPS 

Telegraphic advice has been received here by W. W. Douglas, vice 
president of the Bank of Italy, announcing the judge's decision at 
the annual meeting of the Pacific Coast Advertising Clubs at San 
Diego. 

Three silver cups — one for the best display of bank advertising, 
the second for the best bond advertising exhibit, and the third for 
the best general advertising display of the entire convention — were 
won by the Bank of Italy. 

♦ •;* * ♦ ♦ * * *> *!• *** •*» ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ * *> ♦ ♦ •> *♦• * * * # * •i* * •i* * ♦ * * * * * t * * * * * 



HOO 
DYE 

(houdaille) 

HYDRAULIC 
SHOCK ABSORBERS 

H. D. SCHRODER & CO., Inc. 



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Distributors 



Telephone Franklin 698 



1616 Bush St. 



After being displayed in San Diego and Los Angeles, the cups 
were sent here and are now on public exhibition at the Bank of 
Italy. 






THE 



CROCKER NATIONAL BANK 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 



CONDITION AT Till! CLOSK OF BUSINESS JUNE 30. 1022 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts $24,367,48 1 .93 

U. S. Bonds and Certificates 7,836,467.89 

Other Bonds and Securities 723J185I25 

Capital Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of San 

Francisco 160,000.00 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit 1.078.584.50 

Cash and Sight Exchange 9,172,632.69 

$44,217,352.26 
LIABILITIES 

Capital $ 2,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 6,559,382.36 

Circulation 1.070, 300.00 

Letters of Credit 2,106,494.22 

Deposits 31,581,175,68 

$44,217,352.26 



OFFICERS 

WM, H. CROCKER, President 



Jas. J. Fagan.Vice-Pres. 
W. Gregg. Vice-Pres. 
J. B. McCargar, Vice-Pres. 
Wm. W. Crocker, Vice-Pres. 

F. G. Willis. Cashier 

G. W. Ebner, Asst. Cashier 
B. D. Dean, Asst. Cashier 



J. M. Masten, Asst. Cashier 

D. J. Murphy, Asst. Cashier 

A. C. Read, Asst. Cashier 

W. D. Lux. Asst. Cashier 

J. A. Rounds. Asst. Cashier 

I I < \ Simpson, Mgr. Frgn. Dept. 

H. H. Haight.Asst. Mgr. Fn. Dept. 



G. Feris Baldwin, Auditor 

1:0 Mill OF DIRECTORS 

Wm. H. Crocker George W. Scott W. Gregg 

Charles T. Crocker R. S. Moore S. F. B Morse 

Jas. J. Fagan Chas. E. Green J. B. McCargar 

A. G. Griffin William W. Crocker 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 

THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 

OK SAX FRANCISCO 

AT THE CLOSE OK BUSINESS, JUNE 30, IB2U 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts 

U. S. atlon 

other r. s. Bonds and Certificate* 

Other it is and Securities 

Other 

Customer's Liability on Letters of Credit and 

Acceptances 10,31 

idlty Drafts in Transit I 1,021 

1 'ash and Sight Exchange 



77V1S 



LIABILITIES 

Capital St 

Surplus and Undivided Profit! 

Circulation 

•ounts with Federal Reserve Hank 
Letters of Credit. Domestic and Foreign 

Other 1. Nihilities 



OFnt 1 ti- 



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HERBERT KLblSHHACKER. President 



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K R Alexander, . 

A. Van Smith 
Eugene Plunkett. 
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John 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER July 8 

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1922 



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Compared With Our Own Earth by Studies From Airplane 

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BY VINCENT L. STRONG 



SCORES of theories about Mars are being put to the test again 
ay telescopes, especially in Southern observatories, as the planet 
was only 41,000,000 miles away on June 18, the closest since 1909. 
Next year Mars will reach its closest opposition — when only 35,000,- 
000 miles will separate us. At their greatest distance apart the 
planets are separated by almost 250,000,000 miles. 

Mars will be studied, on its close approach to the earth this year 
and next, by more astronomers than those who worked on it in 1909. 
and by men better equipped for the special study, although scien- 
tists generally believe that nothing will be settled concerning this 
old puzzle. 

The theories about Mars run from that of the late Perciva! Lowell, 
who saw it covered with geometrical patterns which he believed to 
have been produced by engineers, to that of Dr. William H. Picker- 
ing of Harvard, who believes that life exists on Mars, but that the 
so-called canals are natural valleys, and then on to the theory of Dr. 
Arhennius that the planet is frozen and lifeless and that the canals 
probably are in the nature of earthquake fissures. The astronomers 
who believe there is sound evidence of life on the planet are in a 
small minority. 

Dr. Pickering has worked out a set of instructions, especially for 
the benefit of amateur astronomers, showing them how to mark the 1 
lines aand fill in the colored spots on Mars. From a multitude of 
sketches of the planet taken in various observatories, it is hoped 
that knowledge of its appearance will be increased. 

Little of the detail of Mars has been captured by photography. 
Pictures of the planet showing it all scribbled over with lines and 
little dots where the lines intersect are done by hand, because the 
astronomer has to rely on his eye and sketch-making ability. Most 
students have seen it differently and drawn it differently. Few have 
been able to confirm with their own eyes a map of the planet cut 
up into straight lines and angles. Two of the leading champions 
of the theory that life exists on Mars have been Dr. Lowell and 
Dr. Pickering. The conflicting testimony of these two is set forward 
by Dr. W. W. Campbell, director of Lick Observatory, who says: 

"If two observers so advantageously situated, so capable and so 
enthusiastic as Pickering and Lowell cannot agree better as to 
basic observed facts of the Martin surface features, by virtue of 
studies extending through twenty-seven and twenty-three years, re- 
spectively, what hope is there for ordinary observers to unravel the 
mysteries of the Martian canals? Is it possible that any one has 
been trying to see surface features on Mars which exceed the powers 
of existing telescopes and human eyes?" 

Dr. Lowell put forward grounds which convinced him that Mars 
had a temperate climate, not much colder than that of the earth, 
and that the canals were used to carry water speedily from the 
polar regions to the temperate zones at the season when the polar 
ice-caps thawed, as they were successively inclined toward the sun. 
Dr. Pickering disagreed with most of this, but believed that in the 
color changes on the planet connected with the cycle of climatic 
changes evidence of some kind of life was to be found. The op- 
posite theory is set forward in Popular Astronomy by J. G. Porter 
of the Cincinnati Observatory, who wrote: 

"We shall have during next summer a comparatively favorable 
opportunity for studying the planet Mars and in 1924 conditions 
will be still better, especially in the southern hemisphere. No doubt 
we shall hear a great deal from that school of astronomy of the 



planet and it seems only fair that the more conservative view should 
also be set forth. 

"In the first place it ought to be recognized that the true in- 
terpretation of the surface markings on Mars cannot be arrived at 
by visual or photographic observations alone. The nearest approach 
of Mars to the earth is about 35,000,000 miles. At the next opposi- 
tion, it will be 41,000,000 miles away. Assuming that a magni- 
fying power of 1000 diameters can be employed, this still leaves 
the planet 35,000 miles distant, or considerably more than the cir- 
cumference of the earth. Of course higher magnification is possible, 
but beyond a certain point the advantage of increase in size is 
counterbalanced by the indistinctness and wavering of the image. 
It is safe to say that we cannot at present, and probably never shall, 
be able to see Mars in the telescope as clearly as we should with 
the naked eye at a distance of 25,000 miles." 



DRY ON LAND, WET ON AMERICAN SHIPS 

Pointing to the absurdity, inconsistency and tyranny of enforcing 
prohibition on land and selling all kinds of liquor on American ships 
to obtain passengers, the Spectator of Portland, Ore., says: 

"Many of our ardent prohibitionists are looking forward with 
happy expectancy to the time when the production and consump- 
tion of liquor will come to an end through the death of all who 
drink moonshine whisky. The pleasure of the prospect may be con- 
sidered to be somewhat modified by the fact that while some of 
our wicked whisky drinkers have, indeed, ceased from bibbling, 
the temperate moonshiner continues in numbers like the mustard 
seed and flourishes like the green bay tree. And there is another 
reason why the prohibition of whisky will not become a lost art 
nor its consumption a forgotten pleasure: The government offers 
for our delectation all the liquor we can pay for and consume. 
Those who have availed themselves of the government's liberality, 
declare it is manfiested in the sale and service of liquors much more 
palatable than any of the moonshiners' brew. 

"On ships built with the people's money, operated by the people 
at a great financial loss, and flying the American flag, the govern- 
ment is today selling and serving liquor as openly as anyone did 
before we had the prohibition law which on land our citizens so 
freely violate and on sea the government so frankly flouts. For 
doing these things the people, who are the government, seem to 
have a better excuse than the government, which is the people. In 
their private capacity as citizens the people refuse to obey the pro- 
hibition law because they think it an invasion of their personal lib- 
erty; the government sells and serves liquor to make money. 

"Some of our good citizens, who never in their lives took a little 
wine for their stomachs' sake, will tell us that rather than have 
liquor sold on our ships they would gladly see our merchant marine 
destroyed and the American flag disappear from the seven seas. 

"Many of us have no objection at all to the sale of liquor by 
the government on American ships bought by American taxpayers 
and flying the American flag. The fact that these ships could not 
be operated if their passengers were subjected to the rigors of the 
Volstead act may be accepted as indubitable proof of the fact that 
prohibition is not universally favored. Those citizens who are quite 
willing that Americans who travel on American ships shall have the 
right to enjoy the liquors they like, are humbly but firmly of the 
belief that the same rights should be extended to Americans who 
have neither the time nor the means to travel." 



July 8, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



11 



SHAW'S ADVICE TO AUTHORS 

Bernard Shaw, addressing the Society of 
Authors in London, advised them "not to go 
to lunch with publishers or film persons. If 
you do, do not suppose that because a man 
seems a nice fellow he will not do you. He 
will not exactly do you, but he will exact 
the most he can, and it is not dishonest to 
make the best terms possible. 

"Subsidiary rights, which did not amount 
to much at one time, have become very val- 
uable, and unfortunately publishers seem to 
have no absolute standard of honesty. The 
fact is, the honesty of most people is sen- 
sitive to the pressure put upon it, and while 
nobody in this room would think of stealing 
an umbrella, I doubt if you could resist the 
temptation to appropriate a £ 5000 motor car 
if it could be done legally and with safety. 

"The cinema rights of a single story may 
be worth '10,000 today. I have been offered 
1 10,000 — nay, more, I have been offered 
'20,000 a year for five years if I would agree 
to guarantee two films each year. No doubt 
I have something of a reputation, but that 
does not account for everything. There is a 
famous gentleman in America — from whom 
I get a great deal of money and whose name 
therefore I will not mention — who has been 
trying to induce authors of magazine articles 
to give up their cinema rights. 

"Subsidiary rights in these days may mean 
getting rich beyond the dream of avarice, 
and perhaps that is why we hear of agree- 
ments today which would have made the 
worst sharks of forty years ago blush. The 
truth is that the whole thing is a gamble, 
and producers who make one success in 
twenty ventures want to make that success 
pay for all the failures." 



mbswi 



yet who didn't need a shave," he replied.- 
New York Sun. 



BIGOTRY IN OREGON POLITICS 

In their drive to capture and control nomi- 
nations in the recent Republican primaries, 
the Ku Klux Klan and the Oregon Federa- 
tion of Patriotic Societies, allies, encountered 
defeat. The combination did, however, gain 
a foothold in the legislature — at least in 
Multnomah County, and it is in the legisla- 
ture that the KKK expect to touch off their 
dynamite. 

The secret organizations were unsuccessful 
in their plan to nominate a governor, two 
congressmen, a state labor commissioner, a 
stale public service commissioner, three cir- 
cuit judges in Multnomah County, one state 
senator and one representative. On the other 
hand, they have two nominees for state sena- 
tor, thirteen representatives and two county 
commissioners. Over the latter, they are in 
a row. 

Fortunately for Oregon, the effort of pil- 
low-cased and bed-sheeted bigots to deprive 
a large body of our people of their rights as 
citizens was not very successful. But that in 
this time and age and place the effort was 
made at all is disconcerting. — Portland Spec- 
tator. 



"Why did you tip your hat to that wait- 
er >" 

"It costs too much to tip him with any- 
thing else." — Houston Post. 



Boy (to his dad) : Dad, can you sign your 
name with your eyes shut? 

His Dad: Certainly. 

Boy: Well, then, shut your eyes and sign 
my report card. — Boys' Magazine. 



Doctor: But, my dear sir, I can't pre- 
scribe whisky for you unless I am convinced 
that you need it. What are your symptoms? 

Patient: What symptoms would you sug- 
gest, doctor? — Life. 



Bobby (excitedly) — Some liniment and 
cement, please! 

Druggist — Why both at once? 

"Pa hit ma wid a china cup." — West- 
field Leader. 



Willie — Is Mr. Smith very ill, doctor? 

Doctor — Yes, my boy; it will be months 
before he's about again. 

"Well, you won't forget, will you, it was 
my banana skin he slipped on? — Passing 
Show (London). 



"What makes you think that handsome 
music teacher is mercenary? 

"He charges Betty's father two dollars 
an hour for making love to her." — Boston 
Transcript. 



"They say a rolling stone gathers no 
moss," quoth she. 

"Maybe not, but I never saw a tramp 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP&RIOR 




SAN FRANCISCO LAW SCHOOL 

FOURTEENTH SCHOOL YEAR 
Beginning September 6th, 1922 

Evening Sessions for Men and Women 

A Legal Education Is of Inestimable 
Value in Any Vocation. 

Call or Write for Information 

Third Floor, Cull Building 

74 Now Montgomery Street 

Kearny 4251 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phono Kearny 391 San Francisco 



8>att 


Kvmumn (Eljnmtrlr 

Loading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 










A Newspaper made every 

TO SPEAK TO 


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ay 






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ly 




Order at once the Dally and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for 9 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or 


.15 a month — 
postmaster 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 8, 1922 



(Cociot 



.'Siiuk 







Busy Cupid 

MISS DOROTHY CANFIELD - DAN- 
ZIGER of Los Angeles arrived Mon- 
day from New York. Miss Danziger's en- 
gagement to Bruce Hay Chapman, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Hay Chapman of this 
city, was recently announced in Los Angeles. 
Mr. Chapman arrived in San Francisco last 
Sunday, after stopping at Del Monte for a 
few days with his father. He is connected 
with Balfour-Gutherie and is head of the 
marine insurance department in Los Ange- 
les. The wedding will take place on August 
15 and will be one of the events of the sea- 
son. Miss Danziger is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. J. B. Danziger, well known in the 
Southern city. The couple will go to Hono- 
lulu for their honeymoon and upon return- 
ing will take up their residence in Los An- 
geles. 

— The little Swedenborgian Church at 
Lyon and Washington streets was the scene 
of a pretty wedding Monday afternoon when 
Miss Constance Beardsley, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. William E. Beardsley of New York, 
became the bride of Hugh de Haven, son 
of Mrs. Charles R. Williams. The ceremony 
was held at 3 o'clock. Rev. William Guth- 
rie of the First Congregational Church of- 
ficiating, and was attended by a small group 
of relatives and friends. Miss Louise Bullock 
was the bride's only attendant and E. W. 
Murray was the best man. 

— The marriage of Miss Dorothy Louise 
Hoskinson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George 
T. Hoskinson of Washington, D. C, and 
Sidney Chester de Guerre took place on 
Saturday afternoon at the de Guerre resi- 
dence on Van Ness avenue. Dean J. Wil- 
mer Gresham read the ceremony at 3 o'clock. 
The bridegroom is the son of Mrs. Ida E. 
de Guerre. His sister, Mrs. Parker Stewart 
(Marion de Guerre), was matron of honor 




It is for you to say when you want 
to experience that thrill that comes 
only behind the wheel of a 

PEERLESS MOTOR 
CAR IN ACTION 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St 

Telephone Prospect 8800 



and Arthur Palm of Sacramento was best 
man. Upon their return from their wedding 
tour, Mr. and Mrs. de Guerre will make 
their home in San Francisco. 

— The secret of the marriage of Frank 
Bishop and Miss Anne Helene De Vine of 
New York has been revealed. The couple 
were married on the 23d of June at St. 
Brigid's Church in town, and are at the 
Lodge in Yosemite valley on their honey- 
moon. Frank Bishop is the son of the late 
Thomas Bishop and Mrs. Josephine Hall 
Bishop, and the brother of James Hall Bishop 
and the late Thomas Porter and Edward 
Bishop. 

Luncheons 

— Mrs. George Boyd has purchased a piece 
of land in Bear Valley, one of the wonder 
spots of Marin County, having recently se- 
cured an ideal tract adjoining the grounds 
of the country club. To revive a charming 
old New England custom the Boyds gave 
a "house raising" on the new property Sun- 
day, having about seventy-five relatives and 
friends to enjoy the fun. 

— With so many of the smart folk away 
until after the holiday, there were not so 
many luncheons in the fable room of the 
Hotel St. Francis Monday as usual. Just a 
few of the Burlingame people motored up 
for shopping and lunched informally at the 
St. Francis. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hayes 
Smith had as their guests at their table Miss 
Anne Peters, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster 
Dutton, Leo Carrillo and Frank Keenan. 
Colonel and Mrs. Sydney Cloman were 
lunching with friends, and others seen in 
small parties were Mrs. Thomas B. East- 
land, Mrs. Ritchie L. Dunn, Mrs. A. P. Ho- 
taling and Miss Phelan. 
Teas 

— A pleasant air of holiday leisure and 
repose prevailed at a large tea given on 
Saturday afternoon in honor of Lieutenant- 
Commander and Mrs. Lyman K. Swenson, 
whose return here is being followed with a 
round of informal affairs to welcome them. 
The party, which was given at the Fairmont 
Hotel, brought together many service and 
civilian men and women. Mr. and Mrs. 
George McGowan and Captain and Mrs. 
Charles P. Huff were hosts of the affair. 
Dinners 

— Burlingame Country Club was the set- 
ting for a continuous round of parties be- 
ginning with buffet luncheon at noon. Tues- 
day evening there was a no-host dinner 
dance, with dancing afterward. Among those 
who attended were Mr. and Mrs. George T. 
Marye, Mr. and Mrs. George A. Newhall, 
Colonel and Mrs. Sidney Sloman, Mr. and 
Mrs. Eugene Murphy, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Eastland, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Jackling. 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton, Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph D. Grant, Mr. and Mrs. Robert 



Hayes Smith, Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron, 
Mr. and Mrs. Fentriss Hill, Mr. and Mrs. 
Atholl McBean, Mrs. George Barr Baker, 
Mrs. Mountford S. Wilson, Mrs. James 
Keeney, Mrs. Daniel Murphy, Mrs. George 
Harding and Mrs. Alexander Garceau. 

— Miss Aileen Mcintosh, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Kenneth Mcintosh, was 
hostess at a large dinner dance at the Menlo 
Country Club Monday evening. The guests 
included the young folk in the several larger 
house parties in the Menlo colony. 

— Clement Studebaker III, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Clement Studebaker of South Bend, 
Ind., is visiting in California and is a house 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Weaver. He 
is a cousin of Studebaker Johnson of San 
Rafael, the latter of whom entertained at 
dinner in his honor Monday evening. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Jackling will give a din- 
ner at their apartments at the Hotel St. 
Francis this week in honor of Miss Maud 
Fay and Captain Smyington, who are to be 
married this month. 

In Town and Out 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edward Bosqui returned 
Wednesday to their home in this city, after 
having enjoyed the week end and holidays 
at Del Monte. 

— Dr. and Mrs. Grant Selfridge motored 
to Santa Barbara last Thursday to pass this 
month at El Encanto. 

— The Wm. Stringers and their daughters. 
Misses Claire and Helen Stringer, have taken 
a cottage on the Russian River for the sum- 
mer season. They motored up Friday, tak- 
ing with them as their guest Miss Katherine 
Dorn. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Algernon Crofton, Mr. 
and Mrs. Louis de Laveaga Cebrian and 
Lord Cicil Glerawly left Saturday for a mo- 
tor trip through the southern part of the 
State. 

— George Rose Jr. of New York, who is 
the guest of Richard Schwerin of San Mateo, 
accompanied by his host, Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Parrott and Miss Josephine Grant, mo- 
tored to Monterey Saturday. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Paul T. Carroll are en- 
joying the holidays in the Yosemite and Wa- 
wona. 

— Mrs. Armstrong Taylor is home again 
from New York, where she has been enjoy- 



ARE YOUR GLASSES EXACTLY 
RIGHT? 

—correct for each eye? 

— accurately mounted? 

— fitted BO that you look through the 

exact center of each lens? 

All our glasses are precisely correct in 
every detail. 

W. D. Fennlmoro A. B. Fennlmoro 

J. W. Davis 




:\\ 

San Francisco - 181 PoBt, 2508 Mission Sts. 
Berkeley - - - - 2106 Sliattuck Avenue 
Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 



July 8, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



ing a visit of several weeks and she has 
joined Dr. Taylor at the Fairmont Hotel. 

— Mrs. Pearl Landers Whitney and her 
daughters, Miss Elizabeth and Miss Beryl 
Whitney, have gone to Santa Cruz for a 
part of the summer and they are staying at 
Casa del Rey. 

— Mrs. Chas. C. Moore, who spent several 
days this week at her home in Washington 
street, returned to Santa Cruz. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George H. Tyson of Ala- 
meda arrived at Feather River Inn for an 
extended stay. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Page, Ralston 
Page and Brittain Ray of San Francisco 
spent the week end at Feather River Inn. 

— William Mayo Newhall from San Fran- 
cisco has taken a chalet at Feather River 
Inn for the season. Included in his party 
are Mrs. Newhall, Mrs. Fentriss Hill, and 
Miss Angelica Hill. 

Week-End Parties 

— Several members of the debutante set 
motored down to Pebble Beach to be guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Willis Walker and their son 
Leon Walker over the holiday. The party 
included Miss Mary Martin, Miss Lawton 
Filer, Miss Edith Grant, Miss Edna Taylor, 
William Magee Jr., Harry Crocker, Paul 
Kennedy and Stanley Armour of Chicago 
and Pasadena. 

— Another house party over the week end 
and the Fourth was given by Miss Janice 
Ewer and her brother, Alwyn Ewer, at their 
country home near Rutherford. Miss Rosalie 
Grunbaum and Mr. and Mrs. John Bright 
Burnham joined the party Monday. 

— Miss Mary Emma Flood entertained a 
group of friends from town as her house 
guests over the week end. Among them 
were Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Mcintosh, Miss 
Aileen Mcintosh, Alfred Hendrickson and 
George Montgomery. The party was aug- 
mented Tuesday by a large number of the 
Menlo and Woodside friends of the Floods, 
who motored over for an informal luncheon 
and fireworks in the evening. 

— The George P. Beardsleys and their 
daughter. Miss Barbarba Beardsey, gave a 
delightful party, which included Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Lund Jr., and their daughter. 
Miss Beatrice Lund, who are at the Hotel 
Rafael for the week, and a number of others. 

— Mrs. Alexander Garceau visited at the 
Burlingame home of Mr. and Mrs. George 
T. Marye over the week end and Fourth of 
July. Mr. and Mrs. Marye were hosts at 
two delightfully informal dinners at their 
home on Saturday and Sunday evenings. 

— The Aimer Newhalls had a large house 
party at their charming place at Bolinas 
over the Fourth. 

— At Pebble Beach, where a large con- 
tingent of the Burlingame and San Mateo 
residents passes several months of each sum- 
mer, everything has been in full swing over 
the week end. There have been dinner parties 
in the Palm Grill at the hotel and at the 
lodge every evening, with swimming, golf. 
tennis and polo during the day. 

— At Tahoe swimming and boating races, 
a golf tournament on the new links, tennis 
and a dinner dance was the program for 



the Fourth. The George Newhalls, the Her- 
bert Momtts, the Edward G. Schmiedells, 
the Walter Hobarts and others who have 
large estates on the lake, have their homes 
filled with guests from town for the holiday. 

—William W. Crocker, Mr. and Mrs. Ar- 
thur Hill Vincent, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel F. 
B. Morse, Commander and Mrs. William C. 
Van Antwerp, Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Haldorn, 
Mr. and Mrs. Willis Walker and others of 
the Pebble Beach colony who have lodges 
there had large house parties over the 
Fourth. 

Intimations 

— Miss Alice Requa, the attractive daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Mark L. Requa, and 
Miss Anne Mattingly, two society girls who 
have been taking the course of training at 
Stanford Hospital, have given up their work 
and rejoined the ranks of their sister de- 
butantes. Mrs. Requa has gone South to 
visit her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and 
Mrs. John Henry Russell, in Los Angeles. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Alexander will 
leave New York for California July 8 and 
will be the guests of Mr. and Mrs. William 
H. Crocker at Burlingame. Mr. Alexander 
will go to the Bohemian Grove the middle 
of the month for the annual grove play. 

— Mrs. John Drum and Master John Drum 
Jr. took their departure Saturday for the 
Atlantic Coast. They are going abroad to 
be away several months. During their ab- 
sence Mr. Drum will be at the University 
Club. 

— Dr. and Mrs. Lovell Langstroth have 
purchased the residence of Dr. and Mrs. 
William Boericke in Washington street and 
they will take possession of it in the near 
future. At present the Langstroths are en- 
joying their honeymoon in the South. They 
recently passed several days at the Hotel 
del Monte. 

Garden Fetes 

— Among the attractive celebrations of the 
national holiday was the garden fete and 
supper at the Charles R. McCormick place 
at Menlo Park Monday night. Most of the 
summer colony of Menlo and the vicinity 
were present, and there was a display of 
fireworks and swimming in the outdoor pool. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Milton Esberg entertained 
the Marin set with several friends from town 
at a delightful garden party at their home 
in Ross Monday afternoon. 

— The Marin Golf and Country Club at 
San Rafael was the scene Monday evening 
of a jolly party, the usual celebration given 
each year on the eve of the Fourth of July. 
About a hundred and fifty of the club mem- 
bers and their week-end guests assembled 
at the club for a dinner dance. There were 
countless parties, principally no-host affairs, 
and several smaller ones at which Ross and 
San Rafael society folk entertained their 
guests from out of town. 

At Del Monte 

— One of the most interesting of the com- 
plete and varied program of sports which is 
staged at Del Monte through the year is 
the annual baseball g.ime between the Olym- 
pic Club and Del Monte. The picturesque 
open-air Roman plunge is used to lay out 



a diamond and the players follow out the 
rules of the game the same as on land. The 
difference is that contestants swim and dive 
to the bases instead of running. Water base- 
ball provides many laughs and is really 
quite a competitive sport. The Olympic Club 
has a very strong team and Del Monte will 
have to get in some good licks in order to 
hold the visiting players even. 



Its Patronage Ever Increasing 

Because the Fourth of July dinner at the 
Fairmont Hotel was worthy of the day and 
memorable, it does not follow that dinner 
at the ever popular hotel is not memorable 
by its perfection of cuisine and service on 
every day. The Fairmont's standard is never 
lowered and that is the secret of its ever 
increasing patronage by those who appreci- 
ate what is best. The splendid orchestra at 
the Fairmont cannot be improved. 



BABYLON 

On the Bay at San Carlos 



The most unique and exclusive re- 
sort for motorists on the Coast 
Babylon's Chicken Maryland 

or Duck Dinners $2.50 

Breaktasts and Lunches at 

Reasonable Prices 

SMusic and "Dancing Every Night 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eyebrows arched and moles, warts and 
superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest improved multiple needle ma- 
chine. "Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary Street, Suite 723 Whitney Bid*. 

Phone Douglas 5232 
Onkland, Suite 424, First Natl. Bank Bide. 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

Make Your Reservations 
at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Ballding 

Telephone Sutter 0130 
L'nder Management CARL S. STANLEY 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

• • • • • • 
PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

• • • • • • 
JEWELS In Platinum 

• • • • • • 
REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

• • • • • • 
UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

• • • • • • 
FINE JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 

• • • • • • 

EXPERT Repair Work 







I.K\K\ COST! MK DK8IGJI — 




Fashion Illustration — Pattern Prafttng, 
Work 

CIsmn fl»y ami Kwninc 




1 IPHIOM \< \l>! M\ , lnr. 
llfHIlia Kit* Trmplr 1*»0 MltlT M. 





14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 8, 1922 





Uhnanoal; 




By P. N. BERINGER 



TWO big mergers, involving the use of 
vast capital, have been effected in Cali- 
fornia in tie last week. One was that of the 
large banking interests of Los Angeles and 
the other of steel interests of the Coast and 
of coal interests in Utah. The Los Angeles 
bank merger was that of the First National 
Bank and the Los Angeles Trust and Savings 
Bank. The steel interests consist of the Co- 
lumbia Steel Company of San Francisco and 
other interests devoted to the making of 
steel and of the Utah Coal Company. This 
merger will make a much closer relationship 
between all power-giving activities in this 
State and will bring about a raprochement as 
to the hydro-electric systems and the fuel 
systems, as to gas and coal. We have con- 
cerns making structural and reinforcing steel 
in California but we have none making the 
finer grades of steel. The merger may result 
in the establishment on the Pacific Coast of 
an industry that, in the end, will make us 
independent of the East as far as steel is 
concerned. 

The rate war, as to intercoastal business, 
is going on merrily and there is a great activ- 
ity in rustling for patronage amop- the vari- 
ous steamship companies. Their representa- 
tives may be seen in every direction roosting 
on the trail of the shipper. That shipper is 
now a much sought after individual and he 
is coy and taking advantage of every induce- 
ment that offers to cause him to give his 
freight carrying to one or another of the 
competing carriers. It cannot be denied that, 
prior to the break from conference agree- 
ments, there had been considerable cutting 
going on. At least, steamship company repre- 
sentatives, while stoutly denying that the 
company they represent ever did anything so 
reprehensible as give a rebate or quote a 
discriminatory tariff, stoutly maintain that 
their rivals were given to all kinds of chi- 
canery and underhanded methods. Perhaps it 
is just as well to believe they are all telling 
the truth and leave it at that. It is certain 
that, now the good behavior rule has been 
lifted, they are doing everything they can, 
openly and above board, to get business. 
And, while the merry war lasts, the shipper 
gets the benefit of it and is getting his 
freight from the East for far less than in the 
past. 

All of the companies, in intercoastal carry- 
ing trade by way of the Canal, are doing a 
big business but that was true before the 
rate cutting began. With some of these com- 
panies it has been quite impossible to in- 
crease the tonnage beyond the capacity of 
the vessels to carry it but with rate cutting 
other companies have come into the field 
quite actively and are making a bid to carry 



freight formerly going to the bigger opera- 
tors. Williams, Dimond Company; Lucken- 
bach. Pacific Mail, American-Hawaiian and 
the Williams lines are making every effort in 
the freight getting. 

The effect, as far as the rail carriers are 
concerned, will be bad, as much of the 
freight which has been coming West regu- 
larly by train will find itself coming by the 
Canal. Some of the steamship lines are mak- 
ing much better time than the railroads, at 
least they are claiming they are doing so. If 
the claim is true, then shippers, who may be 
brought over to making shipments by 
steamer, will stay with the steamer lines until 
such time as the rail lines may offer better 
rates and quicker time. 

There is talk among the steamer people of 
the regulation of steamship rates and service 
by the Interstate Commerce Commission, on 
the same basis as that governing the rela- 
tions of the I. C. C. with the rail lines. It is 
doubtful if this may legally be accomplished. 
If it were possible to secure a sensible regu- 
lation of the relationship and rate making 
power of the steamship lines in their relation- 
ship to one another and to the public a great 
good might be accomplished. Managers of 
lines are very doubtful if conference agree- 
ments can ever be made that will be proof 
against those who may wish, underhandedly, 
to break their agreements. 

Despite the expectation of the usual sum- 
mer, or vacation, slump retail trade in San 
Francisco continues good and in some lines 
it is reported to be more than good. 

Import and export business is improving 
very slowly and shipping business, trans- 
Pacific, is feeling the effect of this improve- 
ment. As far as the Latin-American coun- 
tries are concerned trade continues dull and, 
naturally, all related activities to export and 
import — such as marine insurance, forward- 
ing, brokerage — are in a cramped condition. 
Trade with Mexico is showing improvement 
and, if the political relations were on a bet- 
ter footing, much might be accomplished. 
The big difficulty in Mexico seems to be in- 
ternal and the people lack absolute con- 
fidence in the stability of the Obregon Gov- 
ernment. The country has had such sorry 
experiences with those preceding President 
Obregon and his cabinet that it is not to be 
wondered at they seem to believe the present 
government is sitting on a barrel of dyna- 
mite. Despite all this, however, if business 
men in this country showed greater initiative 
and a desire to establish trade relations, if 
the banks in this country took an interest in 
reviving trade with Mexico, by extending 



time on loans, business, of quite a large mag- 
nitude, might be created in a very short time. 
In export and import circles, except in New 
York, in banking circles everywhere, when it 
comes to a question of foreign trade expan- 
sion and the extension of credits, through 
longer time for payment, there is such a woe- 
ful apathy that matters, at times, assume al- 
most a hopeless cast. 

China and Ireland are nearing peace by 
the same road, the road of internal blood- 
letting, and the probability is that both these 
countries are at length within sight of the 
much-desired peace. China has cleared her 
decks of the smaller factional troubles and 
the military geniuses, Wu Pei Fu and Gen- 
eral Cheng Chiung Ming have apparently 
come to an agreement as to a united China. 
Nothing now remains except to pacify, or 
jail, Sun Yat Sen. Minor troubles, in the 
way of continued peace, will be found in 
making satisfactory settlement with the Tu- 
chuns or provincial chieftains. The proba- 
bility is that drastic action will be taken by 
the Pekin government to destroy the Tuchun 
power. 

As far as Ireland is concerned, it seems 
the Free State Government has finally come 
to a decision not any longer to parley with 
the criminal element of the rebellious so- 
called Republican army. Sedition to the au- 
thority must be stamped out or the Free 
State be trampled out of existence itself in 
the struggle for supremacy. Very good prog- 
ress has been made and the ringleader of the 
insurgents is in the hands of the Free State 
government together with most of his imme- 
diate followers. It is to be hoped the gov- 
ernment of Ireland will not deal leniently 
with the traitors or the whole thing will have 
to be done over again at a later date. The 
question now has resolved itself into whether 
Irishmen are capable of governing them- 
selves and the treatment of the rebels will 
give answer to that question. 

It is essential to world peace and essential 
to world prosperity that war shall cease in 
Ireland and in China. Let us all pray for 
peace for these two distracted countries. 

Reports from the Silver Pick, Red Top 
Lease, continue good and there is every indi- 
cation that a big mine is on the way to ex- 
tensive development. Nevada is showing in- 
terest in Silver Pick and Goldfield is watching 
every development in the mine. Shipments 
to the mill are made regularly and are very 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 



COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 



Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 



362 BllBh SI reel 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 



July 8. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



15 



satisfactory indeed. We shall have more to 
say as to Silver Pick next week and those of 
our readers who may be interested will be 
quite well satisfied. 



The Realm of Bookland 



A book which every thoughtful American 
should read is "America Faces the Future," 
by Durant Drake, professor of philosophy at 
Vassar College, and author of several good 
works for serious readers. Americanism is 
an engrossing subject, and in "America Faces 
the Future" Professor Durant Drake de- 
scribes not what we are, but what we ought 
to be. He asks his readers to consider what 
our priceless heritage to American ideal ac- 
tually is. 

The American spirit, he says, is continu- 
ally endangered by sectionalism, class rifts, 
the selfishness of the fortunate, the bitterness 
of the unfortunate, the cynicism of the so- 
phisticated, the complacency of the pros- 
perous. "We do not want to rubber-stamp 
our fellows; but we do want to produce a 
common devotion to the dreams that have 
made our nation great." 

The titles of the five parts indicate the 
book's general contents: Labor, Equality, 
Democracy, Efficiency and Patriotism. The 
author is a liberal thinker, who regards 
soundly progressive principles as the best 
cure for social unrest and violent radical- 
ism. Published by the Macmillan Company, 
New York. Price $2.50. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 

THESANFRANCISCOSAVINGSANDLOANSOCIETY 

526 California Street. San Francisco 
Mission Branch, Mission and Twenty-first Sts. 
Park-Frestdlo Diet. Branch, Clement and 7th Av. 
Huiglit street It ranch, Haight and Belvedere Sts. 



JUDAS IS UNPOPULAR 

The peasant actor who has the part of 
Judas in the passion play at Oberammergan 
is a very good natural actor and it has been 
suggested that he should receive double sal- 
ary on account of his talents, as well as 
for compensation for his unpopular role. In 
the Middle Ages such distinction was made 
for the injury done an actor's character. But 
the present Judas is satisfied to share equally 
with the other peasant actors. He admits 
though that the part of Judas creates popu- 
lar prejudice. Recently while working at his 
carving bench, the door of his workshop 
opened and a peasant woman from the moun- 
tains came in, stood still, and gazed at him 
intently. On asking her what she wanted, 
she said: 

"1 saw you in the play yesterday. 1 wished 
to look at you again. You look so like my 
husband. He is dead. He. too, was a very 
bad man." 



For the half year ending June 30th. 1922. a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
and one-quarter (4Vi ) per cent per annum on 
all deposits, payable on and after July 1st, 
1922. Dividends not called for are added to the 
deposit account and earn dividend from July 1st, 
1922. Deposits made on or before July 10th, 
1922. will earn interest from July 1st. 1922. 

GEO. TOURNY. Manager. 

BANK OF ITALY 
BANK OF ITALY, junction Market, Powell and 
Eddy sts. ; Montgomery Street Branch, S. E. 
corner Montgomery and Clay sts. ; Market- 
Geary Branch, junction Market, Geary and 
Kearny sts. ; Mission Branch, 3246 Mission St., 
near 29th st. ; Park-Presidio Branch, Clement 
st. and 9th ave. ; Polk-Van Ness Branch, 1541 
Polk st. ; Eureka Valley Branch, junction Mar- 
ket, 17th and Castro sts. ; Sunset Branch, Sth 
ave. and Irving — For the half-year, ending June 
30, 1922, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all sav- 
ings deposits, payable on and after JULY 1, 
1922. Dividends not called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of interest as the principal 
from July 1, 1922. Deposits made to and in- 
cluding Julv 10, 1922. will earn interest from 
July 1, 1922. P. C. HALE 

Vice-President. 

MERCANTILE TRUST COMPANY 

MERCANTILE TRUST COMPANY, Head of- 
fice, 4 64 California street ; Savings Union 
Branch, Market street at Grant avenue and 
OFarrell street, San Francisco. Also branches 
at Berkeley, California. (Member Federal Re- 
serve System.) For the half year ending June 
30. 1922, a dividend bus been declared on sav- 
ings deposits at the rate of Four (4) per cent 
per annum, payable on and after SATURDAY, 
JULY 1, 1922. A dividend not drawn will be 
added to the deposit account, become a part 
thereof, and earn dividend from July 1. 1922. 
Deposits made on or before July 10, 1922. will 
earn interest from July 1. 1922. 

WILLIAM A. MARCUS, Cashier. 

ITALIAN AMERICAN RANK 

ITALIAN AMERICAN BANK. s. E. corner 
Montgomery and Sacramento sts.; North Beach 

Branch, corner Columlms ave. ami Broadway— 

For the half-year ending jum b divi- 
dend has been declared al ti ■ ■ Poui i I i 

pel cei i annum on all savings deposits, pay- 
able "ii and after JULY I, 19*2. i livideno 
called for will be 

bear the sum.- rate of Interest from July I. 1922, 
Deposits made on or before July 10, 1923, will 
earn Interei I from July l, i B 

A. 9BARBORO, President 

THE FRENCH VHBRIOAN RANK 

THE FRENCH AMERICAN BANK I 

rtment), 108 Sutter St.— For the half-year 
b dividend has !•• 
Glared al the rate of Four ii> per cent i><-r an- 
num on :iii deposits, payable on and after Jl Ll 
i, 1922. Dividends nol railed fur are added to 
and bear the same rate "f Interest ;is the princi- 
pal fn>m .luiv i. 1922 Deposits made on <»r be- 
fore July 10, 1928, will earn Interest fmm July 
I, 19 - B1 tCQUERAZ, 

ilent. 



"We are offering this de luxe set at $200 
to only a few cultured people in each com- 
munity." 

"And where do you get your list of cul- 
tured people?" 

"Right out of Bradstreet."— Louisville 
Courier-Journal. 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SO- 
CIETY, corner Market. McAllister and Jones sts, 
— For the half-year ending June 30, 1922, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of Four 
I I) per cent per annum on all deposits, payable 
on or after JULY 1, VXZi. Dividends not drawn 
will be added to depositors' accounts become 9 
part thereof, and will earn dividends from July 
1, 1922. Deposits made on or before July 
10, 1922, will earn interest from July 1, 1922. 
R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 

FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY 

FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY, corner 
Montgomery and Post sts. — For the half-year 
ending June 30, 1922, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of Four (4) per cent per 
annum on all savings deposits, payable on and 
after JULY 1, 1922. Dividends not called for 
are added to deposit account and earn dividend 
from July 1, 1922. Deposits made on or before 
July 10, 1922, will earn interest from July 1, 
1922. M. R. CLARK, 

Cashier. 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN 
FRANCISCO 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO, Market street at Grant avenue — For the 
half-year ending June 30, 1922, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of Four (4) per cent 
per annum on all savings deposits, payable on 
and after SATURDAY, July 1, 1922. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same 
rate of interest as the principal from July 1. 
L922, Money deposited on or before July 10, 
1922, will earn interest from July 1, 1922. 

F. J. BRICKWEDEL, Cashier. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS RANK 

HUMBOLDT 1 SAVINGS BANK, 783 Market 
street, near Fourth — For the half-year ending 
June 30, 1922, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all 
savings deposits, payable on and after July 1. 
1922. Dividends nut called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of interest as the principal 
from July 1. 1922. Deposits made on or before 
Julv 10 1922. will earn interest from July 1, 
1922 H. r. KI .KVKSAHL. Cashier. 

OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

".Made a little better than seems necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 

durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 

plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 

are sold In similar boxes containing one 

ed sheets. Order through your printer or 

Btatloner, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 

book showing the entire lint-. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
.17-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



BELVEDERE 

Rent or Sell— Attractive Home 

Bight Booms, Two Bathe, Furnished 

s\\ GERONIMO 

Delightful Home. Furnished — Six n»nu. 

baths, old Ivory finish throughout; 

APPLY DR. I!. \V. HAINES 
Doagtai S43S MtOsarj Bfc. ■»■ WtmoIsss 



The Departing Guest — Don't let me miss 
my train. 

Chauffeur — No fear o' that. sir. Guv'nor 
said if I did, it"d cost me my job I — London 
Opinion. 




MILLS & HAGBOM 

Satlnra 



New Location, ALEXANDER BUILDING 
155 Montgomery St., Cor. Bush 




REDWOOD LODGE and BUNGALOWS 

1\ TIIF III \KT HI Tilt -l\r\ < Kt 7 Mot NT \l\ 1'.. I alili.he.i 

V RIlMlxtll RI -ll KT FOB « 1 I K I \ ll \ Ml PI R M X M \ T 1. 1 1 - I 1 VMnl ~ I "It 

HOSPITALITY— GOOD Ml ll< \M> IMKI THIS! I-BOI K HKII I n> I K Mil MM 

t.ATO- -ISTI < Rt / BIOHWA1 — III'IV Till w:\K Kill Mi 

V*k \ny S. P. Ticket \cent: <r* Pfck-J nili.li ( .. . *:: HariMl (ML. **n tranri.r... or CiaMlM*l 

ll iklnnii. or Addrr.. \ P. ( ll\. IT..,. . H'RII.IITv I VI 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 8, 1922 




PL/EASURE/S WAND 



Century 

Oliver Morosco presents the best laugh 
producer of the season, "Abie's Irish Rose." 
There is a large cast engaged in the busi- 
ness of making the audience giddy with too 
much merriment, a fact which need not ob- 
scure the deeper interest with its moral. As 
may be expected by the title, the play is 
an admixture of Irish and Hebrew life with 
the comedy possibilities incident to the com- 
bination developed to the nth degree. 

Barbara Brown is a charming Rose and 
Harold Shubert as Abie completes the prin- 
cipal couple, while Sidney Franklin and 
Billy Fay, who are fathers of the young- 
sters, deserve a great deal of praise. Many 
others appear and each fits into the cast 
with precision. There is enough interest of 
one sort or another to appeal to everybody, 
and its long run in the South prior to com- 
ing here can easily be understood. The hu- 
mor is of the pleasantest; nothing offensive 
has been injected into a single line, which 
is more than can be said of many similar 
comedies. For a series of good laughs and 
a few hours continuous enjoyment, this play 
can unreservedly be recommended. 



Orpheum 

Mildred Harris is the headliner this week 
in "Movie Madness," a bit to do with the 
profession she has lately been engaged in. 
There is nothing startling in it, though Miss 
Harris is a very attractive blond who wears 
interesting garments and affects peculiar 
fans. Those who missed Duci De Kerekjarto 
last week should not lose this last opportun- 
ity. He is well worth hearing several times, 
for that matter. The same might be said of 
Leo Carrillo, who is also a holdover. We have 
rarely seen a hard-shoe rattler of more abil- 
ity than Bill Robinson. He surely can shake 
his boots and grin. My, what a smile! Worth 
going to see. 

The two American Orientals, Chong and 
Rosie Moey, do a few domestic jazz numbers 
which don't seem so alluring as the real 
Chinese noise would. It would probably have 
been more interesting to have heard them 
before they learned English. The Carroll 
Revue has not been changed since last week 



SAM FRANCISCO 



\n Nftvjot<nvxt 




i 



MA ™ 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 

and Loges 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

and Betty Martin and Philip Moore swing 
about in the air for the closing number. 




California 

Mary Miles Minter makes an appearance 
after a long absence in "South of Suva," 
a tale of the Fiji Islands. Action galore, 
some high-class acting, good choice of lo- 
cations and fine direction combine to make 
this piece thoroughly interesting. The sub- 
ject is rather wild at times, but on the whole 
the story is not displeasing. There is a thrill- 
ing rescue by a likeable hero and an ending 
quite in accord with expectations. 

The Guatemala Marimba Band lends a 
bit of life to the other part of the program, 
while Severi and his orchestra come in for 
some of the applause. Short fill-ins com- 
plete the bill. 



Portola 

"De Luxe Anne," starring Norma Tal- 
madge and Eugene O'Brien, is offered for one 
week. This picture was made some time ago, 
but can be stood again for the benefit of 
those who missed it. With a good plot, ex- 
cellent direction and these two popular play- 
ers, it is well worth taking in. In addition 
to this feature, there are short reels and or- 
chestra selections. 



Granada 

"The Woman Who Walked Alone" sounds 
a lot more entertaining than it turns out to 
be. In spite of Dorothy Dalton, Milton Sills, 
Wanda Hawley, Maurice Flynn and several 
others of note, this film seems to lack the 
necessary punch to put it over. There are 
doubtless some who will be thrilled and 
others who will not be bored to death, but 
few will call it a huge success. 

Mr. Parkington again offers his usher- 
ettes, this time in a special Fourth of July 
revue. He has several talented girls in the 
group, but some of his other offerings are 
preferable. Someone found Miss Francoeur 
to sing a rather stale popular song, while 
Ash is also there with his long hair, smile 
and little finger. Short numbers complete 
the bill. 



Zane Grey Story at Imperial 

This author seems to be getting about as 
popular in the films as the bookstores. "The 
Last Trail" is crowding the Imperial with 
both kinds of Grey's followers and we must 
admit that the screen version makes more 
of a story than the original. Eva Novak 
is the heroine and Maurice Flynn the near- 
ly-lynched agent, while Rosemary Theby, 
Walace Beery and Chas. K. French do good 
supporting work. Prior and his ensemble 
offer several good numbers. 



Alcazar Has "Main Street" 

The "Main Street" drama is a worthy 
successor to Lewis' muchly read book. Small 
town glory and narrow mindedness is per- 



sonified with great fidelity to the village life 
familiar to so many of us, while the foreign 
element, as typified by the town doctor's 
wife, is worked without an attempt at com- 
parison or an unjust partiality. Her faults 
are there, the same as the failings of the 
others, and both come out in the process of 
the play. There are six scenes, much dia- 
logue and a smoothness that carries it along 
to a satisfactory conclusion. 

Herbert Heyes portrays the country doc- 
tor with great success while Gladys George 
is sweet and perserving as the reforming 
wife. Many new ones are in the company 
for this production, it requiring a large cast. 
Of the regulars, Ben Erway as Erick and 
Charles Yule as Sam Clark are particularly 
good and Miss Van Buren's work is worthy 
of commendation, the more so because her 
part was not the choicest, from her stand- 
point. The lessons in this play are such that 
would apply to many of the listeners, while 
the part of American life shown should make 
it attractive to nearly everyone. 




ack 




excursions 

#ftfl22 Chicago 

KJ^J'^ and. BacK~ 

proportionate reductions 
to other points 

on sale daily 
to August 31 

Liberal Stopovers #* 

Tickets to and from Europe 

AU lrans-Atlantic 

Steamship Lines 

R.D.Johnson Diy. Pass.dgmb 

601 Market St. SanFrancisco 

'phont. Sutter J600 

GrandCan?onLine 



July 8, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



17 



Strand's Long Bill 

One always gets plenty of action in a Tom 
Mix picture. In addition, there is a wonder- 
ful lot of fine photography of the Grand 
Canyon of Colorado in "Sky High," now 
showing on the same bill as the expose of 
the sawn woman. This latter film is very 
interesting and only goes to show that the 
most baffling mystery is, after all, very sim- 
ple when one is on the "inside." This week's 
bill is one of the longest this theater has put 
on for some time, and one of the most in- 
teresting. There are current topic films be- 
sides the above, the regular Mutt and Jeff 
cartoon and Fitzpatrick's excellent musical 
selections. 



Next Week's Orpheum Bill 

John Steel, one of the greatest of Ameri- 
can tenors, will be on next week's bill at the 
Orpheum. The other notable artists to ap- 
pear will be: Theodore Bekefi and his com- 
pany, marvelous Russian dancers; Kane and 
Herman, "Two Midnight Sons," who can 
sing and make you laugh; Mildred Harris, a 
legitimate star, in her skit, "Movie Mad"; 
Flo Lewis, who is charming in comedy and 
songs; Bill Robinson, "The Dark Cloud of 
Joy"; Snell and Vernon, in their artistic di- 
version; Butler and Parker call their act 
"Don't Make Me Laugh," because they con- 
vulse the audience. 



Pacific Players 

The Pacific Players, under the direction 
of Nathaniel Anderson, announce for Fri- 
day evening, July 28, their sixth production 
at the Sorosis Hall Little Theater, 536 Sut- 
ter street. They are to give an original pro- 
duction of a comedy, "The Boor," by the 
well-known Russian writer, Anton Tchekoff, 
and will also produce "The Baby Carriage," 
a Jewish play by Bosworth Crocker. The lat- 
ter was given its first representation by the 
Provincetown Players in New York City. 

Prominent among the players who will ap- 
pear are Paul Merrick, Mr. Anderson, Winni- 
fred Buster, Helen Siebert and Mary Joss 
Jones. 



Alcazar Next Week 

The tremendous popularity of "Main 
Street," which is being brilliantly presented 
by the Alcazar, was responsible for the con- 
tinuance of this great stage play for an ad- 
ditional week, beginning Sunday matinee, 
July 9. 

Manager Lionel B. Samuel had already 
arranged for the production of "Nightie 
Night," but this has been postponed for one 
week and it will be produced beginning with 
the Sunday matinee, July 16. 



Golf Championship at Del Monte 
The two eighteen-hole golf courses at Del 
Monte have been reconstructed and altered 
so that they rank today with the best to be 
found any place. California State Champion- 
ships are the annual feature at Del Monte 
and the date of the tournament this year has 
been set for September 2 to 10. The hotel 
and the lodge will be taxed to capacity dur- 
ing that time. 



Reynolds Spring Building Radios 

Reports of last week that several concerns 
in the automobile industry are looking with 
favor on the growth of wireless telephony 
are confirmed. The Reynolds Spring Com- 
pany, of Jackson, Mich., mentioned in that 
connection, but unidentified, has a contract 
with the DeForest Radio Telephone and Tele- 
graph Co. for the manufacture of complete 
radio instruments. The contract amounts to 
the tidy volume of $5,000,000. 



Paying in Advance 

An autoist who had the habit of driving 
somewhat faster than the law allowed was 
haled before a local justice who imposed 
a fine of fifteen dollars. The autoist drew 
a roll of bills and laid a sum of money on 
thedesk and started to leave the room. 

"Here!" the justice called. "There are 
thirty dollars here." 

"That's all right. Keep it. I am going 
out of town faster than I came in." — Judge. 

Mrs. Jones found Mrs. Smith, the aviator's 
wife, in tears. 

"Whatever is the matter, my dear?" she 
asked, anxiously. 

"I'm worrying about Harold," said Mrs. 
Smith. "He's been trying for a week to kill 
our cat, and as a last resource he took her 
up in his plane. He said he would take her 
up two thousand feet and flrop her over the 
side. 

!!,^ el ''„ wnat is tnere to w °rry about?" 
Lots" exclaimed the frantic woman. 
Harold isn't home yet and the cat is "— 
Harpers Magazine. 



Religious Kitten* 

An old Irishwoman in a certain village 
was trying to dispose of some new-born kit- 
tens. She offered them to the minister, say- 
ing that they were such nice Protestant kit- 
tens. In spite of that inducement he refused 
them, and had a good laugh with the priest 
over her words. 

A few weeks later she offered the kittens 
to the priest, saying that they were such nice 
Catholic kittens. He reminded her that she 
had offered them to the minister as Protes- 
tant kittens, to which she replied: "Sure, 
Father, I know that — but they've had their 
eyes opened since then!" — Judge. 



He: George has filed a voluntary peti- 
tion in bankruptcy. 

She: Another one of those Wall Street 
failures? 

He: No. He had his car overhauled. 



A Matter of Form 

Tourist (in village notion store) : Whad- 
dya got in the shape of automobile tires? 

Saleslady: Funeral wreaths, life-preserv- 
ers, invalid cushions and doughnuts. — Life. 

NOTICE 

In the Superior Court ot the State of California 
in and for the City and t'.ui.l.y of San Fran- 
cisco. 

In the matter of the application of the San Fran- 
cisco News Letter and California Advertiser, 
to be declared a newspaper of general cir- 
culation under the provisions of section 4460 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Notice is hereby given that Frederick Marriott 
has filed in the above entitled court a petition 
alleging that the San Francisco News Letter and 
California Advertiser, is and ever since July 
20. 1856. has been a newspaper established, 
printed and published at regular intervals, 
namely, on each Saturday, excepting the Sat- 
urday following the great fire of April 18. 1006. 
for the dissemination of local and telegraphic 
news and intelligence of general character and 
having a bonafide subscription list of paying 
subscribers, ;ind that it has been declared to be 
a newspaper of general circulation by decree 
of the above entitled court given in or about 
the year 1880. but that the records thereof have 
b.a-n destroyed and asking that it be adjudged 
and decreed to be a newspaper of general cir- 
■ illation within the provision of section 4460 
ot the Political Code of the state of California. 
Said order will be applied for before Depart- 
ment Mo. i of the above entitled court 
upon Tuesday, September 8, 1922. at the hour 
Of 10 a. m. at which time and plnce any person 
Ited may appear and show cause if am 
have why said petition should not be 

granted, 

Dated June 28. i !. l' j . 

FREDERICK ICABRII ITT 

C. F. Adams. Attorney at Law, 703 Market St. 



Fire, Earthquake, Automobile, Use and Occupancy, Riot and Civil Commotion, Explosion, 
Plate Glass, Fidelity and Surety Bond 

INSURANCE 
THE LONDON & LANCASHIRE INSURANCE CO., Ltd. 

LONDON, BMQLAKD Incorporated met 

ORIENT Insurance Co. of Hartford, Conn. LAW UNION & ROCK Insurance Co., Ltd. 
Incorporated ih<;~ or London — Founded ikoo 

LONDON & LANCASHIRE INDEMNITY COMPANY of America 

Organised under the lows of tae Btete of N«n York — Ensorporased Jasraary, 19U 

Pacific Department: 332 Pine Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Geo. Ormond Smith, Manager 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America*' 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE. WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



VACATION NOTICE 

Bnboertberi «le«irinc the >:»n Krunri-co \rw« Letter forwarded 
to their mi turner nddrOH during the ineation period -houhl 

Plioxi: DOI GIsAfl 

Or Write to the OfHre. 23.» Montgomery Street No extra rharge for thi* *erTiee 

SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



18 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gough 
Telephone Park 271 



The Whole Story ! 

"My gums are a hundred per cent 
better. Find enclosed $1.00 for an- 
other treatment." — Mrs. M. F. M., 
San Jose, Calif. 

Mrs. M. F. M. has been using 

PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's 
Home Treatment for 

Pyorrhea and Sore Gums 

Package with directions postpaid for 
$1.00 

Phone or write today 

DR. W. W. HO AG LAND 

908 Market St., San Francisco 

(Mention News Letter) 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Meats Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. Leidesdorff 



Dr. Susan Harris Hamilton 

OSTEOPATH 
SPECIALIZING In NERVOUS DISEASES 

ST. PAUL BLDG. 291 GEARY ST. 

Hours — 10 a.m. to 12 m.. 2 to 4 p.m. 
Phones — Douglas 226, Prospect 15 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

The Automobile 



July 8, 1922 



Large Expenditures on Highways 

The average cost per square yard of va- 
rious types of paving for country roads 
have been compiled by the Department of 
Agriculture and recently published. The fig- 
ures, covering 68,000,000 square yards con- 
structed with Federal aid during the period 
1916-1921, are: Sand-clay, 18 cents; 
gravel, 46 cents; plain and surface-treated 
macadam, 95 cents; bituminous macadam, 
$2.10; bituminous concrete, $2.50; plain 
cement concrete, $2.57; reinforced concrete, 
$2.74, and brick, $4.10. These figures do 
not cover the cost of grading. 

The average cost per mile of road con- 
structed during the five-year period runs 
from $8115 for graded and drained high- 
ways to $39,540 for concrete and $49,570 
for brick. Federal aid, totalling $211,135,- 
376 was at the average rate of $7500 a mile. 
The total estimated cost of roads built in 
the period under discussion was $496,151,- 
683 for 28,135 miles. 



Phelps Holds Open House 

George Harrison Phelps, who resigned as 
director of advertising for Dodge Brothers 
several weeks ago, is now established in his 
own headquarters at 110 Rowena street, 
Detroit, where he is operating an advertising 
agency. He is located in a remodelled man- 
sion, where his housewarming, on April 1 , 
was all that a housewarming should be. Inci- 
dently, Phelps is to be without a direct 
successor at Dodge Brothers, as he will con- 
tinue to give his close personal attention to 
that account, with which he has been directly 
identified ever since the business was or- 
ganized in its present form. 



One Made Every Twelve Seconds 
Latest reports from the Department of 
Commerce show that 196,512 passenger au- 
tomobiles were produced in the United States 
in April. This amounts to 7500 cars for 
each working day, or one every 12 seconds. 
The total was 30 per cent more than March 
and the largest since compilation of the fig- 
ures by the department, which was under- 
taken some ten months ago. 

Norman Bell on Tour 
Norman Bell, assistant sales manager of 
the Norma Company, of America, has been 
in the South on a two months' trip, during 
which he spread the gospel of Norma bear- 
ings throughout his trade. Bell's itinerary 
took him through the Southwest and back 
by way of California and the northern route. 



McConnell Touring Country 

D. A. McConnell, president of the Klaxon 
Company, Newark, N. J., is making an ex- 
tensive tour of the country, calling on dis- 
tributors in the South, Middle West and on 
the Pacific Coast. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 




WE KNOW HOW 

Your car is piling up a big repair bill 
every mile you drive without proper 
lubrication. You can depend upon 

LOYAL AND EFFICIENT SERVICE 
at the 

DE LUXE GARAGE & SERVICE STATION 

Post and Hyde Sts. Phone Franklin 3 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1171 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Watch Your Feet 




Weak, fallen or broken arches reduce 
your efficiency, cause headache, back- 
ache, sciatica, pelvic and stomach trou- 
ble, as well as other ailments. 

THE POST SYSTEM 

for foot correction restores the flexi- 
bility and resiliency of the feet. 

The Post System for Foot Correction 
259 Geary Street, San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6147 



I 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 

Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept., 1921 




.$ 25,000,000.00 
.. 17,500,000.00 



25,000,000.00 



.$ 67,500,000.00 



.$359,326,760.00 



OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

359 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, 

Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of 

Australasian Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of Calif., National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bk., Crocker Nat'l Bk. 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1922 

Assets $76,170,177.18 

Deposits 72,470,177.18 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - - - 2,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund - 385,984.61 

A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4 54 ) per cent 
per annum was declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more seeure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3 4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

TBid Vp Capltnl SIS.OOO.OOO Tot«l Agfitts Orer M79.000.OO0 $15,000,000 K — am Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

4S5 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG : NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 



San Francisco Office: 
RRVCE HEATIK OTE. H— gW 



180 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. .1. COVI.THARP. Assistant Manager 




N. W. CORNER 

POtK and POST STS. 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per (lay; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six- Floors for Service and Storage 
of Automobiles 



We Stand for the Best in Business 
Training 



Munson ( 




PRIVATE SECRETARIES 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 
Send for Catalog 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Krar.klin 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon ( 1 1 :SO to 2 p. m.) .... 75C 

Dinner, Week Days Sl.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays SI. 75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

•Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 






COMBINED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 
HEAD OFFICE AM) BRANCHES 

BANK 
OF ITALY 



SAVINGS COMMERCIAL TRUST 

HEAD OFFICE. SAX FRANCISCO 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 

June 20, 1922 



RESOURCES 



on Real Estate. .X7S.139.123.4T 

uunts r.9,93T,603.H2 X133.0(i0,T32.29 



First MurtBBfi-e Loans 
Other Loans and Dis« 



United States Bonds and 

Certificates of Indebtedness $24,297,100.40 

State. County and Municipal Bonds..-. 9.274.541.01 

Other Bonds 11,075,670.70 

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank 375,000.00 



TOTAL U. S. AND OTHER 

SECURITIES 

Due from Federal Reserve Bank X 9,086.109.30 

Cash and Due from Other Banks 14,711,553.79 

TOTAL CASH AND DUE FROM 

BANKS 

Banking Premises, Furniture. Fixtures 

and Safe Deposit Vaults 

Other Real Estate Owned 

Customers' Liability under Letters of 

Credit and Aeeeptanees 

Interest Earned but Not Collected 

Employees' Pension Fund (Carried on Books at) 

Otiier Resources 

TOTAL RESOURCES 

LIABILITIES 

DEPOSITS 

Dividends Unpaid 

Discount Collected but Not Earned 

Reserved for Taxes and Interest Accrued 

Letters of Credit, Acceptances and Time Drafts 



45.022,312.17 



23,797,723.09 



1,434.70 

1,537.39 

922.43 
780.16 
1.00 
389.65 
833.38 



1.010 
1,638 



S196.437 
60 I 



264 
1.010 



106.90 
682.50 



793.20 
022.43 



"Capital Paid in Xlo.OOO.OOO.OII 

"Surplus 2.5OO.O00.00 

I ndivided Profits 2.692,236.00 



S198.392.596.4X 



TOTAL CAPITAL. SURPLUS AND 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS X 15.192 



TOTAL LIABILITIES X2 13,584,833.88 



•By the issue of 50,000 additional shares of stock in .Inly. 1922. the 

PAID IN CAPITAL will be Increased to 815,000,000 

and SURPLUS to $5,000,000 

All charge-offs, expenses and interest payable to end of half-year 
have been deducted in above statement. 



The Story of Our Growth 

As Shown by a Comparative Statement of our Resources 

December. 1904 $285,4 36.97 

December, 1908 $2,574,004.90 

December, 1912 $11,228,814.56 

December, 11)16 $89,805,095.24 

December, 1920 ..$157,464,685.08 

December, 1921 $194,179,449.80 

June 29, 1922 $213,584,833.38 

NXJMBEK OF DEPOSITORS, 343,653 

Savings Depoflltd made to ami Including; July 10, 1922, will earn 
interest from July 1, 1922 



First Federal Trust Company 

Affiliated with 
The First National Bank of San Francisco 

Savings Commercial Trust 

Post and Montgomery Streets 

Statement of Condition June 30, 1922 



RESOURCES 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate $ 9,485,555.88 

Other Loans and Discounts 2,603,097.52 

State, County and Municipal Bonds 1,902,994.37 

Corporation Bonds 2,927,563.74 

Real Estate Owned 8,141.71 

Furniture and Fixtures 52,833.04 

Other Resources 5,867.63 

United States Bonds 2,260,584.11 

United States Treasury Notes and 

Certificates 1,734,082.50 

Cash and Due from Banks 3,347,111.05 

Total $24,327,811.55 

LIABILITIES 

Capital $ 1 ,500,000.00 

Surplus 425,000.00 

Undivided Profits 385,169.88 

Other Liabilities 46,322.06 

Dividends Unpaid 45,000.00 

Deposits 21,926,319.61 

Total $24,327,811.55 

OFFICERS 

Rudolph Spreckels President 

Clinton ]•:. Worden Vice-Presidenl 

O. K. Cushing Vice-President 

J. <;. Hooper Vice-President and Manager 

R. R. Pardow Vice-President and Secretary 

C. H. McCormlck - Treasurer 

11. R. Clark I :ashier 

I,. A. McCrystle Trust Officer 

C. B. Hobson Realty Loan OITlcer 

S. W. Drascovich Assistant Secretary 

(!. W. Hall Assistant Secretary 

A. E. Curtis Assistant Cashier 

W. H. Cameron Assistant Cashier 

J. H. Eastman Assistant Trust Officer 



Wyatt H. Allen 
John K. Brooke 
O. K. Cushing 
J. < ;. Hooper 
Thomas Jennings 



DIRECTORS 

Clifton II Kroll 

Walter S. .Mail in 

it, D. McElroy 

J. K. Moltltt 
James D. Phelan 



W. T. Smitb 
Howard Spreckels 

Rudolph Sprt-rkt-ls 
Rolls V. Watt 
Clinton E. Worden 



Savings Deposits made on or before July 10, 1922, will earn 
interest from July 1, 1922 






Established July 20, 1850 



I? lews 

4^fc 9ft AND 




P RICE „ cents JAX pAYERS WE EKLY !,PE ™ 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, JULY 15, 1922 



LOS ANGELES 




\ 









EARLY SAX FRANCISCO (No. 14). THE FIFTH OF THE GREAT FIRES Til XT DEVASTATED SAN FRANCISCO 

The Great Ftre of May :l ami 4, I8S1. Loss over $6,000,000. This was the fifth of the big fires that devastated the young city, 
and the damage exceeded that of the four preceding fires combined. It swept up Kearny street and destroyed whole blocks on 
both sides. Gunpowder was freely used to blow up buildings, but nothing in that day furnished adequate aid to stop the advance 
of the roaring flames. The burned area was three-quarters of a mile long and one-third of a mile wide. The wall of 
(ire swept away everything to the water front, and destroyed nearby shipping. In this fire several historical old vessels that 
were used along the water front tor business, storage and hotel purposes, on account of the high rents, were destroyed. Among 
them were the ships Apollo. General Harrison and Xiantic: the last named lay at the northwest corner of Clay and Sansome 
streets, where the Xiantic Hotel was later erected. 




RESPONSIBILITY 

From the quarry 
where the rough gran- 
ite is hewn, through 
the processes of drill- 
ing, cutting, sawing, 
carving and polishing, 
to the final assembly 
and fabrication into 
the Memorial, one 
organization demon- 
strates by consistent 
success the value of 
this single responsi- 
bility for design, man- 
ufacture and installa- 
tion. 

One standard, there- 
fore, governs the de- 
sign and manufacture 
of the materials as 
well as the engineer- 
ing and construction 
service. 

Booklet "DN" on 

Memorials sent on 

request 



Raymond Granite Company, Inc. 

CONTRACTORS 

GRANITE — STONE — BUILDING — MEMORIAL 

3 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco 1350 Palmetto Street, Los Angeles 



£>nn Jranrianr dtjnmtrte 

Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 

A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



Best Equipped and Most MODERN 
GARAGE West of Chicago 

The Century 



Two Blocks from Union Square 

675 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Between Taylor and Jones 



Independent Buyers' League 

furnishes its MEMBERS with 
ANYTHING sold at whole- 
sale at wholesale prices. 
Be a Member 

Independent Buyers' League 

833 Market St.. Room 902 

Phones Douglas 1203-1204 



Eyes 

Bother 

l'ou? 



Guaranteed 

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VOL. CI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF,, SATURDAY, JULY 15, 1922 



No. 2 



THE SAN' FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Eusli and Montgomery Streets, 
Han Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. SG.00 ; Canada, one year. $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— The Harding Administration rises, or falls, on its firm handling 
of the railroad shopmen's revolt against the Government and the 
people. 

— The American Republic is sick almost unto death of the cod- 
dling of criminals, in which list is included those who use labor for 
their selfish ends. 

— C. C. Moore is an ideal candidate for Senator from California. 

He is a distinguished native son and man of affairs, who has proved 

his worth and who comes of an old family, large and respected. 
if. if, if. 

— The German mark (worth 24 cents in pre-war days) has 
shrunk until one can buy 550 of them for one American dollar. 
But still a nine-cent German pocket knife retails for $5 in Chicago 
department stores. 

— Strike leaders wiring to Governor Stephens that Japs were be- 
ing used to replace railroad mechanics in the shops failed to state 
whether the Oriental were potato diggers or window washers sud- 
denly vested with mechanical skill. 

* * * 

— Only about three weeks remain lo register for the primary elec- 
tion August 29, when some of the statesmen responsible for the 
robbery of the taxpayers, by upkeep of a political machine, will 
be seeking to prolong their costly methods of government. 

* * * 

— When this abortive railroad strike is over the people of the 
United States should begin to move for the consolidation of the 
cabinet office of Labor Secretary with some other department as the 
principal use of the office is to make trouble between labor and 

capital. 

* * * 

Why do San Francisco newspapers invest De Valera with a 
tin halo as "A Noble Patriot," who is setting on fire the spirit of 
liberty in unhappy Ireland? He may mean well, but he is really 
an enemy to Ireland and no special advantage to any other section 

of the world. 

* * * 

It should not surprise anybody that the candidacy of C. C. 
Moore against Senator Johnson has been hailed with delight by 
good citizens of California. Some change is needed to relieve the 
taxpayers of the unbearable load imposed on them by the Johnson 
political machine. 



— The former teller of the Hellman bank in Los Angeles, who 
stole $22,000, has been sentenced to from one to ten years. From 
ten years to life would be a better reward for his rascality. 

— That Germany will weather the storm she is now passing 
through, is the prediction of former Ambassador Gerrard. The really 
important question is whether Europe will weather it, and ever pay 
back those eleven billions she owes to Uncle Sam. 

— Judging by the rumpus democracies all over the earth are 
kicking up, the doubt is permissible whether it was worth while 
for Woodrow Wilson to start the move to make the world safe for 
democracy. 

— The head of the Democratic fight in the U. S. Senate against 
the Federal Reserve is Heflin of Alabama. He was shown up by 
Senator Carter Glass of Virginia to be a twenty-four carat boob on 
banking. Now he is trying to square himself with his constituents 
who are laughing at him. 

— Governor Stephens' gentle message to invertebrate county 
sheriffs, telling them they were expected to "handle the situation" 
if violence occurred in the railroad strike, suggests the executive 
handling of the Illinois coal strike, which developed into a savagei 
massacre of non-union miners at Herrin. 

The worst feature of the abortive railroad strike is the anxiety 
of certain "Presidential Possibilities" in various parts of the coun- 
try to fan the flames of disorder and embarrass the Washington Ad- 
ministration. Politicians may call that kind of disloyalty statesman- 
ship, but a better name would be downright anarchy. 

* * * 

— Thanks to the American Plan, San Francisco's industrial pay- 
roll has increased ten million dollars in two years, according to re- 
liable figures issued by the Chamber of Commerce. A few years 
more of the union closed shop and there would be no payroll of 
any kind, except for walking delegates holding City Hall jobs. 

* * * 

— Why the San Francisco newspapers devote such an excessive 
amount of space to sports that do not interest over 15 per cent of 
the people is one of the inscrutable mysteries. Professional athletes 
contribute absolutely nothing to the direct advertising receipts and 
only help to supply meal tickets for a lot of bums and fat livings 

for amusement fakirs. 

* * * 

— Organized labor has forgotten that within a hundred years 
two or more workingmen who conspired to strike and delay trade 
were thrown into jail. It is insane to risk all the advantages labor 
has gained in two lives by arousing public bitterness by such crimes 
as the massacre of non-union miners in Illinois and the railroad 
strike against the U. S. Government. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 15, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




In commenting on the atrocity of the 
The Stain Must Be Expunged union massacre of coal miners in 
Illinois, the Spectator of Portland, 
Oregon, points out that, "no union leader or union sympathizer has 
had one word of condemnation for the unparalleled crime." Without 
exception, the union leaders place the entire responsibility upon the 
owners who attempted to operate their property in a perfectly legal 
way and the men who were willing to work at their usual occupation 
without iirst asking the permission of the miners' union. "For doing 
this," remarks the Spectator, "the workers were slaughtered like so 
many sheep after they had surrendered, while the wives and children 
of the butchers shouted their approval, and laughed at the sufferings 
of dying men." 

A feature of the massacre not generally understood by the public 
is made clear by the Spectator. The murdered men were working in 
what is known as a "strip" mine, where union miners had never 
worked, and never would work. The method of recovering coal is to 
strip it entirely by steam shovels, and has no connection with under- 
ground coal mining. "There was no question of taking the jobs 
of union men on strike," says the Spectator. "No doubt the objec- 
tion was that the mine was supplying coal at a time when the miners' 
union was desirous that the public should get no coal, so that the 
resultant misery would cause the operators to grant the strikers their 
demands. 

The real culprit was Lewis, head of the mine workers' union, who 
telegraphed in response to an inquiry from the local leaders of Her- 
rin that the Steam Shovelmen's Union was an "outlaw," whatever 
that may mean, and its members ordinary "strike breakers." The 
Spectator says Leader Lewis might as well have added, "Show them 
no mercy." This is a fine state of affairs in a country ostensibly 
free and civilized. 

Will there be no punishment for the perpetrators of this union 
atrocity? Will the cowardly and inefficient State authorities be al- 
lowed to condone the atrocity which is a stain on all America? Will 
it be taken as justification for the negligence of the Governor of 
Illinois, that he was too busy trying to keep out of jail on a charge 
of malfeasance in the handling of public money? 

Unfortunately, the prospects are that the criminals in this Illinois 
massacre will never be punished as they deserve, which would be by 
an application of the scriptural law "an eye for an eye and a tooth 
for a tooth." 

"But in a modified way, the guilty union can be made to pay 
money for a crime against mankind, and against the nation. Under 
the recent decision of the United States Supreme Court, that unions 
though unincorporated can be made liable for damages, the Miners' 
International Union can be attacked to pay damages to the de- 
pendents of the massacred men. If anything be left in treasury 
funds and property to the union culprits, it can be claimed by the 
owners of the damaged mine. 

It is impossible to believe that the American people will permit the 
stain on their civilization to remain unexpunged. 



For the fiscal year ending June 
Time for Republicans to Be Loyal 30, 1921, the total expenditures 

of the Government were $5,538,- 
040,689.30. For the fiscal year ending June 20, 1922, the total ex- 
penditures were $3,92.373,030, or a saving of $1,615,668,659.30. 
That means there has been a saving of $400,000,000 as compared 
with the first year of President Harding's administration, and a sav- 
ing, approximately, of two billions as compared with the last year of 
the Wilson administration. 

Two billions of a saving is something to be grateful for, even in 



these days of fabulous figures that deal with money in mountainous 
aggregations. Certainly there can be no question that the Harding 
administration is placing the Government on a sound financial basis, 
instead of threatening national ruin. It is a time for Republicans to 
be loyal to their party and not disposed to pull down its pillars by 
voting for avowed enemies of Republican policies. 



In New York where politics is 
The American Tiberius Gracchus a larger game and somewhat 

better understood than here, they 
have concluded that Hearst plans to elect himself President by a 
third party of radicals, or failing in that, to land Senator Hiram 
Johnson in the White House and be the power behind the throne. 
He is now behind Mayor John F. Hylan of New York, who selected 
Senator Hiram Johnson to try the New York subway suit and gave 
him a nice fat fee of $25,000. 

Publisher Hearst inherited twenty millions and a million acres 
of Mexican land, but these are trifles to him, compared with the 
joy of wielding the radical sceptre over the United States — another 
Lenine. 

He inherited political ambition. His excellent father. Senator 
George Hearst, bought the Examiner, then a moribund evening sheet, 
to make himself Governor of California. He failed, but became 
United States Senator. He was told that his political newspaper 
venture would cost about fifty thousand dollars. Its cost was nearer 
to a million. But George Hearst was of the material the California 
pioneers were made. He never batted an eyelash, but continued 
to write out the checks for his expensive political toy. Then he 
turned over the losing property to his ambitious son from Harvard, 
and the boy transformed the journalistic flivver into a six-cylinder 
speedster. In a month he was crowding all competitors. 

Men are like racehorses. To judge how far they will go one 
must know how they are bred. Hearst had a wonderfully game 
father and a mother whose unostentatious benevolences made her 
idolized. He is unique himself, devoting a great fortune to what 
seems to him splendid idealism, but which conservative, thought- 
ful citizens regard as dangerous evolution of our form of govern- 
ment, destined to wreck it on the turbulent reefs of radical democ- 
racy. He is rapidly nearing the crisis of his political hysteria. He 
is as mad for public office as was Lucius Cataline, born of a noble 
family, who conspired to seize ancient Rome ; or Tiberius Gracchus, 
also well born, who tried to set the Roman mob on the Senators, 
but got cracked on the head with a broken bench and was flung into 
the Tiber. History repeats itself. Not that we wish Publisher Hearst 
cracked on the nut. We only desire that he shall not make nuts 
of all of us to please his wild ambition. 

Hearst is a very clever fellow. He believes that a radical third 
party, drawing from Republicans and Democrats, can elect the 
President in 1924. That is why he is establishing new papers in 
various strategic points. Money is no bar to him. He exhibits in 
the first column of his Sunday supplements the portrait and proofs 
of the intellectual vacuity of that distinguished Southern statesman 
and saphead, Josephus Daniels. On the seventh column he displays 
the picture and broadcasts the weary whine of the decrepit under- 
dog, Eugene Debs. Josephus is the link that binds the Solid South 
even with its eyes glued on the Washington pie counter and its 
mouth wide open. Eugene is the appeal to the "submerged tenth," 
hopeless, yet always hopeful — of an American Soviet and the "sub- 
merged" fraction becoming the ruling majority. 

Between Josephus Daniels and old man Debs, the ambitious 
publisher presents on the fourth column of his Sunday supplements 
the portrait and feminine patter of some popular woman, preferably 



July 15. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



a novelist. But right there Mr. Hearst slips a cog as the women 
of the nation are against him. They dislike his methods. Labor 
is suspicious of him, as he secretly ran his presses in San Francisco 
for years with non-union hands, while ostensibly in accord with 
the doctrines of Gompers. If Mr. Hearst, in spite of all the enemies 
he has raised, can reach the White House, it will be a miracle. 
His election as Governor of New York, however, would put him right 
in line. 

If beaten for the governorship of New York, Hearst will support 
Hiram Johnson as the flag bearer of a radical third party, but he 
can only win him the distinction of having twice split the party 
to which he ostensibly belongs. If Senator Johnson desires to retire 
from public life on that record, all he has to do is to follow his 
present course. 



The railroad strike has interferred with many 
Unify the Car Systems lines of business, but it cannot continue long 
for the unions cannot fight the United States 
Government. In England the railroad and mine strikes were com- 
plete fizzles. 

When the present abortive railroad strike is ended our Super- 
visors in San Francisco must take up with fresh energy the propo- 
sition to unify the street railroad systems, by purchase of the Mar- 
ket Street Railway Company's lines out of their earnings. 

Owing to the lack of harmonious operation of our street railroads 
the development of the city is uneven. While Richmond booms, 
Sunset retrogrades and the growth of homes is retarded. The rent 
profiteers profit by the conditions. We cannot obtain a better solu- 
tion of the problem than the purchase of the private lines out of 
their earnings, and the unification of the private and the municipal 
systems. Let the Supervisors bestir themselves for the betterment of 
the city. 



Attempts to wreck trains and interference 
Strong Arm, Weak Spine with the transit of the millions of perish- 
able fruit freight, call for the most vigor- 
ous measures by the Governor, but he seems to be content to wire 
placid reminders to wobbly sheriffs and constables that it is highly 
desirable the laws shall be obeyed. 

Governor Stephens has a powerful arm but a weak spine. He 
can shovel out the money of the taxpayers to machine politicians 
like a husky coal passer working under high pressure, but his back- 
bone sags like an old picket fence when he is called to express 
himself on any public question excepting prohibition. 



It is hard to understand how any Republican 
Anti-Lynching Law Senator could vote against the anti-lynching 
bill, which has just been reported on favorably 
by the Senate Judiciary Committee, of which Senator Sam Short- 
ridge of California is a member. Americanism demands that some 
action be taken to stop the savage crime of lynching, which has 
shocked the civilized world, and which in the past two years has 
been more frequent than ever. In twenty-five years the lynchings 
by American mobs have exceeded the number of executions by 
order of lawful American courts of justice. 

The fact was proved in the recent debates on the anti-lynching 
bill in the House of Representatives, by which body it was passed, 
notwithstanding the solid opposition of the South. 

It is an arraignment of the United States before the world. Many 
of the victims of lynching were negroes, but many also were white 
people. Several women suffered the vengeance of infuriated mobs. 
Worst of all, some women were burned at the stake. 

Of course it is easy to understand and sympathize with the frenzy 
of a white mob wreaking its fury on negro ravishers of white women. 



but the debate in the House of Representatives showed that the 
greater number of lynchings were for entirely different offenses. 
Race hatred and labor troubles contributed to the record of lawless 
savagery, and continue to contribute, as witness the barbarous mas- 
sacre of coal miners in Illinois the other day. Weak and corrupt 
administration of the law by State courts is largely responsible for 
the mob spirit; but the courts cannot be made better and justice 
assured to all by allowing mobs to burn people alive and massacre 
strikebreakers. 

The anti-lynching law is the first step in the right direction. In 
principle it affirms the legal fact that people who undertake to 
execute mob justice are themselves criminals and must be punished. 
The county where a lynching takes place is to be punished by in- 
fliction of a heavy fine, as in nearly every case the local sheriff 
and other officials remain purposely inactive. 

Senator Sam Shortridge deserves credit for supporting this pro- 
posed law to curb savage mob outbreaks. The only Republican 
on the judiciary committee who voted against reporting the bill 
unfavorably was Senator Borah, who is one of the enemies of Presi- 
dent Harding's policies, and who expressed the opinion the other 
day that the coal operators in Illinois were most responsible for 
the appalling massacre of non-union miners. 



It is evident to the world that Gov- 
The Governor's Difficult Task ernor Stephens' administration does 

not intend to apply to striking rail- 
road shopmen in California the Draconic method of law enforce- 
ment which caused the ancient Greeks to say, "The laws of Draco 
are written in blood." Whether our State administration would call 
out the troops if the striking representatives of organized labor set 
the torch to a dozen fresh fruit trains, or massacred the hands en- 
gaged in iceing the freight, or the non-striking mechanics working 
in the railroad shops is a matter of speculation. We live in queer 
days in this Republic of American "liberty." 

Governor Stephens' extreme tenderness toward organized labor 
is due to the fact that labor is expected to be a great aid in Sena- 
tor Johnson's campaign this year, and our State gubernatorial regime 
is the hub of the great machine, which the eloquent native son has 
built up, and which costs the taxpayers three hundred per cent more 
than before we began to groom "favorite sons" for the Presidency 
of the United States. 

The Federal patronage in California is largely in the hands of 
organized labor. It controls the mint, the Internal Revenue Depart- 
ment, the surveyorship of the port, and other strategic political 
strongholds. As the "Progressive who never demobilized," Sena- 
tor Johnson may be one of the most prominent Presidential as- 
pirants of the campaign of 1924, of which the present Senatorial 
fight in California and other Republican States is a curtain raiser. 
Conditions are highly encouraging to Progressive aspirants who are 
out of harmony with the Harding administration and the entire 
"Old Guard" Republicans. 

It requires no deep political intuition to descern how useful would 
be the votes of organized labor in the struggle for the Presidency 
two years hence. One can readily understand how devoutedly Gov- 
ernor Stephens must wish there had not been thrust upon him the 
delicate and dangerous task of handling unruly railroad strikers 
with velvet gloves while pretending to execute the laws with a hand 
of steel. 



— Let us suppose that the Irish Free State puts De Valera on 
trial for sedition, and gives him about seven years in Dublin jail, 
for hi? pranks to break up the peace and prosperity of his native 
land, who will sign all the new bond issues of the Irish Republic to 
be placed on sale in America by industrious patriots. How about 
that. Andy Gallagher? 




SSSSSESSgSS >• .WS.S1 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 15, 1922 



irmein 



Oiuiit 



The Defeat of Senator McCumber in North Dakota Achieved by Farmers in Autos 

asHsiHglbBiaisiiaiisiiM 

BY HARVEY BROUGHAM 




THE reasons for the defeat of Senator McCumber for nomina- 
tion in the North Dakota senatorial primary are becoming more 
generally understood. He has been many years in our National 
Legislature and is regarded as one of the stalwarts of the "Old 
Guard." But elections in the United States are being decided 
more and more each year by economic, and not by political, issues. 
The reason is that the country's problems are economic and not 
political. 

There are 75,000 farms in North Dakota. The State stands sec- 
ond only to Texas in the number of farms of more than 500 acres. 
Eleven thousand North Dakota farmers are natives of Norway; 8500 
are natives of Russia or Finland. Many of the others are from 
Sweden, Denmark or Canada. North Dakota, with 850,000 horses, 
400,000 sheep and 1,500,000 cattle, does not excel in hogs and 
corn like States further South. Its staple is wheat. Its most inter- 
esting public questions relate to farm profits, railroad rates, milling, 
elevator charges and bankers' loans. The State is practically desti- 
tute of manufactures. 

What Kansas was in politics a generation ago North Dakota is 
today. It is the nusery of political eccentricities. Fads of all sorts 
flourish — isms, half-baked theories, frills and day dreams. It has 
200,000 voters and 36,000 telephones and the politicians, pro- 
fessional and amateur, keep them all busy. 

Senator Porter J. McCumber, whom this constituency has turned 
down in favor of ex-Governor Lynn Frazier, candidate of the Non- 
partisan League of Farmers, once ousted from office by recall, was 
born in Illinois in a small town called Crete, and was educated at 
the law department of the University of Michigan, from which he 
was graduated in 1880. He went to North Dakota in 1881 and 
began the practice of law in 1 882. He was a member of the Ter- 
ritorial Legislature and was elected State's Attorney of Richland 
County two years later and first a Senator in 1899. By reason of 
his long service under the "rule of seniority" in the Senate he has 
attained his present prominence among the Republicans as chair- 
man of the Finance Committee of the Senate. He is particular in 
his dress, but his speech is slow and he lacks magnetism. By the 
strange anomalies of politics he is the chosen champion of the Repub- 
lican tariff, though representing the State with the fewest manufac- 
tures and being by profession a lawyer in a small town with a wagon 
factory, a creamery and blacksmith shop. 

He is the spokesman of those ex-service men who are demanding 
a "bonus." At the close of the war there were 29.&03 American 
soldiers and sailors recruited from North Dakota. His defeat for 
renomination to the Senate is a blow to the "bonus" advocates. 

North Dakota is a producing, non-improving and generally non- 
consuming State. The farmers raise wheat, oats, cattle and horses; 
their "money-crop" is wheat. As often happens in a purely agri- 
cultural State, the machinery for transportation and for marketing 
is in the hands of the investors in other States. They direct the 
railways, they control the grain elevators, they manage the mills 
and, generally speaking, they fix the prices. 

The conditions in North Dakota have been considered favorable 
for success by the National Non-Partisan League of Farmers, and 
they have long been concentrating their efforts to capture its admin- 
istration. They elected Lynn J. Frazier Governor; later they re- 
elected him; still later they sent Edward F. Ladd to the United 
States Senate, and later, they "recalled" Governor Frazier and he 



was removed from office by a referendum. Now they have ousted 
Senator McCumber and nominated in his place the once-repudiated 
Governor. 

This success of the Non-Partisan League is regarded by thought- 
ful citizens as bad for North Dakota. The Fargo Forum, an im- 
portant newspaper, declares that the restoration of the Non-Par- 
tisan League administration would be unfortunate, both politically 
and economically, for it would make a renewal of the fight that 
has been waged for five years and it would restore the economic 
and financial conditions that resulted in 80-cent hail warrants and 
unsaleable bonds. Such is the view of intelligent observers gener- 
ally, whether Republicans or Democrats. 

The Non-Partisan League owes its success, primarily, to the 
motor car. Most Northwestern farmers live far away from the 
railways; traveling rates are high; passenger trains are few. To 
make a "campaign" in the olden days it was necessary to ask the 
farmers to come together into a town. They could not be reached 
otherwise. The impracticable radicals would come; the conserva- 
tive farmers would stay away. "City chaps," as they are called 
locally, would attend in good numbers and then, inevitably, either 
the new party would founder on the rocks of wild incendiary 
theories or would be "sold out" to one or other of the old parties. 

When autos became common in North Dakota political election- 




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AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



eering was transformed. A dozen organizations could start at dif- 
ferent points and in a few weeks would cover the entire State, en- 
rolling members, collecting dues, outlining the policies of the league 
and the advantages to accrue to farmers from joining it. 

Large cities are not favorable to farmers' co-operative leagues 
which have, primarily, for their purpose higher prices for food and 
lower wages for work. North Dakota has no large cities. Hence the 
farmers' organization was, and is, strong there. It is so in North 
Dakota; it is so in South Dakota; it is so in Wisconsin, which has 
only Milwaukee as "enemy country," and it is so in Minnesota out- 
side of St. Paul and Minneapolis. You do not hear of any formid- 
able political organization on agricultural lines in Illinois with 230,- 
000 farmers, in Ohio with 250,000, in New York with 185,000, in 
Michigan with 190,00, or in Missouri with 250,000. The reasons: 
Chicago, Cleveland and Columbus, New York, Detroit, St. Louis 
and Kansas City. 

Democrats are not, as a general thing, very numerous in North 
Dakota, but when, as in 1916, there is a defection of the strong 
Scandinavian vote from the Republicans, anything may happen, 
as it did that year, when Mr. Wilson carried the State. That was, 
however, before the entrance of the United States into the European 
war and before the organization of the Non-Partisan League, which 
drew into its fold many Democrats. 

Ex-Governor Lynn Frazier is an energetic campaigner and with 
the support of the farmers of the Non-Partisan League, is likely to 
go to the Senate. The fact that he was recalled as Governor and 
ousted makes little difference in North Dakota. 

Against the ex-Governor it is urged that if elected to the Senate 
he will be the representative of the Non-Partisan League and not 
the Republican Party. It was under his administration that trust 
funds of the State from grants made by the Federal Government 
for its school system were dissipated. 

But the dominant idea of the farmers of the Non-Partisan League 
is that they must get more for their produce. North Dakota has 
more than a million head of cattle. A pair of shoes made from a 
North Dakota hide sell for $10 in New York. The Dakota farmer 
gets $1.50 and wants to get $5, if he can. But can he? The stock- 
yards now get $1.50 out of the $IO-pair of shoes in New York. The 
manufacturer gets $1.85; the manufacturer's overhead, $1.10; the 
retailer $1.50; the retailer's overhead, $1.30; the railroads 25 
cents; the Government tax, 10 cents. The percentages are: Farmer 
36, stockyards 25, manufacturer 31, retailer 33, bank 5. 

Unfortunately, in the necessary complications of trade and finance 
the farmer can hardly expect to "hog it all." But he does. 






EQUAL RIGHTS WITH SPECIAL PRIVILEGES 

The Woman's Party has issued a pamphlet to prove, mainly by 
testimonials, the justice and excellence in practice of the Woman's 
Rights Law adopted last summer in Wisconsin. A reprint of the law 
is included and the first paragraph of its first section reads: 

"Women shall have the same rights and privileges under the law 
as men in the exercise of suffrage, freedom of contract, choice of 
residence for voting purpose, jury service, holding office, holding 
and conveying property, care and custody of children and in all 
other respects." 

The second section, however, introduces a modification in the 
method of jury selection: 

"Any woman drawn to serve as a juror, upon her request to the 
presiding judge or magistrate before the commencement of the trial 
or hearing, shall be excused from the panel or venire." 

In so far as jury service is a privilege, it will be noted, the women 
of Wisconsin have it. In so far as it is a duty they will have none 
of it. Another paragraph makes general the same reservation by 
directing all blanches of the State Government to "construe the 
Statutes where the masculine gender is used to include the feminine 

gender unless such construction will deny the Females the 

on and privileges they now enjoy for the general welfare." 
Wisconsin has discovered that women cannot assume equal rights 



In the 
Summer 



The shirt and the cravat play the 
most important parts in man's attire 



•* « < 



D. C. Heger 

MAKER OF EXCLUSIVE SHIRTS 

NECKWEAR - UNDERWEAR - PAJAMAS - ROBES 



San Francisco 
11 6-1 IS Kearny Street 




Los Angeles 

407 W. Seventh Street 



and duties as citizens without being granted special privileges. It 
follows that the agitation for equal rights is agitation for special 
privileges under the law. — N. Y. World. 



— Register Zemansky is predicting how many votes will be cast 
at the primary election August 29. It would be much more inter- 
esting if he would tell the taxpayers how they could get ten millions 
cut off the annual expense of San Francisco, which has increased 
from seven millions to twenty-five under the present administration. 

*>•:••:••;••:••:• •:•♦•!••{'♦****♦•:••:••:••:••:":••:<•:••:••:• •:••:••:••:••:• •:••:•♦•:••:••:• •:••:••:••:••:• •:••:••:••:• 

* * 

| Casa Del Rey I 



SANTA CRUZ 



CALIFORNIA 



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The ^Million 'Dollar Fireproof Hotel 



THE ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm 
beach bathing; dancing; good music; artistic, home-like 
spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful 
playgrounds; sanitary warm bathing pool; swimming 
instructors; saddle ponies for children. Special kitchen- 
ette in hotel proper where maid can prepare food for 
young children. 

Complete highways, through the most beautiful sec- 
tion of California. I Only SO miles.) The Southern Pa- 
cific offers unusually low rates from all California points: 
the warmest and most accessible beach out of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also 
under the same management as Casa Del Rey. 

Correspondence about rates for families with maids 
and children solicited. Special rates by the week or for 
extended stays of a month or two. Address: 



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SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 

I'll. ph.- lion 



I CASA DEL REY : 

% MORRIS 4 WARNER, Proprietors. PbOBe 600 t 

♦ # 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ < l<»r*»»»»>t »»♦♦»♦•>♦ 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 15, 1922 




'Ooe&atHillphf the dent ttv.tetlja 



— The sane celebration of the Fourth of July has set people 
thinking. The fire alarm was unheard on the day when usually it 
clanged from morning till moonlight. Why should not fires become 
rare events instead of a daily terror? For fires are terrible. No 
one can tel! the extent of their injury. 

— Many of the fires these days are of incendiary origin. So say the 
insurance people, who should know. Many people desire to square 
their accounts by setting fire to their buildings. All that makes it 
harder on the honest citizen, who would rather face the humiliation 
of bankruptcy than put a match to his goods, and perhaps burn 
down an entire block. Insurance is a costly provision to the honest 
merchant, who has no secret plan to increase his capital by in- 
cendiarism. 

— Not so many years ago they hung all incendiaries. In their 
rough but effective way the old-timers figured that the world was 
better off rid of people who set fire to their houses, without a 
thought of the possible effect on their neighbors. Our crude great- 
grandfathers were also curt and forceful in their dealings with bur- 
glars and highwaymen who pursue their calling ready to take the 
lives of their victims. They hanged them almost as soon as they 
could lay hands on them. For murder the only possible delay in 
the hanging was to make sure the right man had the rope around 
his neck. 

— Evidently we made a lamentable mistake in discarding our 
grandfathers' methods of dealing with incendiaries, burglars, ban- 
dits and outright murderers. Our conversion of them into ornaments 
of society by surgical operations on their brain and by giving them 
university extension courses and parole whenever they are ready to 
accept it is not working as well as many expected. For the one in- 
cendiary, burglar, bandit or outright murder walking around un- 
punished and unafraid in our grandfathers' days, we now have ten 
thousand. 

— Dr. John Grier Hibben, president of Princeton University, says 
optimistically, "the best cure for prevalence of crime is the teach- 
ing of reverence for the law, not only in the colleges, but every- 
where. If the people are taught to revere the law they will obey it." 
The good doctor should get down to cold facts and abandon ideal- 
istic flummery. How are the people to be taught to "revere" laws 
made by legislatures composed of express wagon drivers and soforth, 
and by a Congress composed of fourth-rate lawyers, who could not 
scratch out a livelihood at home. And if we had wise laws we 
have not the State courts to administer them. What the nation 
needs, dear doctor, is to take State judges out of rotten politics 
and make our courts efficient and respected. 

— The statement of Thomas Lee Woolwine, Democratic candi- 
date for Governor, that 75 per cent of the attorneys defending crim- 
inals at the bar should be in the penitentiary rather gratifies us. 
We thought the correct percentage was 98, and certainly not under 
95. 

— But whether 75 per cent or 98 per cent of the criminal lawyers 
of the State should be in prison, there can be no question that Dis- 
trict Attorney Brady's treatment of Wilkens, whose wife was the 
victim of an auto robbery, is "an outrage to decent citizenship." 
That is how the treatment was described the other night by Grand 



Juror McNevin. The words are recorded by the Chronicle, which 
is far from being a sensational or unreliable newspaper. In the 
South they burn niggers at the stake and the world shudders. What 
will the world think of San Francisco where a man whose wife 
was murdered on the highway before her children, has been treated 
with as little consideration as a burglar trying to elude justice. The 
inhumanity of the treatment merit all that Grand Juror McNevin 
has said of it. 

— District Attorney Brady was elected by the unions as part of 
the activity to free Tom Mooney, the dynamiter, but the American 
people have sickened of union efforts in aid of desperate disturbers. 
Mr. Brady's conduct of the Fatty Arbuckle case alienated all the 
decent citizens of San Francisco. They have not changed their opin- 
ions of the district attorney's office by the recent action in restor- 
ing a burglar to duty in the Fire Department. The treatment of 
Wilkens, the man, puts the final touch to the picture. 

In olden days San Francisco elected its chief of police and the 
administration was about as uninspiring as the district attorney's of- 
fice under an official elected by the unions. Let's wipe the district 
attorney off the list of elective officials. He should be an appointed 
official under an appointed judiciary. 

— On cold reflection, the suspicion arises that the annual com- 
bustion of fireworks and patriotism in the United States has been 
more a demonstration of practical commercialism than an expres- 
sion of ideal sentiment. Fireworks cost money. A great amount of 
money was spent on them by the nation of about a hundred mil- 
lions of men, women and children jubilating by burning them up 
on one day in the year. Could it be that because fireworks were 
bought for little in China, and sold at a large profit in America to 
demonstrative patriots, that insane celebration of the Fourth was 
prolonged so many years, notwithstanding the numbers of people 
blinded and maimed? Money is the root of all evil. 



Sacramento 

River 

Canyon 

Resorts on the Shasta Route 

EXCURSION FARES 
y< TTTH >5»v From San Francisco Until Sept. 30 

/0/^> " »>^P\ 16-Day s,.,.s„„ 

/W/Qff^VlA Ticket Tlokel 

I I LINES II Delta $11.25 $13.50 

\ \ JrMk / I Lamoine n -25 13.50 

V^<£|a/C// Castella 11.75 14.25 

XQj_^X Castle Crag 12.00 14.50 

Dunsmuir 12.25 14.75 

Shasta Retreat 12.25 14.75 

Ask for Shasta Springg 12 25 14 75 

Outing Resorts' SUson 12J5 152 5 

bolder 15-Day Tickets on gale Friday and Satur- 

day Bond for return within 16 days. 
Season Tickets on Hale daily pood for re- 
turn within three months, but not later 

than Oct. 31 ( and carry Htoi>over priv- 
ileges. 

Trains leave Sim Franelsen, Ferry Sta- 
tion: 9:20 A. M. (does not stop at 
Castle ('ran or Shustn Retreat ) and 
8:20 P. M. 

Our Agents Will Gladly Furnish You Further Information 

Southern Pacific Lines 

50 Post St Ferry Station Third St. Station 

Phone Sutter 4000 



July 15. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



MAH JONGG 

Just now business men and society maids and matrons, in fact 
everyone who enjoys an interesting game of chance, is fascinated 
by the Chinese game of Mali Jongg. Centuries upon centuries old 
it is, having been played during the time of Confucius and handed 
down through the Chinese generations like the wonderful silk robes, 
brass Buddhas, and other artistic and interesting antiques. 

The native Chinese have a natural hankering, as it were, for 
games of chance and have made our national game of poker al- 
most as universal in China as it is in the United States. 

But recently in Shanghai, the English city of the Orient, one 
Joseph Babcock, a Standard Oil representative in Tsinanfu, recog- 
nized the possibilities of the game of Mah Jongg. Heretofore the 
game could be played only by those who understood the Chinese 
language and the Chinese characters. Through his knowledge of 
the language, Babcock was able to translate the rules into English, 
making it at once both easy to learn and to play without the aid 
of an instructor. The game with a copyrighted set of rules made 
by Mr. Babcock, was brought over to America by an American 
firm. Now all America is agog with interest and those who might 
have shrugged their shoulders first are eagerly seeking Mah Jongg 
parlors. 

After half a dozen times handling the attractive ivory and bamboo 
dominoes, bridge enthusiasts forget their old love and remain deep 
in the intricacies of this new lure, forgetting time. 

Says the China Press of Shanghai: "Much of the popularity of 
the game may be ascribed to the beauty and attractiveness of the 
skillfully carved 'tiles," which number 136. The Chinese art crafts- 
man has, in the Mah Jongg 'tile,' made a thing of beauty, which 
it is a pleasure to handle in playing the game. It is really worth 
while to secure a set in which the attractiveness of the colored 
design carved on the ivory-white face is really an object of beauty 
and makes much of the pleasure in playing Mah Jongg. A set of 
Mah Jongg will last the player for years and it is wise to purchase 
a set that will add greatly to the pleasure of every game he plays." 

Mah Jongg is the fashionable fad of society at present. "It is 
really being done this season." What matter is the Mah Jongg 
teas keep dinner waiting as even the Mah Jongg games at the club 
keep breakfast waiting. The same old sauce, you know is good 
for both family executives and while dad works mother plays Mah 
Jongg, so while mother sleeps dad and the boys and girls play all 
the time. 



SHALL WE PAY OFF GERMANY'S WAR DEBT? 

In the debate in the Senate on the tariff bill Senator McCumber 
of North Dakota, replying to Senator Jones of New Mexico, shed 
considerable light on the complexities of price fixing by means of 
duties to fit the politics and commerce of our home market and that 
of Germany. 

"Let us take such a business as we have here in the pottery and 
chinaware industry in the United States," said McCumber. 

"Germany can manufactuie and sell at home, with a reasonable 
profit, a dinner set of 100 or 150 pieces, for $100. American manu- 
facturers can manufacture and sell practically the same set, at least 
of the same inherent value, for $400. Germany exports those to 
the United States, but the German Government says to the manu- 
facturer, 'You have got to put an export price on that article that 
will amount to 200 per cent, in addition, and sell that to the Ameri- 
can market for at least $300, plus the duty' — which we will say, 
at 30 per cent, would be $90 — 'and that will give you the profit 
you are making on selling it for $100 and $10 in addition to that, 
and then you will divide with the Government this $210 profit.' 

"The German Government wants the gold. She needs the money, 
and under the present situation I do not believe she is going to drive 
down the prices in the United States to such an extent that she will 
lose by it. But here is the situation we must face. We are making 
this bill, not for the year 1922, but maybe two, or four years, and 



possibly longer. Here, then, is a situation to meet. The Senator 
from New Mexico said there was no such condition, and that there- 
fore it was a waste of time to argue the matter upon any such hy- 
pothesis. Let us see about that. 

"Here is an article whose export invoice price is $908.36. The 
price at which it is sold in wholesale quantities at home was $218. 
The export price exceeds the home price by 316 per cent. Do you 
not see that the German merchant, if the Government will allow 
him, can reduce that 316 per cent and yet sell at the same profit 
at which he is selling today in the home market? 



HENRY FORD STILL WAITS 

Since Henry Ford "intimated privately" some time ago that 
he would run for President "if the people of the country desire 
him to do so" there has been no response audible without a micro- 
phone. One trouble may be that his sponsor, William T. Kronberg, 
said Mr. Ford "would refuse to spend any money to bring about 
his nomination or election." 

Mr. Ford will need a hammock and a pitcher of some innocent 
but cooling beverage; he has a long time to wait. Presidential 
nominations are made by national conventions; and delegates to 
these are instructed by primaries; and primaries are conducted by 
practical politicians, however popular in form. It was lately noted 
that a reformer candidate can spend perhaps a quarter as much in 
fighting the machine in Pennsylvania as an Old Guard candidate 
can spend in oiling the works in Michigan. No money, no dele- 
gates. 

Not that it is necessary for a candidate for President to spend 
his own money; it is generally considered good politics to nominate 
somebody who hasn't much money to spend. But somebody has 
to provide it. To be a favorite son of Michigan, Mr. Ford's State, 
would cost a pretty sum even at a fraction of the sumptuous New- 
berry scale. As for getting delegates from other States, they may 
be pledged in advance at a considerable cost or swung at an early 
morning conference at a convention city hotel. 

Mr. Kronberg is a leader in the "Henry Ford for President Club." 
If he had said in effect, "Mr. Ford has a barrel; and he's looking 
the other way," only the admirable concrete roads about Dearborn 
could prevent the raising of an instant dust-cloud from the feet of 
hastening pilgrims. But — "he would refuse to spend any money"? 
That is no way for a millionaire to talk Presidential politics — New 
York World. 



Classy Apartments 
For Sale, $36,000 

Rents $5,280 per annum 

6 APARTMENTS of 4 rooms each, 
hardwood floors, steam heat, wall 
beds; inviting lobby; building in fine 
condition, near Bush and Jones. 

Only $11,000 Cash 

required for these down town 
apartments 

ADDRESS 382 RUSS BUILDING 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 15, 1922 



ilg]iHai9g|glS!llii^ 

ot American Soviet «$■ ■ 

si a h 

The Massacre of Non-Union Workers in Illinois Viewed From Several Angles * 

gig^Bi^BSiigiaissiSjpjr^^ 

BY VINCENT L. STRONG 



THE blame for the inhuman massacre of non-union miners in 
Illinois is laid on the president of the American Federation of 
Labor and his oligarchy by John E. Edgerton, president of the 
National Association of Manufacturers. Gompers and his fellow 
leaders have indulged in continued denunciation of all legislatures 
and courts, and preached the doctrine that the lawful tribunals 
of law are not to be obeyed. Continually the president of the Fed- 
eration of Labor professes to be fighting to prevent control of organ- 
ized labor by "radicals." But nobody could be more radical than 
the men responsible for the slaughter of non-union coal miners at 
Herrin. What could be worse than all the atrocities perpetrated for 
thirty years, without a word of denunciation from the leaders of 
unionism? On the contrary, large sums have been raised by Gompers 
& Company in assessments on unions to defend the desperate dyna- 
miters who operated in many parts of the United States, including 
California. An enormous amount was raised to procure the freedom 
of Mooney, who is in prison for the blowing up of scores of inno- 
cent people, at a public procession in San Francisco. 

The American public is blind to what such protection of des- 
perate crime by organized labor means. It means that the nation 
is in the grip of lawless desperadoes, who have practically sub- 
stituted red-handed communism for orderly protection of life and 
property. It is the right of workers to strike, but it is a high crime 
against the Constitution and civilized humanity for strikers to picket 
the property of their former employers, intimidate workers who wish 
to take their places, and perhaps massacre the strikebreakers 
in cold blood. The toleration of such crimes by the lawful author- 
ities practically sanctions communism. It robs employers of their 
business, and makes the strikers the owners of it with tacit permis- 
sion to go further and dynamite the factories and murder the strike- 
breakers. All this under the guise of "protecting organized labor in 
its rights." There is no question of right involved. The question 
is how much longer will the American people tolerate such infamous 
wrongs and intolerable tyranny, enforced by a special privileged 
class of workers, led by politicians who never do a lick of honest 
work. Are we retrograding to the barbarism of the cavemen? It 
would seem so. Sam Gompers, the head of this lawless organization 
which obliterates the codes and makes an independent workman's 
life on a par with a sheep's, is one of the most powerful men in 
Washington — if not the most powerful. Congressmen kowtow to 
him like coolies before a Chinese emperor. 

Mr. Edgerton, head of the National Association of Manufacturers, 
commenting on the recent massacre of non-union coal miners in 
Illinois, declares that organized labor "has practically set up a 
Soviet in the United States. There can be no support," Mr. Edger- 
ton said, "of the theory that any group of workers possesses vested 
rights to any jobs, and that others who take those jobs shall be 
condemned and punished as we punish only murderers or deserters 
from the army. If men do not want to work themselves they have 
no right to refuse others the right to work at terms and under con- 
ditions acceptable to them." 

Referring to the responsibility of Gompers and his oligarchy for 
the Illinois massacre, Mr. Edgerton said: 

"These mis-leaders give to their fellows the opinion that labor 
is above the courts and law and order. Believing themselves above 
all law and order they proceed to make their own law and to en- 
force by bloodshed their own decisions that no one not carrying 



membership certificates in their own private societies can work. 

"Repudiations of violence by the president of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor and his cohorts are both insincere and nonsensical 
so long as they continue to instill in their followers the idea that 
they are above all laws and court decisions and cannot be held 
legally responsible for their actions. 

"We have set before us in this ever-disgraced town of Herrin, the 
practical results of Bolshevistic repudiation of law and order and 
decency even as it has been known in darkest Russia. It appears 
that the majority of the men murdered were killed after they had 
surrendered to the mob. Men were told to flee and the cowards 
shot them in the backs. The pirates of old made men walk the 
plank, but it makes the blood of all true Americans boil to think 
that in a great State of this nation wholesale private butchery can 
take place." 

The actions of the Illinois mob, Mr. Edgerton said, "were an 
expression of the union theory of force, which the closed shop 
means. 

"The efforts of the United Mine Workers have been to secure 
nation-wide control of the coal industry, by insisting that only union 
members shall be allowed to earn a living. The other unions which 
advocate this closed shop policy of monopoly and exclusion seek 
nation-wide control of their own industries and therefore support the 
efforts of the United Mine Workers. Will America tolerate such a 
policy?" 

Mr. Edgerton omitted to mention one feature of the union closed 
shop — the exclusion of apprentices — which is far-reaching and dis- 
astrous in its consequences. The lack of building trades mechanics, 
which is now causing a housing crisis and heartless profiteering in 
rents, is due to the exclusion of American apprentices for years 
back. American boys, finding the doors of union shops closed 
against them, have been driven into the army or navy, or forced 
into idleness conducive to criminal association. 

With the open shop, American Plan, in full acceptance and oper- 
ation any American boy could learn to be a plumber, carpenter or 
bricklayer. 

The inhuman massacre of non-union miners in Illinois may at 
last arouse the American public mind to the dangers of permitting 
a super-government of any kind to write its own laws of what it 
considers right or wrong. 



FINE MEN BUT INCOMPETENT 

Lenin recently indulged in some amazingly plain speaking. He 
explained the conceded failure of the Bolshevist experiment by the 
fact that it had not had at command competent business men. "If 
every responsible Communist working man," he said, "had under- 
stood clearly that we were not qualified to manage business enter- 
prices and that we must start out and learn from the beginning, we 
might have succeeded." By contrast he referred to what had been 
done under the capitalist system. The capitalist, it is true, was a 
monster; he robbed and oppressed; but he "actually supplied 
goods." In that matter, the Communist regime had been woefully 
deficient. That had been the great trouble, and was what had led 
to crisis after crisis under the Soviet policy. Lenin admitted that 
the people were pronouncing the verdict: "You are fine men and 
all that, but you cannot do what you set out to do in a, business 
way." Finest theorists but incompetent in practice. 



July 15. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



11 



gtSS)MalKS'SSiSSSSB3K¥¥S BQBBB 8 B g « ST STin? ST >< :: : : «l « » « „■ a ,: a a a a :■; a a a ui, a a a it ST. H a is ffa : 

| ▼ 1 Points for Property Owners 



Owning Your Home Made Difficult by Profiteers of Various Kinds and High Taxes 

agiBBBBHBSSBBSBEBHHBBSiBiHBBBBBaBBBBBBBBBHBBiRiBBBi 
BY MONTGOMERY SMITH 




THE NEWSPAPERS wish people to build their homes, which is 
most laudable. But to make the building and upkeep of homes 
an economic proposition, the honest citizen planning to become a 
respectable and responsible member of the community, must be 
shown that he will not be fleeced by high taxation and various kinds 
of profiteering. Unless the majority of our citizens plan to live 
in their own homes and raise families, the city cannot prosper. A 
nation in which the homebuilder has ceased to be an important fac- 
tor is in a bad way. One of the troubles with the republic of Ancient 
Rome was the decreasing number of citizens who owned their homes 
and had no permanent interest in the community. 

Now, when the newspapers are so earnest in their advise to hon- 
est citizens to get in and build homes, with carpenters getting $10 
a day, plasterers $14 a day, and plumbers indisposed to accept any 
wage, if they have to demean themselves by working with peopla 
who has not the permission of some walking delegate, incidently 
holding a municipal job in the City Hall, will the journalistic boosters 
please tell us how an honest heme planner is to finance his scheme? 

Building lots are to be had at very reasonable prices, and we 
will suppose the honest home planner has secured one out in Rich- 
mond, which has boomed by reason of the excellent car service. A 
modest family cannot get on with less than five rooms. Seven would 
be better. The old home builders in San Francisco did not con- 
sider anything less than a seven-room house, which could be erected 
for $500 per room. For seven rooms the approximate building cost 
and lot would be $4750. A house of the same size today, but much 
less substantially constructed, costs $1000 per room. That would 
be $7000 for the building and $2000 for the lot, or $9000 alto- 
gether. There are always extras in building. The home builder 
today, figuring on a seven-room house, must not expect to get much 
under $9500. Not only are wages at the peak, but materials of all 
kinds are at the top. 

A Discouraging Prospect 

How many young home builders can hopefully face a debt of 
$9500 to be paid in installments, with a first payment of $1500? 
That leaves $8000 at 7 per cent per annum, of $560 a year. In- 
surance on the biulding is instantly required by the bank or con- 
tractor, and insurance rates are high, as our city is 90 per cent 
wooden. Repairs will be light the first year, but after that far from 
light, owing to poor construction. Then comes the awful load 
of taxation— this year $3.45 per hundred. The rate used to be a 
dollar on the hundred before we got the habit of voting bonds for 
every purpose and fad. 

The honest home builder's day dream of a beautiful suburban 
house will suffer several jars before he begins to see it realized. 
But. however many pangs he and his good wife may suffer, it is 
far better for them to own their home than go on to the end paying 
rent. There generally is but one finish to that course. 

In former years when the tax rate was .i dollar on the hundred 
and an ordinary tenement of six or seven rooms could be tinted 
for about $20, it was g Favorite plan of thrifty homeseekers to 
erect two-flat buildings and rent one. In that way the rent problem 
was simplified. But between high taxes, insurance, excessive water 
charges, and other costs tenement ownership is a risky business. 
That is why there is a building crisis. The small capitalists are not 
building. 

Hie hi si discouragement thai a small investor experiences is the 
building laws. Every rule ol the board of works is made to enable 



the unions to squeeze the property owner. The plumbing trust is 
downright robbery. Sanitary precautions are of course necessary, 
but sanitation is not the purpose of the City Hall politicians, in 
league with the predatory unions and material trusts. 

An owner of flats can get plenty of tenants these days but not 
plenty of good tenants. The latter variety is rare. It is almost ruin 
to tenement property to lease it to families with children. Sad to 
relate, the average American family, in any circumstances, has a 
limited control of its olive branches. They treat a flat or apart- 
ment as if it were a barn. They hack the woodwork and write all 
over the white paint. They cause constant danger of fire and 
annoy adult tenants by constant running upstairs and down, and 
by playing in the streets. We build public playgrounds and retain 
salaried superintendents, but the side streets remain the favorite 
rendevous of the youngsters, and the police make little pretense of 
maintaining order. 

After an ill-managed San Francisco family has abused a flat, 
they may move out, owing the landlord several months rent. He 
has to tint and paint his tenement, as if it were a new place being 
made ready for occupancy. Common painters, fit only to daub 
fences, receive about $8.50 a day, and carpenters on the same ex- 
travagant scale. A four-room flat or apartment costs for tinting 
and touching up the woodwork about $15 a room. That would be 
very cheap. A real estate owner the other day paid $120 to put 
in order a cheap four-room flat, from which he had been forced 
to eject a disorderly working family. The father was employed in 
a factory. The slatternly mother sat in the window all day when 
not making home brew. This was not a family of newly arrived 
aliens, but native born Americans of the first generation. Their rent 
was $25 a month, so the unlucky landlord spent six months rent 
in making his badly used property habitable, for in addition to the 
painting and tinting, there were bills for broken glass, electric 
light fixtures, and window shades, making a total of $150. 

Not every working family, of course, is as bad as that dirty 
and destructive bunch. Many are good citizens, careful of the 
property they rent. But the number of undesirables is large. 
The Water Graft 

Another serious discouragement to owners of rented property is 
the water charge. It costs almost as much to buy water from the 
Spring Valley Company as to manufacture beer in pre-Volstead days. 
The system of charging by meter, which is permitted by Governor 
Stephens' Railroad Commission, is an abuse which makes the State 
Administration hosts of enemies. Not only are the unfortunate prop- 
erty owners charged for water to tenements by meter rates, but they 
are made to pay rent for the meters. There never was a more rep- 
rehensible and unjust exaction, yet not a single newspaper in San 
Francisco has had a word of condemnation for it. 

Metering the water to tenements must increase enormously the 
gross income of the Spring Valley Company. With the additional 
20 per cent on rates allowed it by Governor Stephens' Railroad 
Commission, it is as prosperous as a combination of bootleggers. 
We hear no more of any desire of the water company to sell out to 
the city. The income it enjoys is too easily obtained. 

Under the meter rate of charging for water a malicious or care- 
less tenant, by allowing a toilet to run at all hours, or a kitchen 
sink to continue leaking, could subject his landlord to heavy charges. 
The landlord must pay the bill and pay for the lease of the meter 
with which the waste water is measured. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 15, 1922 




Busy Cupid 

MISS MAUDE FAY and Captain Powers 
Symington, U. S. N., were married on 
Wednesday, July 12. The wedding took 
place at tne residence of Archbishop Ed- 
ward J. Hanna in the evening, with a re- 
ception at the old Fay home on Grove street 
afterward. Mrs. George Cameron and Mrs. 
Marshal] Dill, the latter a sister of the bride, 
were in the bridal party. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Symington, Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
Symington and their daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jack Symington and Mrs. Charles Syming- 
ton arrived Sunday evening in a party from 
the East to attend the wedding of their 
brother. Captain Symington, and Miss Fay. 
Luncheons 

— Mrs. Lawrence McCreery was hostess 
at the St. Francis at luncheon and had with 
her Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran, Mrs. Rennie 
P. Schwerin, Mrs. Robert Hays Smith, Miss 
Lawton Filer and Miss Anne Peters. 

— In compliment to Miss Henrietta Allen, 
daughter of Governor and Mrs. Allen of 
Kansas, Miss Rosamonde Lee gave a small 
luncheon at the Francesca Club Monday aft- 
ernoon. Miss Lee and Miss Allen were in 
the same class at Miss Spence's School in 
New York two years ago. 

— Miss Dorothy Meyer, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. H. L. E. Meyer Jr., entertained 
informally at luncheon at the Woman's Ath- 
letic Club Monday for Miss Marion Scott 
of White Plains, N. Y. 

— Miss James K. Armsby gave a luncheon 
party on Wednesday in honor of Mrs. A. 
Starr Keeler. Mrs. Keeler's recuperation to 
good health, after her invalidism of over 
two years, is the cause of considerable en- 
tertaining in her honor. 

— Mrs. James Ward Kenney was hostess 
at luncheon on Monday in the Fable Room 
of the Hotel St. Francis, having as her guests 




It is for you to say when you want 
to experience that thrill that comes 
only behind the wheel of a 

PEERLESS MOTOR 
CAR IN ACTION 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St 

Telephone Prospect 8800 



Mrs. Frederick W. Sharon, Miss Fanny 
Friedlander and Miss May Friedlander. 

— Complimenting Miss Maude Fay and her 
fiance. Captain Powers Symington, U. S. N., 
Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. Nion Tucker were 
hosts at a handsome al fresco luncheon party 
on the veranda of their home in Burlingame. 
Several tables accommodated the guests. 
Vivid-hued flowers with silken table covers 
to match the predominating color, made a 
bright background for the affair. The guests 
included also: Messrs and Mesdames Charles 
T. Crocker, George Cameron, Mauntford S. 
Wilson, Harry H. Scott and Walter G. Filer; 
Dr. and Mrs. Max Rothschild, Mrs. Welling- 
ton Morse, Mrs. Chauncey Pennoyer, Mrs. 
Henry Foster Dutton; also Messrs. Lorenzo 
Avenali, L M. Batson, Baldwin Wood. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marye assem- 
bled fifty guests at their country seat in 
Burlingame for a buffet luncheon Sunday. 
The Marye party was in compliment to Mrs. 
Frederick W. Sharon, who has been the in- 
centive for many of the recent notable af- 
fairs. 

Teas 

— Mrs. Temple Bridgman of New York 
and Miss Lillian Whitney, who are spending 
the summer in California, were the guests 
of honor at an informal tea at which Mrs. 
Edgar Gilcreest entertained Tuesday after- 
noon. 

Dinners 

— Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron gave 
a handsome dinner party Monday night at 
their home in Burlingame in honor of Miss 
Maude Fay and Captain Powers Symington 
and the Symington relatives, who are here 
from the East for the wedding. There were 
about thirty-five guests seated at a large 
table handsomely adorned with flowers. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bothin entertained 
friends at a dinner party at their home in 
Ross on Thursday evening. 

— Captain William Hays Hammond, U. 
S. A., and Mrs. Hammond were hosts at a 
delightful dinner party at their quarters in 
the Presidio Monday evening. The party 
was given for Miss Mary Scott of Los An- 
geles, who is visiting Captain and Mrs. Harry 
N. Rising in the Presidio. 

— Frank Madison will be host at a dinner 
party on Friday evening at his home in San 
Rafael. 

— Mr. and Mrs. E. Denman McNear gave 
a small dinner and bridge party at their 
home in Petaluma last Friday evening. Mr. 
and Mrs. George Pinckard, Mr. and Mrs. 
Philip Foster Brown and Mr. and Mrs. 
Dwight Armstrong motored up for the party. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Nion Tucker celebrated 
the fourth anniversary of their marriage on 
Saturday by having a few of their friends 
dining at their home, with informal dancing 
afterward. 



In Town and Out 

— Mr. and Mrs. Hall Roe and their sons 
have prolonged their visit at the Mt. Diablo 
Country Club, where they have been for the 
past two months. 

— Dr. Alanson Weeks left Monday for 
Monterey to join Mrs. Weeks and their lit- 
tle daughter, who are spending the summer 
at the Hotel Del Monte. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Uda Waldrop are spend- 
ing the summer in Ross with Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Raas. They will be there until after 
the High Jinks of the Bohemian Club at the 
Grove, which Mr. Waldrop always attends. 

—Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. McCormick and 
their daughters. Miss Margaret and Miss 
Mary McCormick, are enjoying a visit of 
several weeks in Los Angeles. They will 
visit in Coronado and San Diego before re- 
turning to Santa Barbara. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Bothin, who 
have been spending the last few weeks at 
Lake Tahoe, will go to Santa Barbara for 
a few days' visit before returning to their 
home in San Rafael. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Clark have 
arrived from New York to spend the sum- 
mer in California. They have taken apart- 
ments at the Hotel Fairmont for the period 
of their stay. Last week they passed in 
San Mateo with their son and daughter-in- 
law, Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Clark Jr., 
and their two little granddaughters. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Lincoln Brown 
left on Sunday for the East, accompanied 
by their son, Albert Lincoln Brown, who 
visited here for a couple of weeks. He is 
returning to resume his studies at Harvard. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Dibblee passed 
the week end as guests of Mrs. Charles Fel- 
ton at Los Altos. 

— Mrs. Chauncey Penoyer is at her home 
in Burlingame with her sister, Mrs. Welling- 
ton Morse of Pasadena. They will be here 
but a short time, leaving early next month 
for the East en route to Europe. Mrs. 
Penoyer has been abroad most of the time 
since the death of her husband, and will re- 
turn to Europe for an indefinite stay there. 

—Mrs. Malcom D. Whitman and Miss 
Marjorie Josslyn have gone on a hunting 
and fishing trip toward Northern California. 



It's not the picture 
It's your eyes. 



Ai the movies you often think the picture 

is 1. lurir. I or tin- focus is bad. That's 

not usually the rast — it's your vision 
that's defective and needs correction — not 
the picture. 

w, D. Fennlmore A. R. Fennimore 

J. W. Darls 



^iullli^ 




San Francisco - 181 Post, 2508 Mission St*. 
Berkeley - - - - 2106 Shattack Avenue 
Oakland ----_. 1221 Broadway 



July 15. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



It is very doubtful if Mr. Whitman will come 
West this summer. 

— Mrs. Harry D. Johnson and Mrs. Gus- 
tavus Ziel are visiting friends at Bolinas for 
a fortnight. 

— Mrs. William H. Crocker chaperoned a 
party of young folks to the Crocker home 
at Pebble Beach over the week end. The 
young people are friends of Charles Crocker, 
who returned from school a week ago. 

— Mrs. Andrew McCarthy and her three 
children have closed their home in San 
Mateo Park and they have gone to Glen- 
brook to remain a month. 

— Mrs. Frederick Hope Beaver has gone 
to Iverness for the summer season. 

— Mr. John E. Carney has arrived from 
New York and is visiting in San Francisco 
at the Hotel Fairmont. He passed the week 
at Del Monte and was entertained infor- 
mally at several of the Pebble Beach homes. 
He will be here for several days. 

— Mrs. George Howard has gone to Tahoe, 
where she will be the guest of her brother 
and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. 
Schmiedell, throughout July. 

— Mrs. Alpheus Bull, her daughter. Miss 
Newell Bull, and her niece, Miss Katherine 
Robinson, have taken a cottage in Carmel 
for two months. Mrs. Bull's two daughters, 
Mrs. Edward Bullard and Mrs. Noble Ham- 
ilton, and their families have taken a house 
together in Ross for the entire season. 

— J. W. Zellerbach and family are at 
Feather River Inn for the season. Mr. Zeller- 
bach caught the limit of fish in Gold Lake 
two days running. 

— A. B. Saronia and family of San Fran- 
cisco are guests at Feather River Inn for 
the season. Mr. Saronia caught the limit of 
fish one day in Jameson Lake and another 
day in Plumas Eureka. 

Intimations 

— Mr. and Mrs. Addison Starr Keeler will 
come to San Francisco from their place at 
San Rafael July 20. Their old home, where 
they have lived all year round for the past 
four years, has recently been sold to Mr. 
and Mrs. Evan Evans Jr. 

— The James K. Armsby and the Ralph 
Palmer families will leave July 24 for the 
East, going by automobile via Seattle and 
the North. Mr. and Mrs. Armsby plan to 
meet their son, Jeffrey, in New York. He 
is en route home from Europe. 

— The christening of the two babies of 
Mr. and Mrs. Mountford Wilson Jr. took 
place at the Mountford Wilson home in Bur- 
lingame last Thursday afternoon. The Wil- 
sons and their children returned the next day 
to their home in Nevada. The babies have 
been called Russell and Mary Bell Wilson. 

— The World's Art Salon, a society re- 
cently formed for the interest of all Cali- 
fornia artists and their creative work, will 
give a large fashion tea and dance at the 



LEARN COSTUME DESIGN— 

Ion illustration — Pattern Drafting. 
M miners Making pnlng 

\ isil Exhibition of Students' Work 
Classes !>:»> and Krenln* 
Phone Pros] 

FASHION ACADEMY, Inc. 

Scottish Kito Templa 



I "mi filter St. 



Fairmont Hotel early in August. Mr. George 
McGowan is president of this fine organiza- 
tion. The afternoon's entertainment will in- 
clude a showing of California-mlide garments 
made in the latest Paris designs. Mah 
Jongg, the new Chinese game, will be one 
of the interesting features of the affair. 

— For the first time in many years Mr. 
and Mrs. William H. Crocker will have the 
pleasure of having a large family reunion 
this month. Mrs. Crocker's sister, Princess 
Andre Poniatowski (Elizabeth Sperry) and 
her sen John arrived Sunday in New York 
from Paris. On the same boat were Count 
and Countess Andre de Limur (Ethel 
Crocker) and their daughter, the little Helen 
Marie, who was born here about two years 
ago. Miss Helen Crocker awaited their ar- 
rival in New York. The party will come West 
next week. Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Alexan- 
der of New York (the latter a sister of Wil- 
liam H. Crocker) arrived here July 12 and 
very likely they will all come West together. 
This is their first visit since 1915. They 
will divide their time between the Fairmont 
and the country. 

— Mr. and Mrs. George Bowles are ex- 
pected home from New York about the mid- 
dle of the month. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Wakefield Baker are re- 
ceiving the congratulations of their friends 
on the birth of a son, which occurred Sun- 
day. The little boy will be named after his 
father. Mrs. Baker was Miss Margaret Madi- 
son, daughter of Frank Madison, and her 
child is his first grandchild, and is also the 
first grandchild of Mr. Baker's mother, Mrs. 
Edward Bosqui. 

— The rivers and streams are now at just 
the right height of water for fly fishing and 
the guests of Feather River Inn are every 
day getting the limit of fish in the river and 
streams nearby and in all the lakes, of which 
there are forty-two within ten miles of 
Feather River Inn, the trout are now taking 
flies. 

— Major and Mrs. Laurence Redington 
are coming from their home in Baltimore 
early in November to pass three months in 
California. The army officer will receive his 
leave of absence to cover that period. As 
Miss Josephine Parrott, Mrs. Redington was 
a great favorite in California. 

At Del Monte 
The summer polo season is now on at 
Del Monte. The greatest array of polo play- 
ers in the history of Del Monte is now on 
hand. Hugh Drury. Eric Pedley, Major Max 
Fleischmann and Samuel F. B. Morse of the 
Del Monte Club; Harry Hunt, William 
Crocker. Lawrence McCreery and Dick 
Schwerin of San Mateo, and the officers of 
the Eleventh Cavalry of the Monterey Pre- 
sidio are taking an active interest in the 

play- 
There was an exciting match at Del Monte 
last week with Hugh Drury captaining the 
winning team composed of Harry Hunt, Wil- 
liam Crocker and Dick Schwerin. against 
the Eleventh Cavalry, captained by Major 
John A. Robenseon. 

The Del Monte and Pebble Beach golf 
courses are gay places these days with 



crowds engaging in friendly matches. The 
California junior championship this week end 
is arousing much interest among boy players. 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Fleishhacker of San 
Francisco are at Del Monte to watch the 
progress of their son, Herbert Jr., in the 
competition. Norbert Murray of Pasadena 
and Bobby Ross of Los Angeles and Don 
Davin of San Diego are other boys on hand. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Syer of San Jose have 
entered their son, Bobby. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Neylan and their 
youngest daughter are at Del Monte for a 
month's visit. They have been spending much 
of their time with Dr. and Mrs. Albert J. 
Houston of San Francisco, who have opened 
their beautiful rustic house at Pebble Beach 
for the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis de Cebrian of San 
Francisco have been at Del Monte for some 
time, having Mrs. Algernon Crofton, Mrs. 
Ceberian's mother, as their guest. 

Much interest is being taken on the Mon- 
terey peninsula in the Junipero Serra cele- 
bration, which will take place in Carmel on 
July 21, 22 and 23. A monument in honor 
of Father Serra is to be placed in Carmel 
Woods and there will be appropriate cere- 
monies. 



BABYLON 

On the Bay at San Carlos 



The most unique and exclusive re- 
sort for motorists on the Coast 
Babylon's Chicken Maryland 

or Duck Dinners $2.50 

Breaklasts and Lunches at 

I ..sonable Prices 

SMusic and T>ancing Every Night 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eyebrows arched and rnoles, warts and 
superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest improved multiple needle ma- 
chine. Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Deary Street. Suite 723 Whitney Bids. 

Phone Douglas 6232 
Oakland. Suite 424, Flrnt Natl. Bank Bldg. 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

Make Your Reservations 

at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sntter 8130 

Under Management CARL S. STAN'LET 



J.E.BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

• • • • • • 
PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

• • • • • • 
JEWELS In Platinum 

• • • • • • 
REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

• • • • • a 

UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

• • • a • a 

FINE JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 

• • • • • • 

EXPERT Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 15, 1922 





financial; 




By P. N. BERINGER 



JUST WHEN the statisticians in the em- 
ploy of Uncle Sam were ready to an- 
nounce t'lat everything pointed quite defi- 
nitely to prosperous times ahead the rail 
strike was added to the coal strike as a 
disturbing economic factor. The coal and 
the rail strike will certainly affect the trend 
and hold back for a much greater length 
of time the era of prosperity which was 
announced as ready to be heralded to the 
world. Strikes always operate that way and 
this is not going to be an exception to the 
rule. 

* * * 

And in Europe, where the cards were set 
for better conditions, the flaming outburst 
in Ireland, the monarchist murders in Ger- 
many, followed by uprisings of reds, have 
again thrown the situation back to where it 
was right after the signing of the armistice. 
The allied nations find themselves face to 
face with a very ticklish situation, critical 
to a degree, and they have tightened the 
lines along the Rhine. Eventually the prob- 
ability is that the allied forces will have to 
march to Berlin and take control of a task 
it seems the German Republican government 
has found impossible to successfully manage. 
Germany has been issuing money about as 
fast as the printing press cylinders can be 
made to revolve and that money is rapidly 
becoming more and more valueless. The 
San Francisco News Letters has predicted 
that there would be an uprising in Germany, 
the result of which could not be foretold. 

* # ¥ 

That uprising is now at hand and it is 
hoped the German Republic is strong enough 
to put it down. The Republican form of 
government is attacked on the one hand by 
the very strong remnant of monarchists and 
on the other hand by an ever increasing 
volume of people, who have become con- 
verts to communism, despite the horrible 
example in Russia, right over the border. 
It seems difficult to believe that the phleg- 
matic and sober German sould ever be swept 
off his feet by the sophistries of those who 
have worked the Russians into an economic 
state of national insanity, but if one is to 
take the press reports in consideration as 
facts, the Russian propoganda has been ef- 
fectively successful in Germany. The next 
few days should tell the story. The riots 
and near revolutions in Germany will surely 
have their effect on the economic state of 
Europe. 

* ¥ * 

As a matter of fact, the prosperity ad- 
vertised by Germany all over the world has 
been a fictitious condition brought on by the 
big manufacturers and the politicians in 
power and these have been making hay while 
the sun was shining. The product of fac- 



tories, paid for with paper marks, has been 
sold the foreigner for good yellow gold. Why 
shouldn't the conscienceless German factory 
owners believe in the unlimited printing of 
valueless paper money? He has thus shame- 
lessly profited on the labors of poor Hans and 
Gretchen and now these two are clamoring 
for something else and they do not much 
care what that something else may be. 

This week will see an effort on the part 
of the operators and the Government to open 
up the big collieries of the country. It is 
said that adequate protection will be given 
the operators by the Government and the 
whole strength of the army will be employed 
to carry out the decree of the Labor Board, 
if it is necessary to use force. The rail 
strike is not really as bad today as it was 
at the same time last week, although much 
greater violence is being shown by the strik- 
ers in the unions' attempts to stop the rail 
lines filling places with other help. The 
unions have been bitterly disappointed by 
not finding other unions ready, or willing, 
to strike in sympathy with them. 

The Pacific Traffic Association has had 
its annual excursion and the Harvard carried 
a happy crowd of men and women out to 
sea on Sunday. The "chow" was the best 
the company affords and there were all sorts 
of amusements provided. 

* * * 

Ninety tourists and visitors, guests of tha 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, went 
to Mill Valley on the hospitality hike on 
last Sunday. They were taken to Blithedale 
Canyon and thence up one of the most pic- 
turesque trails to the summit of Mount Tam- 
alpais. Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Marsh enter- 
tained the hikers at their beautiful place in 
Mill Valley at luncheon. The next hospi- 
tality hike will be given by the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce on July 16. 

Lagunitas or Ross will be the objective. 

* * q: 

American merchants are said to be losing 
trade ground in China and many are said 
to be retiring from that country on account 
of the unsatisfactory conditions. It is said, 
in addition, that if the Trade Act were rati- 
fied between the two countries that much 
of this dissatisfaction would automatically 
disappear. The China Trade Act provides, 
among other things, for the Federal incor- 
poration of American firms doing business 
in China. This bill has been before Con- 
gress for at least two years. 

* * * 

The West Coast Life Insurance Comany 
cpened its new building to the public on 
Tuesday morning. This is located at Second 
and Market streets. Eleven thousand special 



invitations to attend this opening function 
were mailed to friends of the company. The 
general public was also invited and availed 
itself of the opportunity. 

* •¥ * 

The German mark is seeking new and 
lower levels every day. And that is bad for 
Germany and bad for the rest of the world. 

Labor troubles have brought Italian in- 
dustrial establishments to the closing of fac- 
tory doors. The Italian Government is face 
to face not only with a labor crisis, but with 
a governmental crisis and a financial ques- 
tion which it is most difficult to solve. 

The Silver Pick, of Goldfield, is now rec- 
ognized by all as a big mine. The develop- 
ments continue in the direction of Columbia 
Mountain. The company reports the big vein 
developed to the fourth level, and above the 
third level ore runs in excess of $40 and 
there is very rich ore exposed in several 
places. Work will shortly be prosecuted be- 
low the 400 level to open up the vein, as 
the ore body shows every indication of per- 
sisting to greater depth. Recent shipments 
have averaged $60 a ton and the workings 
on the fourth level are exposings ore of a 
still better grade as the center of the ledge 
is neared. 

The Tonopah mills' bullion shipments for 

the final half of June totaled $327,312. 

* * * 

Encouraging reports come from the Tono- 
pah Divide. Gross monthly earnings are av- 
eraging $55,000. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

( OMMISSIOX STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

3.12 Busli Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seems necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 



37-45 First Street 



San Francisco 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

l ippostte Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny ;!91 San Francisco 



July 15. 1922 



Sunbeams 



Lawyer: And what was the defendant 
doing meanwhile? 

Witness: He was telling me a funny story. 

Lawyer: Remember, sir, that you are un- 
der oath! 

Witness: Well, anyway, he was telling 
me a story. — Pearson's Weekly. 



A man who was asked to give a recom- 
mendation for a patent medicine said, "It 
is the best medicine I have ever tried. I 
bought a half dozen bottles for my mother- 
in-law, who was at the very gates of Para- 
dise when she began taking it, and it pulled 
her through." 



Wife — John, if you keep on you'll drive 
me to drink! 

Husband — Now, Mary, have you got some- 
thing in the house you're hiding from me? 
— Amer. News Trade Journal. 



"May I kiss you, Jennie?" asked the 
young man in the parlor. 

"Oh!" replied Jennie, "mother's in the 
other room." 

"That's all right," replied the young man, 
"your father can kiss her." — Judge. 



Grogan — Oi'll not take it. It's too high. 
There's as much nourishment in a pint av 
paynuts as in two pounds av steak, anyway. 

Butcher — That may be, but there's no 
gravy an' nothin' for the cat an' no hash 
the nixt day. — Boston Transcript. 



"Madam," said the little man in a movie 
theater, "I can't see anything but the back 
of your head." 

"Well, sir," replied the matron, with a 
frosty look, "do you see anything wrong with 
it?" 



The new minister had asked Al Jones to 
lead in prayer. It was Al's first experience, 
but, not wishing to disappoint his new pastor, 
he complied. Twenty minutes later found 
him still praying. 

The congregation was becoming restless. 
Finally, from a deacon's pew, there came a 
loud and devout "Amen." 

Unbending his knees the supplicant ex- 
claimed, "God bless you, deacon! That's 
the word I've been trying to think of ever 
since I started!" 



Quincey. colored, was always complain- 
ing about his wife. One day he said: "My 
wife. Mainly, s always asking me for money. 
She done ask me for three dollars jest now. 
Once she ask me for seven dollars. Last 
week she done begged me for five. This 
morning she comes whining for fifty cents. 
Always money — money— money! " 

"Well, what does she do with all this 
money?" Quincey 's listener asked. 

" 'Deed I don't know, sah. I nebber give 
her none!" — Judge. 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 

A young traveling man noticed a drove of 
hogs on a timber lot acting very peculiarly. 
They would run up to a tree and squeal, 
then leave that tree and go to another and 
do the same thing, continuing their mad 
scamper around the timber lot. 

"What makes them act that way?" he 
asked an old farmer, evidently the owner, 
standing nearby. 

"Well," replied the old man, "last winter 
I had a throat infection and couldn't speak 
for a month or more and couldn't call them 
to their feed, so I taught them to come by 
rapping on a post or a tree, and now the 
darn woodpeckers are setting them crazy." 
— Judge. 



15 



Cafe Marquard 

GEARY AND MASON STREETS 
Telephone Prospect 61 

Visitors in San Francisco Delight in the 
Gay Bohemian Atmosphere, the Enter- 
tainment and Dancing, the Rare Quality 
of Food and Courteous Service 



LUNCHEON 

Continental Style 

Twenty-six Delicious Dishes, Prepared 

and Served So Differently 



DINNER 



Every Evening — Six to Nine 
Also Select a la Carte 



Dancing and Cabaret 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 



NOTICE 

In the Superior Court of the State of California 
in ana for the City and County of San Frtiu- 
C1BCO. 

In the matter of the application of the San Fran- 
cisco News Letter and California Advertiser, 
to be declared a newspaper of general cir- 
culation under the provisions of section 4460 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Notice is hereby given that Frederick Marriott 
has filed in the above entitled court a petition 
alleging that the San Francisco News Letter and 
< lalffornia Advertiser, is and ever since July 
liO, 1856, has been a newspaper established, 
printed and published at regular intervals, 
namely, on each Saturday, excepting the Sat- 
urday following the great fire of April 18, 1906. 
for the dissemination of local and telegraphic 
news and intelligence of general character and 
having a bonaflde subscription list of paving 
subscribers, and that it has been declared to be 
a newspaper of general circulation by decree 
of the above entitled court given in or about 
the year 1880. but that the records thereof have 
been destroyed and asking that it be adjudged 
ami decreed to be a newspaper of general cir- 
culation within the provision of section 4460 
Of the Political Code of the State of California. 
s.i ni order will he applied tor before Depart- 
ment No. i of the above entitled court 
upon Tuesday, September B, L922, at the hour 
of in a. in. nt which time and place any person 
Interested may appear and show cause if any 
they have why m should not be 

granted, 
' 1 Lted June 28, 1 9 

FREDERICK MARRIOTT. 
('. F. Adams. Attorney at Law. 703 Market St. 



BELVEDERE 

Rent or Sell — Attractive Home 

Eight Room i ■ - Bal hs, Furnished 

SAX GKHOXIMO 

Furnished— Six rooms. 
two baths. "Id ivory finish throughout; 
r ust lc bridges. Redwoods. 
APPLY DR. B. \V. HAIXKs 




MILLS & HAGBOM 

afatinrs 

New Location, ALEXANDER BUILDING 
155 Montgomery St., Cor. Bush 



REDWOOD LODGE and BUNGALOWS 

IN THE IIF\RT OF THE BAKTA (RI7. Mill NT MS l.t .l.li.hf 

A ROMANTIC RESORT M>K WEEK-END \\l> PERMANENT GCE8T8 — famofs FOR 

KOSPITAUTV— GOOD nni- VM> Ml IHTIIIM '.-IHUK DRIVE OTER MM LOS 

GATOS-8ANTA IRFZ HIGH WAT — nils Till VI. VK Bill Mi 

A.k Anv >. r. Tirkrt An.nl; Sre lVrk-Jndah Co., ST'J Murkrt St.. -»n Fr»nri»ro. or CnMrHt, 
Onklnntl. or A.l.lrr.. A. P. COX, Crop. URIt.HT-. I Al. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 15, 1922 




PL/EASURE/S WAND 



Imperial 

Mystery, intense and thrilling, attends al- 
most every moment of the Paramount pic- 
ture, "For the Defense." The most sluggish 
spectator is stirred and excited. The plot 
is a good, strong one and is carried through 
by an exceptionally fine cast, headed by 
Ethel Clayton, whose ability to cope with an 
exacting role is well known. Zazu Pitts in 
the part of the timid-brave little waif does 
excellent work, and Mayme Kelso has a 
weird character part in which she is con- 
vincing. Bertram Grassby gives his melo- 
dramatic tendencies full scope as the Hindoo 
nerve doctor, and produces some spine-chill- 
ing effects. The other items on the program, 
musically and otherwise, are up to the high 
standard of the Imperial. 



"Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

passing," shows a new Buster Keaton com- 
edy, "The Blacksmith" and ends with 
Severi's orchestra offering popular selections. 
The feature play is made from J. C. Lincoln's 
story "The Rise of Roscoe Paine" and serves 
to display Miss Castle's charming personal- 
ity, her varied athletic accomplishments and 
her wonderful wardrobe. Certainly this ac- 
tress has a genius for dressing; she not only 
wears her different costumes well, but seems 
to impart individuality to each one. Inter- 
esting Cape Cod scenery is beautifully pho- 
tographed. 




Columbia 

John Drinkwater, the English author of 
the great play founded on America's noblest 
historical character, Abraham Lincoln, says, 
"In putting a dramatic conception of Lin- 
coln before his own American people .... 
I should like it to be remembered that it is 
not the dramatist's business to compete with 
either the historian or the biographer. I 
have not attempted to state everything, but 
to state something with imaginative lucidity." 
And this he has done in the play now en- 
joying a phenomenal run at the Columbia 
Theater. A company of forty people are 
employed in the production, and the title 
role is taken by Frank McGlyn, powerful 
San Francisco actor, whose close personal 
resemblance to the martyred president is in- 
deed remarkable, and whose acting through- 
out the six scenes of the drama is of such 
an excellent quality that the spectator leaves 
the theater feeling as if he had come into 
actual contact with the great and lovable 
man himself. This play deserves the splen- 
did success it has achieved in London and 
New York. San Franciscans are fortunate 
in having this opportunity to see it. 



Portola 

"Destiny's Isle" is full of incident, but to 
even the most lenient member of the audi- 
ence this appears a poorly constructed play, 
illogical and unconvincing. Virginia Lee as 
the heroine found on a desert island has a 
hectic life, but with all the spirit of the movie 
queen she comes through unscathed. Georga 
Fawcett makes the best of a poor role, be- 
cause he is a fine, honest, dependable actor. 
A Toonerville comedy fills in between the 
feature and an excellent travel film. The 
music is good and the news reel is of great 
interest. After all, it is the things that really 
happen and the people who really are peo- 
ple that leave the deep impression. 



California 

A distinctive program at the California 
this week begins with an interesting "review" 
film, followed by Irene Castle in "No Tres- 



Alcazar 

"Main Street," that widely read and deep- 
ly discussed novel that we have all of us 
laughed and cried and puzzled and argued 
over, is now in the second week of its dra- 
matic version at the Alcazar, and seems to 
create as much interest among the theater- 
goers as with the reading public. The Alca- 
zar players do some good work, notably 
Gladys George, in the part af Carol, and 
Herbert Heyes, the new leading man, 
strengthens the good impression he made, as 
the physician of Gopher Prairie, a role by 
the way requiring considerable skill and act- 
ing art. 



Century 

The second week of "Abie's Irish Rose" is 
on and the house packed with laughing pa- 
trons. This Morosco production is a scream 
from start to finish and well worth anyone's 
time. The fullest use of Irish and Hebrew 
characteristics has been made, but without 
offense to either nationality. And underlying 
it is a vein of sound common sense that 
will benefit listeners from all religions and 
beliefs. As to the acting, it is excellent. Some 
of the cast are familiar figures locally and 
all show good direction. Humor-loving peo- 
ple should avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunity to inveigle their dyspeptic friends to 
this show in order to relax the pent up 
muscles. It is a sure tonic for all forms of 
grouch. 



Orpheum 

The sweetest singer heard for many a day 
in vaudeville's realm is young John Steel, 
delighting Orpheum audiences this week 
with his lovely tenor voice in a repertoire of 
songs that embraces the popular and the 
classic and pleases lovers of all kinds of 
music. Mr. Steel's appearance is in his favor 
and his manner is one of simplicity and 
charm. Then comes the dance; from the 
Russian Imperial Ballet we have Theodor 
Bekefi and a troupe of talented dancers. 
Kane and Herman, in an amusing skit called 
"Midnight Sons," afford diversion. Butler 
and Parker, in "Don't Make Me Laugh," 
fail to enforce the injunction. Mildred Har- 
ris has many qualifications for stage success 
besides the fact that for a brief period she 
was Mrs. Charles Chaplin. Blonde and 



pretty, with a bright little play called "Movie 
Mad," she fills the time allotted to her in 
a manner highly satisfactory to her audience. 
Flo Lewis, a clever little singer of comic 
ditties, and Bill Robinson in black make-up 
and dancing clogs, do their share toward 
making the week's bill the success it is. 



Granada 

Jack Holt is a star. And he has found a 
fine setting in the play "The Man Uncon- 
querable." Handsome and possessed of a 
strong dramatic power, this sterling young 
actor promises great things. The presence 
in his company of Edwin Stevens, well- 
known character actor of another decade, 
adds interest to the play, and Sylvia Breamer 
is an attractive heroine with a somewhat 
bizarre taste in dress. "In Maddest Mexico" 
the drama might be named. Fights and res- 
cues abound and local color is smeared on 
heavily. The romantic touch is not lacking. 

"Any Old Port" is the comedy of the 
evening, and is full of laughs. Paul Ash 
"jazzes em up" in great style. The Wright 
dancers afford much entertainment. 



Strand 

Another long bill is offered this week con- 
sisting of a Zane Grey story, the usual Mutt 
and Jeff cartoon and an Al St. John comedy. 
In addition, there is some fine music by Fitz- 
patrick's players and the customary weekly 
topical reviews. 

The feature, "When Romance Rides," is 
a Western play with an anti-climax and 
several weak and objectionable parts, but 
is very true to life and seems to be an en- 
deavor of someone's to make the familiar 
wild west stuff appear more realistic. Time 
is given to other than the main actors, a 
thing rarely done in these days of screen 
idols. The cast is large and adequate, the 
locations new and the riding excellent. There 
are several animals in the picture that will 
please the fans. All in all the show is well 
balanced and in keeping with the manage- 
ment's avowed determination to give the 
public the best entertainment in their line 
in the city. 



SAMFRAMCISCO 



\n ™ude<ju.v% 




\ 



MA ™f s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 23c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Logos 



July 15, 1922 

The "Serra" Play 

Desolation, and the grim lonesomeness of 
the waste places will be vividly reproduced 
in the pageant drama of "Serra," which will 
be staged in the Forest Theater at Carmel 
on the nights of July 21, 22 and 23. Not 
alone tourists, but many native Californians 
who are wont to see the picturesque mis- 
sions of the present day have no realization 
of the heart-breaking surroundings in which 
Father Junipero Serra carried on his life; 
work, and in which he eventually gave up 
his life. All of this will be faithfully and 
historically portrayed by Art Director Ger- 
stle Mack, who has made an intensive study 
of those times. 

While the title part of Serra will be taken 
by the eminent actor, Herbert Grimwood, 
and a few professionals will enact the more 
important roles, the rest of the personnel 
of the cast will be made up of residents of 
Carmel and other California cities. Among 
those taking part are the two pretty daugh- 
ters of Jimmie Hopper, the well-known mag- 
azine writer. 

Others taking leading parts are William 
Sauter, a member of the Walter Hampden 
Company; Morris Ankrum, a rising young 
actor who has been closely associated with 
the work at the University of California; 
Dan Teteroth, author of the play, and who 
took the leading part of the Piper in the 
last Mountain play. Grimwood was selected 
after a long process of elimination by the 
committee in charge as having the physical 
and mental characteristics more nearly ap- 
proaching those of the character he is to 
portray. To those who have watched him 
in rehearsals, he has made a deep impres- 
sion in the part. 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



Bright Comedy at Alcazar 

"Nightie Night" will have its first staging 
Sunday matinee, July 1 6. This play was the 
reigning sensation for an entire year at the 
Princess Theater, New York, and enjoyed 
similar success on tour. 

Herbert Heyes, whose starring season at 
this playhouse has proved to be one of the 
events of the theatrical year, is expected to 
be exceptionally well fitted to the stellar role 
in this hilarious vehicle. Gladys George's 
talents insure a careful rendition of the chief 
feminine characterization and the other 
members of the company will be seen at 
their best. 



Next Week at Orpheum 

Edith Taliaferro, one of the country's best 
known legitimate actresses, will present 
"Under the Same Old Moon" with a wonder- 
ful cast and scenic effects; John Steel, the 
marvelous tenor, has been an unqualified 
hit. His final week will be all too short to 
accommodate the people who wish to listen 
to the great artist; Richard Coburn, famous 
song writer, and a dandy company will ap- 
pear; Cissie and George Sewell will present 
an attractive d.ince fantasy in three scenes; 
Truly Shatluck and Emma O'Neil are on 
the bill; Margaret McKee, the California 
whistler, will interpret opera and popular 
melodies; Kane and Herman. "The Mid- 
night Sons," will appear in a comedy turn; 



theTh 

ling 



Three Danoise Sisters will perform 
feats of daring and agility. 



start- 



Lillian Russell's Successor 

As a special representative of the De- 
partment of Labor to investigate conditions 
of life amongst the working women of Eu- 
rope, Mrs. A. B. Spreckels has been ap- 
pointed to the position formerly filled by 
Lillian Russell. The famous stage beauty 
made some important reports and suggestions 
relative to immigration. Mrs. Spreckels is 
noted as a patron of art and a collector. 
She has been in Europe for some months 
and is assembling art objects for display in 
San Francisco. The collection will be shown 
in Paris before being brought here. 



17 



A Wonderful Tonic 

The quiet, restful atmosphere of the Fair- 
mont Grill appeals to business women as 
well as men. Away from the noise and 
bustle of the city; an hour in the Fairmont 
is a wonderful tonic. Only a few minutes' 
ride to the Fairmont Grill, on Nob Hill ; 75 
cents. 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

63 Acres For Sale 



Ideally situated. Gently rolling. Beautiful Las Uvas creek, 
never ending water supply, runs for one-half mile through center 
of property. Bungalow, tank house, small orchard, thousands 
of cords of wood along creek. Forty acres can be cultivated. 
Nine miles from Morgan Hill on Las Uvas road, or twenty- 
one miles from San Jose via Almaden road. 



Price $9000 



Apply Owner, Room 382 
235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 



Fire, Earthquake, Automobile, Use and Occupancy, Riot and Civil Commotion, Explosion, 
Plate Glass, Fidelity and Surety Bond 

INSURANCE 
THE LONDON & LANCASHIRE INSURANCE CO., Ltd. 

LONDON, ENGLAND Incorporated 1H61 

ORIENT Insurance Co. of Hartford, Conn. LAW UNION & ROCK Insurance Co., Ltd. 
Inaorpontou inn; of London — Founded 1806 

LONDON & LANCASHIRE INDEMNITY COMPANY of America 

Orgnnlted under the liiwa of the State of New York — I in oriiornt ed January. 1916 

Pacific Department: 332 Pine Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
Geo. Ormond Smith, Manager 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



VACATION NOTICE 

Babsvrlb*$n denirins tin* >nn I'rHtirl.iii Newt Letter f or w anted 

to their » 11 miner iiddrrs- durinc the vacation period should 

PIIONK DOl «•! \^ fi*53 

Or Write to the Office. 23.1 Montgomery Street No extra rharce for till- aervire 

SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gough 
Telephone Park 271 



"SAVE YOUR TEETH" 

SPONGY, BLEEDING AND SORE 
GUMS ARE WARNINGS OF 

PYORRHEA 

Treat yourself at home with 

PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 

Package with directions postpaid 
for $1.00 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

908 Market Street, at Powell 
San Francisco 

Please mention News Letter 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Dalian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. Iteidesdorff 



Dr. Susan Harris Hamilton 

OSTEOPATH 
SPECIALIZING in NERVOUS DISEASES 

ST. PATJLBLDG. 291 GEARY ST. 

Hours — 10 a.m. to 12 m., 2 to 4 p.m. 
Phones — Douglas 226, Prospect 15 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

The Automobile 



July 15, 1922 



Inserting a New Valve Stem 

When an inner tube valve stem becomes 
injured to such an extent as to render it 
worthless it is not necessary to discard the 
entire tube if the rubber is still good. A 
new valve stem may be inserted into the 
tube in the following manner: Cut a small 
hole in the tube, several inches from the 
original position of the valve. Push the in- 
jured valve into the tube and draw it out 
through the new hole. The new valve may 
be inserted into the second hole and drawn 
up tightly in position. It is inadvisable to use 
the original hole for the new valve, nor 
to remove the old valve stem through it, 
as the rubber may be somewhat weakened 
at this point, and will tear easily. The old 
hole may be closed by cementing a patch 
over it, using a patch somewhat larger than 
is really necessary in order to support the 
tube at this point. 



Record Car Production Sets New Mark 

Passenger car production has reached a 
point where it indicates an estimated yearly 
production for the industry of 3,000,000. 
May's record total of 252,000 cars and 
trucks renders such an estimate essential 
as a basis for future calculations, even 
though it may mean little or nothing in re- 
spect to the total production volume of the 
current year. 

Capacity has doubtless been practically 
reached by the leading producers. How long 
the rate will be maintained seems to depend 
largely upon the turn of agricultural markets 
with the approach and passage of the harvest 
season. So many variables are involved that 
the prophets hesitate to speak. That the 
output of 1922 will exceed that of 1921 but 
by no very great margin is still believed. 



Menace to Safety 

Advertising signs along the right-of-way 
of Oregon highways will be removed at once 
and signs on private property removed when- 
ever permission can be gained, according to 
a decision of the State Highway Commission. 
The State highway engineer says the signs 
are a menace to safety, declaring that a 
motorist, while reading a sign of ten let- 
ters, will ordinarily drive 140 feet, in which 
time he may drive off the road or into an- 
other machine. California might inmitate 
the example. 



Locating a Short-Circuit 
If there is a short-circuit in the electrical 
line, it may usually be detected without the 
use of instruments. A short-circuit always 
generates heat at a point where it takes 
place. Passing the fingers along the lines 
in search of a warm spot will usually locate 
the short-circuit, which should immediately 
be insulated with rubber tubing or tape. 

"Now give an example of how 'circum- 
stances alter cases.' " 

"Well, Milwaukee isn't famous any more." 




WE KNOW HOW 

Your car is piling up a big repair bill 
every mile you drive without proper 
lubrication. You can depend upon 

LOYAL AND EFFICIENT SERVICE 
at the 

DE LUXE GARAGE & SERVICE STATION 

Post and Hyde Sts. Phone Franklin 3 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1 174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Watch Your Feet 




Weak, fallen or broken arches reduce 
your efficiency, cause headache, back- 
ache, sciatica, pelvic and stomach trou- 
ble, as well as other ailments. 

THE POST SYSTEM 

for foot correction restores the flexi- 
bility and resiliency of the feet. 

The Post System for Foot Correction 
259 Geary Street, San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6147 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital. 
Reserve Fund 



Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept., 1921 




.$ 25,000,000.00 
.. 17,500,000.00 



. 25,000,000.00 
.$ 67,500,000.00 



.$359,326,760.00 



OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

359 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, 

Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of 

Australasian Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of Calif., National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bk., Crocker Nat'l Bk. 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1922 

Assets $76,170,177.18 

Deposits 72,470,177.18 

Capital Actually Paid Up - - - - - 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - - - 2,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund ----- 385,984.61 



A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4 54 ) per cent 
per annum was declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 

RECOMMENDS 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 6600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3 4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital H5.000.000 Total Aaarla Over J4-9.000.000 (15,000,000 Reserve Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

486 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK: 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 
PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 
of Automobiles 



We Stand for the Best In Business 
Training 



Munson 




School 



For 
PRIVATE SECRETARIES 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 
Send for Catalog 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11 :30 to 2 p. m.) .... 75c 

Pinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holldays..$1.75 

Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 







PRICE 10 CENTS _ _ _ _ __ . _ , Z. $5.00 PER YEAR 

TAX PAYERS WEEKLY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



AY, JULY 22, 1922 



LOS ANGELES 







EARLY SAX FRANCISCO (No. 15). A LITHOGRAPHER'S STORY OF THE GREAT FIRE OF JINE -2-J, 1861. 

The flames destroyed houses and merchandise valued at $3,000,000. It started on the west side of Telegraph Hill, near Broad- 
way, and swept south along Stockton street, carried by a heavy gale. At that time the leading residence part of the city lay 
directly in its course, which explains the comparatively small loss. The Are companies of that day were manned by volunteers, 
over a hundred men in each company, of business and working men. who pulled the engine by a long rope to the fires. In a 
conflagration like that in the picture the Are checking resources of the city were utterly Inadequate, which explains the many 
big fires and immense losses during the pioneer period. The view is taken from Russian Hill. Many citizens watched the fire 
from this site, .iust as many residents did during the three days' burning of the city, April. 1S06. The flag in the right center of 
the picture marks the site Of the Plaza. In line with the flag is the famous El Dorado gambling house. To the righl of the flag 
is the Union Hotel, a landmark in its day. This fire roused suspicion of incendiary origin. Business men started an inquiry, 
which later led to the formation "of the Vigilance Committee of 1S51. 




MILLS & HAGBOM 

(Failure 

New Location, ALEXANDER BUILDING 
155 Montgomery St., Cor. Bush 



REDWOOD LODGE and BUNGALOWS 

IN THE HEART OF THE SANTA CRl'Z MOUNTAINS — Established 1859 

A ROMANTIC RESORT FOR WEEK-END AND PERMANENT GUESTS — FAMOUS FOR 

HOSPITALITY — GOOD MEALS AND EVERYTHING — 3-HOUR DRIVE OVER NEW LOS 

GATOS-SANTA CRUZ HIGHWAY — OPEN THE YEAR ROUND 

Ask Any S. P. Ticket Agent; See Peck-Judah Co., 672 Market St., San Francisco, or Crabtree's, 

Oakland, or Address A. P. COX, Prop., WRIGHTS, CAL. 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



g>an JFntttriaro QQfromrk 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 

A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



Best Equipped and Most MODERN 
GARAGE West of Chicago 

The Century 



Two Blocks front Union Square 
675 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Between Taylor and Jones 



Independent Buyers' League 

furnishes its MEMBERS with 
ANYTHING sold at whole- 
sale at wholesale prices. 
Be a Member 

Independent Buyers' League 

833 Market St., Room 902 

Phones Douglas 1203-1204 



Eyes Guaranteed 

Bother C3^C_3 Work at 

You? 27 7th St. 

DR. J. P. JTJHL 



FOB EXCEPTIONAL FOOD AT 
REASONABLE PRICES 

UNITED SERVICE 
RESTAURANTS 

and BAKERY 

UNIQUE SERVICE 

At Table or Counter 

Attractive Fittings 

Comfortable Surroundings 

NO TIPS 

22-26 CALIFORNIA STREET 

A Block from the Ferry 

TURK AND TAYLOR STREETS 

A Block from Market Street 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 



After an exhaustive search and a series 
w„ e ^P" lments covering a period of years 
»n vL °7 ofer'ne the Motoring public 
?«m , ele 5 5 amt -> ob guaranteed for 
coal ofior L urf f ee n,ay be cleaned with 
with n'i,.„1 aS0 i me ' or ma y be scrubbed 
vited nr ™„ S ' Yo , ur 'instigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



GUARANTEE 
BATTERY CO. 

Master 
Automobile Electricians 

— and — 




955-975 POST STREET 
San Francisco, California 



NOTICE 
In the Superior Court of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. 

In the matter of the application of the San Fran- 
cisco News Letter and California Advertiser, 
to be declared a newspaper of general cir- 
culation under the provisions of section 4460 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Notice is hereby given that Frederick Marriott 
has filed in the above entitled court a petition 
alleging that the San Francisco News Letter and 
California Advertiser, is and ever since July 
20. 1856, has been a newspaper established, 
printed and published at regular intervals, 
namely, on each Saturday, excepting the Sat- 
urday following the great fire of April 18, 1906. 
for the dissemination of local and telegraphic 
news and intelligence of general character and 
having a bonafide subscription list of paying 
subscribers, and that it has been declared to be 
a newspaper of general circulation by decree 
of the above entitled court given in or about 
the year 1880, but that the records thereof have 
been destroyed and asking that it be adjudged 
and decreed to be a newspaper of general cir- 
culation within the provision of section 4460 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Said order will be applied for before Depart- 
ment No. 1 of the above entitled court 
upon Tuesday, September 2. 1922. at the hour 
of 10 a. m. at which time and place any person 
interested may appear and show cause if any 
they have why said petition should not be 
granted. 
Dated June 28, 1922. 

FREDERICK MARRIOTT. 
C. F. Adams, Attorney at Law, 703 Market St. 



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Our Service Includes Following Places: 

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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 22, 1922 



No. 3 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— And is there a little sunburn in your home? Don't all answer 
at once. 

— Notice the tan look everybody seems to be getting at the office 
this time of year. 

— German ship turns turtle in Hamburg harbor. Merely following 
the policy of the country. 

— International love affairs : America kisses her eleven billions 
she lent to Europe goodbye. 

— Ashes to ashes and dust to dust, if you really want to cast 
your vote then register "fust." 

— Everything comes to him who waits. But that's a fine way to 
spend a lifetime. Motto: Beat gravity to it. 

* * * 

— What happened to the million candle power searchlight that 
was to be placed on Mt. Tamalpais or Twin Peaks. 

— America needs a merchant marine, but vocabulary never built 
even a rowboat. Congressional record please copy. 

* * * 

— There is talk of turning The Hague into a hospital. At the 
rate Europe is talking there an asylum would be a better selection. 

* * * 

— What is arbitration? From the union's viewpoint, a chance to 
boost the wage scale if favorable, and a chance to strike if it isn t. 

* * * 

— If Lincoln could only come back and see Frank McGlynn, like 
the Irishman, he would say: "He looks more like me than I do my- 
self." 

* * * 

— A permanent building for the live stock and horse show is 
badly needed — it should receive the generous support of all San 

Francisco. 

* * * 

— If Paris decrees long skirts for unshapely limbs, then fair Miss 
San Francisco is entitled to disport many an abbreviated bathing 
suit, if the reverse applies. 



— Bridge the Bay is under way — at Dumbarton. Yes, but San 
Francisco still needs to widen the neck of the traffic bottle. Other 
bottles need no encouragement. 

— The railroad strike commences with the usual thuggery by the 
strikers, mob rioting and murder. Will Harding follow Wilson's 
old slogan "watchful waiting"? We think not. 

— C. C. Moore is not going to have much difficulty in gaining a 
great deal of public confidence, despite Mr. Hearst's Brisbanic sup- 
port of Johnson, self-crowned with a wreath of almond shells. 

— Powell street is developing into a very forward looking shop- 
ping street, many new changes showing the flux of shopping center 
north. Three years from now Mason street will be a big rival to Grant 
avenue. 

— Edison and Ford advocate issuing paper money on the security 
of land, water power and Lizzies. They are only jealous of the in- 
ventor of Eskimo Pie and his wrappers and they want to go him 

one better. 

* * * 

— Ireland wants to know what America thinks of her situation. 
England would give thanks to anyone who could offer ■ some solu- 
tion. Irish papers carry the caption "War" on all fronts. Poor dove 

of peace. 

* * * 

— The open road has had many followers the past two months. 
But the crop of reckless drivers increases in the ratio of new de- 
votees to the iron chariot. One hundred dollar fines for speeding 

would save a lot of lives. 

* * * 

— If some of the poetic senators who talk about the honest, hardy, 
ambitious immigrant who should be permitted to enter our country 
would take one steerage trip and see the human flotsam that is being 
dumped through our Eastern ports, the bars would go down for- 
ever. 

¥ * * 

— The proposed five billion power and hydro electric control act 
would regulate California from a leading unit of the commonwealth 
to a rocky financial tail-ender. It would be a step back into the 
dark ages of graft, corruption and political patronage to a degree 
unknown in the old days. 

* * * 

— I have heard of the fellow who drank the ingredients that would 
make a walking still of his body and also of the disastrous effects. 
I have heard of the man who drank lemon extract for the kick. 
Now comes forward a Paris physician who has invented the oxygen 
shot. This gives one the combined effect of renewed glands and moon- 
shine liquor, without any aftermath in the shape of headache. It 
should be given the name of the jagless jag. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 22, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




We are having in this country today a fine 
Union Ideals and Ideas exposition of the ways of unionism and the 

ways of the union and its friends. This is 
shown by the lawlessness, which breaks out here and there when- 
ever the unions or the will of the union's leaders is thwarted in 
anything they may undertake to do. If they have set about it that 
no man 01 woman shall take the job a union man or woman has 
forsaken the union members, or their friends, will not stop short of 
murder to prevent the employer giving this job to some one else 
willing to work. In other words, the members of unions, in such 
cases, hold to the stand that they are at liberty to throw away their 
opportunity to work but that at the same time they have a sort of 
proprietary right in the job and that they may, and will and can, 
prevent anyone else filling their places and working. And, as shown 
at Herrin, in the coal regions they may torture and murder and 
no one has a right to say they shall not and no one has apparently 
any right to interfere and punish them for the tortures inflicted and 
the murders that have been committed. Any set of men and women 
who have assumed that they are above the law and who look upon 
the courts as only the instruments for punishment, functioning for 
the benefit of the rich or the protected class, must eventually come 
to have such ideas. The high priest of labor, Samuel Gompers, says 
that the courts should not be allowed to interfere in labor cases 
as between employers and employed or as between union and union, 
in cases of a jurisdictional quarrel. Asked if, in a certain instance, 
of which there have been many, a man was prevented from work- 
ing, from earning a living and denied the membership in a union, 
would it not be better if that man could have his case reviewed 
by a court, and his membership be denied him or allowed on the 
decision of the court, Mr. Gompers said that the courts should not 
be allowed to have any say in the matter. When asked how this 
man was to get work the answer was "the best way he can." 



The union's best friend is that mythical 
The Union's Best Friend person, who may be singular or plural, 

who sets about to halt street cars, over- 
throw automobiles, smash windows, beat up men and women, shoot 
up a town, and in other ways carry on in a criminal way when- 
ever it is a question to terrorize the community into giving in to 
the union's demands. The union's best friend is a strange sort of 
being because if you ask the union man or woman this best friend 
is NEVER a member of a union. He could not be, you know, or 
he would not be so violent in his methods. He is simply carried 
away in the enthusiasm of the moment when he hits somebody over 
the head with a hammer, fractures the skull of a strikebreaker, 
places telegraph poles on a railroad track to derail a train, sets 
fire to a round house, cuts the couplings on a train or tampers with 
the air hose. It is perfectly astonishing what the "union sympathizer" 
will do, when he or she gets started. And it is strange the things 
that are done when you remember that this sympathizer is only a 
friend and not directly concerned in the strike or its results at ail. 
It is remarkable, too, that the employer, against whom the union 
has struck, has no such friends and has never developed a conven- 
ient class of citizens of this sort. When reprisals come from the 
employer's side the acts are committed by "hired hessians," "paid 
thugs," "criminal gun men," etc. 



Now that Uncle Sam seems to have taken 
Should Be a Show Down a stand in the coal and the rail strike, it 

is high time that there should be a show 
down. If the unions are stronger than Uncle Sam and can impose 
their will, no matter what they are asking for, we had better, all 



of us, know it. And if Uncle Samuel is out for an edifying exhi- 
bition of how he can impose the will of the nation there never was 
a better opportunity than now to show his power and his desire 
that the law shall be obeyed and this applies just as well as to the 
employers as it does to the employed, on strike or otherwise. 



President Harding has come out 
President Harding and the Strikes in a strong and temperate ex- 
position of the stand the govern- 
ment will take in the two big strikes. These strikes may now be said 
to have been merged into one great insurrectionary move to defy 
governmental decrees. President Harding has made every effort 
to arrive at some sort of peaceful solution and a just adjustment 
of the problems to be solved and the operators of coal mines showed 
their willingness to enter into such negotiations, by a national body 
of arbitrators and to abide by the results of that arbitration, no 
matter what that result might be. On the other hand, the coal miners 
have shown no desire to meet with anyone. They have made their 
decision and there is nothing to arbitrate or talk about. It is the 
same way with the railroad strikers. They have taken their stand 
and they will not budge an inch. 

President Harding has done the sensible thing. He has taken 
his stand for the people as against an organized minority of the 
people and that stand is squarely on the platform of the American 
Plan. The decree of the Railroad Labor Board is to be enforced on 
employer and employed, if the whole power of the combined militia 
and regular army and navy has to be used. 

We have come to a point where a clear cut decision must be 
had. We must know and we must know it definitely and decisively 
where there is an invisible government of the United States con- 
troled by Mr. Gompers and his brother union chieftains. It is made 
still plainer that the two big strikes are but one movement to assert 
the power of Mr. Gompers over the nation, through the call which 
it is alleged Gompers has made on the railroad brotherhoods to help 
enforce his will on the country. That the progress of the unions of 
late years would inevitably lead to just such an expression of auto- 
cratic power was inevitable and now, that it has come, is also come 
the time for the government of the country to smash all signs of 
insurrection flat. 

The unions on strike are in revolt against the government of the 
United States and any revolutionary movement in this country may 
not be tolerated for one instant. 



For a long time the Board of Supervisors of San 
One Great System Francisco has been literally "playing horse" with 

the question of the purchase of the properties of 
the United Railways (the Market Street Railway) Company. Last 
week one of the brilliant members of the body governing the affairs 
of San Francisco proposed that all negotiations entered into with 
the private street car company looking to purchase "be cancelled." 
There is nothing to cancel, as a matter of fact. Nothing that really 
looked like a serious consideration of the purchase of the road had 
ever been undertaken. It is true that the wise men foregathered 
and talked and talked and talked but beyond giving individual 
opinions as to the value of the property, and what it might pos- 
sibly be purchased for, little or nothing was done that was tangible 
in the way of purchase was ever attempted. The Supervisors simply 
frittered the people's time away in futile persiflage. Now it looks 
as though the whole matter would have to be referred to the people 
for action, by including the proposition of purchase on the ballot 
at the next election. The people of San Francisco are of one mind 
as to the purchase. They want one street car system, not two. And, 



July 22, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



if they are given the chance they will express themselves that way. 
When they do the Board of Supervisors will have to seriously con- 
template arriving at a decision as to what shall be paid and not 
waste time in idle and useless oration at the people's expense. 



The storm of protest against the 
Outcry Against Motion Pictures low tone of the motion pictures 

is rising steadily. In the United 
States Senate the other day Senator Myers of Montana made a 
bitter speech on the necessity of a drastic censorship. He charged 
the picture houses with increasing the crime wave and lowering the 
moral tone of the community. He cited an atrocious murder in 
Washington, D. C, attributable to the immoral influences of the 
movie dramas. The people who control the picture business, Sena- 
tor Myers said, pander to the prurient to increase their profits. "Con- 
gress will be forced to heed the protest of the decent people that 
the youth of the nation be not morally poisoned." The Senator 
added : 

"I believe that a great deal of the extravagance of the day, a 
great deal of the disposition to live beyond one's means, comes 
from moving pictures. Through them young people gain ideas of 
fast life, shady ways, laxity of living, loose morals. Crime is freely 
depicted in alluring colors. Lax morals are held up lightly before 
them. The sensual is strongly appealed to. Many of the pictures 
are certainly not elevating; some, at least, are not fit to be seen. 

"The pictures are largely furnished by such characters as Fatty 
Arbuckle, of unsavory fame, notorious for his scandalous debauch- 
ery and drunken orgies. William Desmond Taylor, deceased, mur- 
dered for some mysterious cause; one Valentino, now figuring as 
the star character in rape and divorce sensations. Many others of 
like character might be mentioned. 

"At Hollywood, Calif., is a colony of these people, where de- 
bauchery, riotous living, drunkenness, ribaldry, dissipation, free love, 
seem to be conspicuous. Many of these "stars," it is reported, were 
formerly bartenders, butcher boys, supers, swampers, variety actors 
and actresses, who may have earned $10 or $20 a week, and some 
of whom are now paid, it is said, salaries of something like $5000 
a month or more, and they do not know what to do with their 
wealth, extracted from poor people, in large part, in 25 and 50 
cent admission fees, except to spend it in riotous living, dissipation 
and 'high rolling.' 

"These are some of the characters from whom the young people 
of today are deriving a large part of their education, views of life, 
and character-forming habits. From these sources our young peo- 
ple gain much of their views of life, inspiration and education. 
Rather a poor source, is it not? Looks like there is some need for 
censorship, does it not? There could be some improvement, could 
there not?" 

The moral reformation the distinguished statesman from Montana 
desires will not come by appointment of official censors. We are 
obsessed by the false notion that we can make the nation chemically 
pure by having a set of politicians in Washington, or some other 
center of government, pass a law ordering the purification. 

If the people desire elevating drama they will get it. If they 
prefer peurility and pruriency, the purveyors of filth will supply the 
demand. 

The moral uplift of any nation depends on the lessons of re- 
straint, economy and decency taught in the homes. A nation is 
what the fathers and mothers make it. 



have become a cancer sapping the industrial and commercial vi- 
tality of our State, should be allowed to enjoy a walk-over for re- 
election. 

Is there never to be a vigorous protest of the citizens who now 
pay four dollars to the one required for State expenses before 
the Johnson machine was put together? If people lack the energy 
and courage to fight against legalized robbery they deserve to be 
robbed. 

Whether Friend W. Richardson will make a great Governor we 
cannot say. He has made an excellent treasurer, and in private life 
has shown himself a first-class business man. He cannot possibly 
make a worse Governor than Governor Stephens, judging him from 
the taxpayers' standpoint, for the latter's administration, if con- 
tinued, would end in ruin of the State 



Probably at no time since the auto- 
Yosemite and the Automobile mobile became responsible for the 

building of good roads has there 
been so much complaint about bad roads as there is today about 
the condition of the roads in and out of the Yosemite Valley. It is 
useless to go into the discussion here as to whether the roads are 
good or bad. It is the unanimous opinion among automobilists who 
have made the trip this year that they could not be worse. The 
roads may be good roads, despite such a reputation given by those 
who drive in and out of the valley. That the dust is of such char- 
acter as to be almost blinding and that automobiles are partially 
destroyed with every trip made into the valley is the evidence gleaned 
in talking with anyone who has been there and back. Evidently 
nothing much could be done to remedy such a state of affairs in 
a moment, but those having the roads in charge should remember 
that a road which must constantly be maintained and repaired is 
the most expensive road ever devised for man's use. Macadam roads 
were all right in the long run when vehicular traffic was of such 
character that it "packed" down the road bed. After the auto- 
mobile came into general use there arose the necessity of making 
an entire revision of the conclusions that had been arrived at in 
the past. The result of a nation and a world-wide study has found 
itself in hard surfaced roads — roads the automobile cannot "suck" 
to pieces. That is what the automobile does to roads. It literally 
"sucks" them up and churns them into dust. It follows that the con- 
crete road or the asphalt road, in certain territory, are the best 
roads for long continued wear and roads of this kind may be 
maintained with the least cost to the taxpayer. The roads into the 
Yosemite should be concreted and as the travel is bound to increase 
phenominally these roads should be of the most permanent char- 
acter of concrete construction. Probably the road bed should be 
made eight inches in thickness and it should be constructed under 
the most careful inspection as to materials and work. 



It is good news for the taxpayers 
Must Change the Governorship that the Governorship fight has nar- 
rowed down to a contest between 
Friend W. Richardson and Governor Stephens. It would be a scan- 
dalous thing for California that the Governor, under whom taxe- 



The Industrial Association of San Francisco 
A Matter of Religion is the authority for the statement published 

that "in New York City the union organiza- 
tion fined every union man who worked on St. Patrick's Day." This 
is a wonderful instance of what may be done in the way of estab- 
lishing forced reverence for a saint, among those belonging to the 
unions, no matter what the religion of these union members may be. 
And if you are Jew or Protestant, or of any other religious belief, 
not in accord with what St. Patrick believed in. you may work but 
vou will be penalized if you do so. The question which arises is as 
I :> when the unions will have the power to enforce a general worship 
for St. Patrick all over the country, or whether where other union 
men and women may be in the majority and be followers of some 
other religious cult may enforce the worship of this or that other 
particularly designated favorite of this or that church? Union mem- 
bership will then become a matter of religious beliefs. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 22, 1922 




_.. lHtotlr'<kviltrllto>ir 
'Che thai Kill fkj Ux <kiil.sir. with jva 



— The idea that it is a peculiarly fitting thing to make sheriff s 
deputies out of strikers in the case of preventing disturbances at 
railroad shops is one of the most ghastly jokes ever perpetrated by 
labor. It is on a par with the statements of sheriffs and policemen 
that after a terrible riot in which men have been maimed and some 
of them murdered, there could be no evidence found of any striker 
being connected with the affair. The dear little lambs, why, of 
course, they had nothing to do with it. Those workers shot and 
maimed themselves to make a case against the strikers, that is all 
there is to it. Who ever heard of a striker as being violently in- 
clined? 

* * * 

— Speaking of strikes, and the usually attended disorders, makes 
me think of the recent wholesale tortures and murders practiced 
at Herrin, 111. Now, at this particular place is a bad lot of strikers, 
who do not believe in being good little bleaters like the rest of 
Mr. Gomper's lambkins. They beat up, tortured and killed and they 
are proud of it and proud of what their women did and they will 
tell you it is "none of your darn business." And they base this 
defiant attitude on the ground that it is a thing they 'av done before 
and are going to do again, if they feel like it. And, in this case, 
the sheriff very evidently believes that it is safest to say that he 
could not prevent what has happened and having happened what 
is the use of making a row about it? Well, it all depends on what 
the State of Illinois and rest of the nation thinks and will do about 
it. It looks as if nothing at all was going to be done and that Herrin 
and its red-handed criminals will go right on doing just as they please 
about murdering and torturing those who presume to work for a 
living in their midst. 

— At $5 per automobile the income of the Yosemite park commis- 
sion for last year should figure out something like seven hundred 
thousand dollars. A repair crew of forty men is said to be con- 
stantly employed on these roads. And the roads are in the most 
deplorable condition. Returning automobilists say that instead of 
taxing the machine owners going into the park, these individuals 
should be handed from one hundred to five hundred dollars for 
damages inflicted on perfectly good machines, through traveling over 
impossible mud roads, buried a foot deep in dust. One man has 
told me he believes this neglect of the roads is done with the pur- 
pose of keeping the machine tourists away from the park. Any- 
way, he says he would not go back there again for five hundred 
dollars. And, besides, the question is: What is being done with 
the money collected? Why not build cheap concrete roads, cheapest 
of all roads in the end. The macadam, or mud road, is the most 
expensive road in the world to build and to maintain. 

— It is no longer a question to pant or not to pant. The hiking 
season is on in full swing and the pants craze for women has in- 
vaded every State in the union. Hiking has become as popular in 
New York as it is in California and the bobbed-hair panted women, 
from sixty to six, plod along the highways of Westchester, or the 
roads of Jersey, with just as much freedom as they do the trails 
about Mill Valley or Mt. Tamalpais. Out in the Mission the other 
night a party of six women of varying ages emerged from a movie 
show. All had heads bobbed and all wore trousers. A little more 
time to wait and you will see the trousered evening dress for ladies. 
The neck bare as far down as possible and the legs tightly be- 
trousered as far up as possible. 



DM Ink 

A CERTAIN well-known professor used to tell a story in regard 
to an old housekeeper he once had. He said to her one day, 
"Look here, I'll make you a sporting offer: the very next planet I 
discover I will make you a present of a sovereign." "You are very 
kind, sir," she replied, "and I am sure I hope you will soon dis- 
cover one." Several months went by, and though the housekeeper 
waited eagerly, no plants were discovered. At last she lost patience 
and confided in the professor's wife. "I can't understand it at all, 
ma'am," she said. "Do you know, I think the professor goes out 
at night and discovers planets on the sly." 

He was an amateur gardner of the very green order, yet he felt 
that somehow he had been cheated over the last lot of seeds he had 
purchased, and accordingly called on the florist to make complaint. 
After a lengthy harangue, to which the florist listened in stony sil- 
ence, he finally asked: "Oh, by the way, what is a hardy rose?" 
"It's one," was the retort, "that doesn't mind your wife pulling it 
up by the roots every day to see if it has begun to grow yet." 

The kirk of a certain village in Scotland was badly in need of 
repair, so one of its most popular members, by name Sandy McNab, 
was asked to collect subscriptions for this purpose. One day the 
minister came across Sandy walking irresolutely along the road, and 
at once tumbled to the cause. "Man, Sandy," he said earnestly, 
"I'm sorry to see ye in this state." "Ah, weel, it's for the good o' 
the cause," replied Sandy quite happily. "Ye see, meenister, it's 
a' through these subscreeptions. I've been down the glen collectin' 
fun's, an' at every hoose they made me hae a wee drappie." "Every 
house! But — but — but surely, Sandy, there are some of the kirk 
members who are teetotallers?" "Aye, there are," came the reply, 
"but I wrote tae those." 

A story is told concerning Father Bernard Vaughn when he was 
touring in America. A boastful American at St. Louis said to him 
one day, "Look at our Mississippi and Hudson rivers. Why, in 
comparison with them your Mersey and Severn and Thames are 
sleepy, sickly streams." "Oh," said Father Vaughn, "I think yours 
are just as sickly as ours." "How do you make that out?" "They 
are all confined to their beds," replied Father Vaughn. 

A certain man had been dining well, but not too wisely, and as he 
was staggering along homewards, a friend met him and suggested 
that perhaps he would be better if he were to sit quietly in a pic- 
ture show for a time. They accordingly went in together, but in 
a little while the friend found the inebriated one sobbing quietly 
to himself although the picture then flickering across the screen was 
certainly not a pathetic one. "What's the matter?" he hissed "Why 
can't you sit quiet and look at the picture?" " 'Sno good, ol' man," 
sobbed the other. "I've gone stone deaf. I can't hear a single word 
they're saying." 

* * * 

A soldier was being tried for assaulting his sergeant. "Now, 
please tell us at once, without any prevarication," said the officer 
who was prosecuting, "did you or did you not strike the sergeant?" 
The prisoner was very thoughtful for a few moments, then he turned 
to the officer and said, "Please, sir, the answer is in the infirmary." 



— The new San Francisco advertising movement has started 
phoenix-like from the ashes of the BB failures. But this bird looks 
as if it is really going to fly. 



July 22, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




Points for Property Owners § t 



L Making the Most of the Opportunity 

BBJiaBlglHiliaEliBlBlIHgiaElllllHllHBlBIHiaillllllllllllliailllSlBHB IHIHHIHHIIglH8WK][glBIHBIH[g»r: 

BY MONTGOMERY SMITH 



PROPERTY OWNERS should initiate a movement for the pur- 
pose of taking advantage of every gathering, either local or 
from abroad, that convenes in San Francisco with a view to a pre- 
sentation, in an attractive form, of the advantages which accrue to 
those who live here. 

In other words, there should be something done in a systematic 
way to put before people who may have gathered together for any 
purpose whatsoever the advantages which lie in making San Fran- 
cisco the home or business place of the reader. That work would 
be effective booster propaganda along the most effective lines, 
through the use of printer's ink. 

There are so many things the taxpayer and property owner 
doesn't know about San Francisco. Just as an instance, let us point 
to the great lack of information which is widespread about the 
wharf facilities and the means of handling ocean and river trade. 
How much does the average citizen know about foreign trade and 
whether or not San Francisco is making any progress as against 
its American and especially Pacific Coast port cities in capturing 
the export and import trade and the shipping to care for that trade 
and make it a permanent thing for us? 

What does the average citizen know about the value of the great 
back country and its products and the necessity of keeping that 
back country as a natural feeder to the city while the city becomes 
an ever-increasing purveyor to the back country? 

To be sure we have some conscientious individuals, who are pos- 
sessed of good business heads and who are members of the Chamber 
of Commerce, who do try to make everything known about the 
port and the back country, but the people they reach are, most of 
them, already convinced and they need no further argument on the 
subject. Those who should be reached are just the average citizens, 
not those who own large individual interests or who are stockholders 
in great corporations. The Chamber of Commerce and the Cali- 
fornia Development League both publish pamphlets and journals 
giving this information, but these are circulated like the usual house 
organ of some great corporation and while doing a great deal of 
good, the same money invested regularly in legitimate publications 
would do a vast deal more good to the city. 

And that brings to mind a very curious condition prevailing in 
the Chamber of Commerce. That body publishes a magazine weekly. 
This magazine has evidently, if one is to judge by the patronage 
extended to it by the chamber members, had little success in secur- 
ing enough to keep it going. The probability is that the members 
must feel that it is not quite a legitimate thing for the chamber to 
publish this weekly in direct competition with those who are in the 
publishing business. The argument has been advanced that if the 
chamber, or any other body, invades the business lines of the pri- 
vate citizens in this way there is really no valid excuse why it may 
not pursue the Soviet idea a little farther and engage in the sale 
of musical instruments or hardware or run a bakery. Every sub- 
scription sold and every advertisement taken is just that much, ac- 
cording to those who disapprove, taken away from some legitimate 
publisher who depends upon the subscriptions he gets and the ad- 
vertisements secured for his living and the living of all those in his 
employ. 

It should be remembered, too. that publishers have never, as far 
as is known, refused to publish Chamber of Commerce or Develop- 
ment Board publicity free. 

And this brings us right back to the original idea of the folder 



giving the advantages of San Francisco as a residence and business 
place. This folder should be profusely illustrated. It should not 
contain any advertisements and it should never be sold. It should 
be given away, always. 

The trouble with the property owner is that unless somebody 
steps hard on his toes he is not ready at any time to do anything 
other than look on while the other fellow is doing the work. The 
work the other fellow does usually increases the value of the prop- 
erty held by this quiet observer, the owner. The property owner 
should be doing something all of the time himself to add to the 
value of his property, to add to the value of the district in which 
his property is situated and to make his city more attractive to in- 
vestors and to those who would make it a place of future residence 
or a business location. 

Property becomes valuable because it is in demand and no prop- 
erty is in demand in a community which does not advance with 
the times. Indeed, in a condition bordering on the ideal, a com- 
munity should be kept, by its property owners, just a little ahead 
of the times. We not only need an increasing citizenship but we 
also need an improvement in the character of this citizenship. It 
is only by keeping forever at it that the property owner can im- 
prove the class of people who pay him rent. Just as surely as he 
lets his property down, lets the neighborhood drop into a run-down- 
at-the-heel class, just so surely will the characteristics of his tenantry 
droop and become a bedraggled lot, who will pay less rent and care 
less about where they lie or how. 

It is up to the property owner to be a live factor in the com- 
munity and if he is not he may expect to see lower rents and higher 
taxes and fewer desirable tenants. 



Classy Apartments 




For Sale, $36,000 

Rents $5,280 per annum 

/I APARTMENTS of 4 rooms each, 
^ hardwood floors, steam heat, wall 
beds; inviting lobby; building in fine 
condition, near Bush and Jones. 

Only $11,000 Cash 

required for these down town 
apartments 

ADDRESS 382 RUSS BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 22, 1922 



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PERHAPS you have often wondered, after reading the story of 
Aladdin and his lamp, as to the appearance of the famous 
Genii of the lamp, and his name. The quest for the Genii, and his 
Genalogy has just been completed. Stepping from the ferry boat 
to the Oakland mole, the other evening, on a typical San Francisco 




Hat Creek No. 1 Development, Viewed from (lie 
Penstock Line 



night, flashing festoons of lights skirting the swirling waters of the 
bay, a myriad of stars overhead, the bustle of the overland trains, 
lazily snorting, awaiting the hand of the engineer to put the latent 
power in motion, and here the quest commenced. We left, a party 
of newspaper editors from Northern California to view the hydro- 
electrical accomplishments and projects of our State. Our destina- 
tion was the Pitt River, Shasta County. En route we passed up 
through the fertile Sacramento Valley, up into the hill country, un- 
der the tower loftiness of Castle Crags, through Shasta, and into 
the timber country over the McCloud railroad. Here the timber 
land of the North bustled with the swish of the axe, the fall of 



hum of saws, and the progress of the builders of civilization. Then 
through a fairyland of tall trees their foliage and peaks lost in 
the heights, like wanderers in a vast giantland of nature, we came 
to the land of "Pee-Gee." His work was apparent on every side. 
His chief monument was the Pitt River power house, and the Hat 
Creek projects, comprising a total of seven units, which will gen- 
erate 140,000 horsepower, and transmit at 220,000 volts. Here un- 
der the guidance of the indomitable "Pee-Gee" rivers had been 
turned aside, tunnels bored through mountains, rights-of-way cleared 
for 200 miles over forest and dale, hill, mountain and plain land, 
gigantic turbines, motors, and transmission equipment reared its 
lofty solidity on every side, and with all this scientific development 
of progress the natural beauty was preserved and in many cases 




From Hat (reek No. 2 the Stream Branches off to 

Join the Pit 

enhanced. One marveled at the organization that "Pee-Gee" the 
sprite of progress had developed. Everything had a place, every 
bolt, nut, screw, or bar, was conceived, thought out, designed and 



the forest giant, the long line of logging cars, the mill pools, the planned two hundred miles away, to eventually take its place in the 



July 22, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




as these who are making our State what it is today. And "Pee-Gee," 
if you do not already know, is the invisible spirit who combines all 
that the Pacific Gas and Electric represents, in men, money, minds, 
and material, and with his slogan, the service of the people, holds 
together this organization, which allows the world, which is you 
and I, to take Aladdin's metaphor and truly make slaves of the 
lamps, by the touch of a button. 



Pit No. 1 Power House on June 15, 1922 

sphere of things, up here under the forests of the north. But the 
human organization was even as great an achievement as the phy- 
sical plant. Small cities of beautiful bungalows, and club houses 
that would do credit to any country club or city edifice, with its 
billiard rooms, reading rooms, libraries, showers, and recreation 
facilities, the big social halls, the friendly commissariat where any- 
thing from "the makings" to a suit may be obtained. The spirit 
of loyalty, of service, of human neighborliness and friendliness seem 
to be borne here and grow strong as the days passed. The sumptuous 
banquet which greeted us the evening of our arrival served by the 
wives and daughters of the employes at the Pitt River plant No. 1, 
will remain with us as an accomplishment equally deserving of our 
gratitude, the more so being totally unexpected. Few of us, going 
to our rooms of an evening and casually switching on the electric 
light, ever stop to realize of the world of human service, accom- 
plishment, duty, devotion and energy that under the guidance of 
the irrepressible "Pee-Gee" has been brought to us. To attempt 
to describe in a technical manner the Pitt River project, fast near- 
ing completion, the Hat Creek projects, with its giant flumes, beau- 
tiful spotless buildings, with its swiftly revolving generators and 
motors, would be a task well nigh impossible. Efficiency has been 
defined as the ratio between an equitable standard of service of 
the Pacific Gas and Electric Company in Northern California, we can 
define it as the ratio between an actual achievement and an equit- 
able standard. They have set the standard by perfecting the achieve- 
ment. 

What before was a waste of waters, and a cluttered timberland, 
has under the guidance of "Pee-Gee," Aladdin's friend, been turned 
into a fairyland of beautiful community centers, located in the lap 
of selected scenic points, connecting by tunnel and tower, archi- 
tecturally artistic, the power of nature, into the factory, home, 
and building, of our cities, and brought to the far flung expanse 
of California's agricultural lands a relief from the physical burden 
and labor, a saving in cost and time, and a super-abundance of 
fruitful crops, for which the silent "Pee-Gee" chuckling at his handi- 
work accepts no other thanks than the knowledge that he has given 
courteous continuous service to the people of California. 
"Pee-Gee" serves no one master, he is owned by the people of 
California; 8213 people cheerfully do his bidding. He covers 54,- 
000 square miles of territory, he serves 1 ,800.000 people. He looks 
after 233 cities and towns, he never sleeps, and with him his cousin 
progress, keeps step. At Vacaville he built a distributing unit, which 
receives electricity at 220,000 volts and steps it down for distribu- 
tion into smaller units. Here vast transformers, and technical units 
handle the lightning that makes the wheels of the world turn. To 
the officers and members of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company, 
the newspaper men of Northern California pay a tribute, in that 
what we were privileged to see makes us feel proud of our Dal 
development, proud of our State, and prouder still of the men such 



TO THE FELLOW WHO'LL TAKE MY PLACE 

Here is a toast that I want to drink to a fellow I'll never know — 
To the fellow who's going to take my place when it's time for me 

to go. 
I've wondered what kind of a chap he'll be and I've wished I could 

take his hand 
Just to whisper, "I wish you well, old man," in a way that he'd 

understand. 
I'd like to give him the cheering word that I've longed at times to 

hear; 
I'd like to give him the warm handclasp when never a friend seems 

near. 
I've learned my knowledge by sheer hard work and I wish I could 

pass it on 
To the fellow who'll come to take my place some day when I am 

gone. 

Will he see all the sad mistakes I've made and note all the bat- 
tles lost; 

Will he ever guess of the tears they caused, of the heartaches which 
they cost? 

Will he gaze through the failures and fruitless toil to the underlying 
plan 

And catch a glimpse of the real intent and the heart of the van- 
quished man? 

I dare to hope he may pause some day as he toils as 1 have wrought, 
And gain some strength for his weary task from the battles which 

I have fought. 
But I've only the task itself to leave with the cares for him to face. 
And never a cheering word may speak to the fellow who'll take my 

place. 

Then here's to your health, old chap; I drink as a bridegroom to 

his bride; 
I leave an unfinished task for you, but God knows how I tried. 
I've dreamed my dreams as all men do, but never a one came true, 
And my prayer today is that all the dreams may be realized by you. 
And we'll meet some day in the great unknown — out in the realm 

of space; 
You'll know my clasp as I take your hand and gaze in your tired 

face. 
Then all our failures will be success in the light of the new-found 

dawn — 
So I'm drinking the health of the chap who'll take my place when 

I am gone. ANON. 



— Up on California street is a barber, a negro, who is growing 
hair on his bald knob with a preparation made out of the captured 
smell of the Sausalito distillery. The best of it is the hair is there 
to prove it. A county court, some time ago, gave orders to the man- 
ager of the distillery that he must abolish the smell. His chemist 
set to work and changed it into an agreeable odor and a liquid 
that will grow hair on a door knob. And if you need evidence to 
prove this to be true, ask the barber and any commuter on the 
Northwestern road. The answer will be a huge swelling chorus — 
"I'll say it will." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 22, 1922 



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THE MOST important moments in existence are those in which 
we come into the world and when we pass into the beyond. We 
greet the babe with smiles and we surround it with every care that 
it may grow strong and become a factor in the world's develop- 
ment. An J, whenever we may grasp the opportunity through life 
we associate ourselves of a preference with that which is beautiful 
and cheerful rather than with that which is sad and unbeautiful. 
We naturally turn to Nature for a relief from business cares and we 
find in the sound of water in the brooks, in the wind, in the trees, 
in the fragrance of flowers, in the vistas that open to our eyes of 
land and sea and air the greatest pleasures it is given to man to 
enjoy. 

Friendships we make and we treasure and, in the more intimate 
way, we twine about ourselves and we endear ourselves to others 
in our loves: loves for husband or wife and for mother or father, 
for children and grand children and, in many fortunate instances, 
great grand children. 

We know that we must part with these loves and these friend- 
ships and it is a joy to know that we can, when they have passed 
away, give them some measure of remembrance in the manner they 
may have been interred and the sweet presence we knew them in 



cared for forever. The day is past when it was sufficient that dear 
ones had been 'decently buried." Today the cemetery is a beautiful 
memorial park and the dead and the living are honored by the care 
bestowed on those that have passed on. 

Those having charge of Cypress Lawn have solved the question 
for us in such a charmingly beautiful way it seems comment is al- 
most unnecessary. They have truly made it possible to lessen the 
grief of the living. They have beautified Nature and they have 
provided in the Catacombs of Cypress Lawn a place where the bodies 
of the departed may rest, for all time, in a dry crypt, above ground. 
These Catacombs are restfully magnificent and it is almost impos- 
sible to convey, in mere words, the effective way in which the archi- 
tect has woven his color scheme of stained glass and the beautiful 
variety of stone and marble walls. Looking down the length of the 
Transept we are faced with a fernery, in which plays a spring and 
above this is one of Arthur Mathews' masterpieces in painting. An- 
other painting by the same celebrated artist surmounts the south end 
over the entrance. At either end of the Transept and on either side 
are private tombs. 

The most impressive and pleasing character is given the Catacombs 
by the removal as far as it is possible, of all evidences of death. The 




View of Cypress Lawn Showing Location of Mausoleum With Office Building in the Foreground 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




crypts are sealed with concrete and over this is placed a beautifully 
polished stone on which is engraved the name of the occupant. 
Each crypt is so arranged that, in no direction, does it touch the 
ground and every precaution is taken that in every way possible 
there shall be no contamination of moisture or by any other agency. 

Cypress Lawn cemetery cannot be described in the space allowed 
here, but it may be said that it is one of the most attractive park 
cemeteries in the United States, and that in it is found the Cata- 
combs, the building containing these being a creation of art in a 
setting that is remarkably beautiful. The Perpetual Care Fund should 
appeal to those who are of a mind to really love their dead. It 
amounts to near three-quarters of a million dollars and it insures 
its unfailing maintenance. 

Connected with the Catacombs is the Chapel and this is also de- 
signed to carry to the bereaved a sense of comfortable satisfaction 
as to the ones who have gone to their last sleep. Cypress Lawn 
has taken the sting out of death. 

The Catacombs came to be because of the insistent and growing 
demand for over-ground burial. Thus there came to be the Cypress 
Lawn Catacombs. These consist of 425 individual crypts and eleven 
tomb rooms. Visitors are made welcome and many of these have 
taken advantage of the visit to arrange for space in advance of the 
need. Information may be had of the superintendent or his assistant 
on any day, Sundays and holidays included, and those desiring in- 
formation and wishing to visit the building will be given every at- 
tention. 

Cypress Lawn cemetery is well worthy a visit in itself and the 
many views obtained from almost any part of this beautiful memor- 
ial park will rest in the memory of the visitor for years. The quaint 
chapel, the many pieces of fine sculptural art, the private mausol- 
eums will all be found of interest. There are 250 acres of land and 
these are being added to as necessity demands. Loving care seem; 
to always dictate to those who have this cemetery in charge and 



this is shown in the attractiveness of the park in general. The asso- 
ciation owns its own artesian wells and through this water system 
it maintains the lawns in everlasting green freshness. The flowen 
and shrubs have been selected by a master gardner and the eye 
is gladdened through the tributes thus given those buried in Cypress 
Lawn cemetery. 



ANNO UNCEMENT 

PINCKARD, SHAUGHNESSY 

& ANDERSON 

MEMBERS 
Till-: SAX FRANCISCO stock AND BOND EXCHANGE 

Announce the removal of their office from 
345 Montgomery Street 

To THE 

Mezzanine Floor 
California Commercial Union Building 

315 Montgomery Street 

Direct Wires to New York 



TELEPHONE SITTER 7363 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 22, 1922 




ociot 




Busy Cupid 

TELEGRAMS bring word of the marriage 
in New York of Mrs. Burton Elkins, 
daughter of Mrs. J. C. Breckenridge Oliver 
of Kentucky, now residing in Santa Barbara, 
and Mr. James Cresson Parrish Jr., which 
was solemnized in the Central Presbyterian 
Church of that city Monday. The bride is 
well known on this Coast, where she resided 
following her marriage to Mr. Felton El- 
kins of San Francisco, from whom she was 
subsequently divorced. She is a sister of 
Mrs. Harlow Frink and Miss Clara Oliver 
of Montecito. Mr. Parrish was graduated 
from Harvard with the class of 1907. He 
is the grand nephew of Commodore Cor- 
nelius Vanderbilt, a member of the Knicker- 
bocker, Racquet, and Tennis clubs of the 
Bar Association of New York. 

— Announcement of the engagement of 
Miss Cecelia McLaughlin, daughter of the 
late Captain Albert McLaughlin and of Mrs. 
M. A. McLaughlin, to Thomas J. Byrnes of 
Vancouver, B. G, was made by means of 
cards sent to the friends of the two families. 
The news was also told at a handsome lunch- 
eon given the same day by Mrs. L. E. White 
of Berkeley at the Hotel St. Francis. Sev- 
eral other affairs are planned to celebrate 
the engagement .The wedding will take place 
this fall, and the future home of the couple 
will be in Vancouver. 

— Ensign Charles Galloway Magruder Jr., 
U. S. N., and Miss (Catherine Loretta Cogan 
of this city were married at St. Peter's Chapel 
at the navy yard last Friday morning by 
Rev. Father Lamb, 0. P., of St. Vincent's 
Parish Church. Ensign Le Baron Lyons, 
U. S. N., was best man, and Miss Katherine 
O'Hern of Benicia was bridesmaid. Mrs. 
Magruder is the only daughter of Lieuten- 
ant-Commander William Neil Cogan, M. C. 
D. S., who has been attached to Mare Is- 




It is for you to say when you want 
to experience that thrill that comes 
only behind the wheel of a 

PEERLESS MOTOR 
CAR IN ACTION 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St 

Telephone Prospect 8800 



land for the past two years, and is a popu- 
lar member of the naval colony. Ensign 
Magruder is the son of Mr. and Mrs. C. G. 
Magruder of New Orleans. He and his bride 
left Tuesday for the East Coast via the 
U. S. S. Chaumont. 

— While no definite date has been set for 
the marriage of Miss Cornelia Clampett and 
Mr. Wiliem Shuman, it will be solemnized 
before the new year, probably in December. 
Mr. Shuman will leave for Paris in the early 
winter and the marriage will be held in that 
city, where the bride-elect and her parents. 
Dr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Clampett, are 
making their home. 

— Mrs. Caroline Madison, daughter of 
Frank D. Madison of San Rafael, went north 
last week for the wedding of Miss Dorothy 
Alexander and Joseph Lincoln Carman Jr., 
at which she was one of the bridesmaids. 
The Carman-Alexander wedding, which took 
place in Tacoma on Saturday afternoon, 
was one of the brilliant social events of the 
summer. 

Luncheons 

— In compliment to Mrs. Addison Starr 
Keeler, who is leaving San Rafael after hav- 
ing made her home there for many years, 
Mrs. Harrison Dibblee gave a handsome 
luncheon at Pastori's Monday afternoon. The 
Keelers are coming to town to live. About 
twenty-four intimate women friends of Mrs. 
Keeler, from Ross and San Rafael, were 
asked. 

— Mrs. William Babcock assembled a few 
friends at luncheon at her San Rafael home 
last Saturday to meet Mrs. Keeler. The 
guests were: Mesdames Albert Dibblee, 
James K. Armsby, Gustavus Ziel, Harrison 
Dibblee, George Beardsley, and the Misses 
Anne Pentz and Emmett. 

— Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton was hostess 
at luncheon in the garden of the Hotel St. 
Francis to Mrs. Robert Hays Smith. Mrs. 
Thomas Eastland, Mrs. Malcolm Whitman, 
Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels. Miss Laston Filer 
and Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker. 

— Mrs. William Ford Nichols, who will 
leave for the East with Bishop Nichols, was 
the guest of honor at a luncheon which Mrs. 
Samuel Boardman gave at her home re- 
cently. 

— Mrs. Clinton La Montagne entertained at 
a luncheon Thursday at her home in Ather- 
ton. The La Montagnes have been living in 
the peninsula city for the past year and they 
are occupying the Atherton Macondray resi- 
dence. 

— Mrs. Sydney Cloman entertained Mr. 
and Mrs. Lawrence McCreery and Miss Helen 
Garritt at luncheon in the Fable Room of 
the Hotel St. Francis on Monday. 
Teas 

— Mrs. Garret W. McEnerney entertained 
at a tea Tuesday afternoon in the Fairmont 



Hotel, at which she complimented Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank McGlynn. The party followed 
the reception to the actor and his wife which 
was given in the Red Room of the hotel 
by the Council of Catholic Women. Mr. 
McGlynn gave a short address on Lincoln. 

— Mrs. Margaret Bruce Beaumont enter- 
tained at a tea at the Palace Hotel Monday 
for Mrs. Ernest L. Williams of Cincinnati, 
who is a house guest of Mr. and Mrs. R. T. 
Harding. Also in the party was Mrs. Gerald 
Campbell, wife of the new British consul. 

— An affair for the younger element of 
society was the bridge tea given by Mrs. 
Frederick Fay for Miss Marjory Gay, who 
leaves with her mother, Mrs. George Gay, 
for Europe the latter part of the month. 

— Mrs. George McGowan will give a Mah 
Jongg tea August 5 at the Fairmont. In 
connection with it there will be a fashion 
show and Miss Cornelia Gwynn will do a 
Chinese fan dance. 

Dinners 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Sproule are in 
Los Angeles. While there they were enter- 
tained at dinner by friends at the Alexandria. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Christian Nielsen were 
hosts at a delightful dinner party given at 
Tahoe a week ago in compliment to Miss 
Elizabeth Schmiedell, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward G. Schmiedell, and her fiance, 
James Moffitt. 

— Colonel and Mrs. Osmun Latrobe will 
be hosts at a dinner party on Saturday night, 
July 29, preceding the fancy dress dance at 
the Officers' Club, when the guests will im- 
personate notable stars of the film world. 
Many of the guests on this occasion will be 
friends of their daughter. Miss Mary Stuart 
Latrobe, who graduated last month from the 
Dominican Convent at San Rafael prior to 
her entrance this fall in an Eastern school. 

— An American beauty dinner dance at 
the Fairmont Hotel on an evening the first 
week in August is to be given by Mr. and 
Mrs. George McGowan. 

In Town and Out 

— Mrs. Edward Barron, Miss Evelyn Bar- 
ron and Miss Louise Winston returned Sat- 
urday to California after a tour abroad, 
which covered a period of ten months. The 
Barrons have returned to their home in San 



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July 22, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



Mateo and Miss Winston is at the home of 
her sister, Mrs. Reginald Jenkins, in this 
city. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bolton and their 
children, Miss Betty and Miss Frances Bol- 
ton, have returned to their home in Broad- 
way after a several weeks' visit at Mr. Bol- 
ton's ranch near Santa Barbara. 

— Mr. Alan J. Lowrey has returned from 
a visit to his relatives in the Hawaiian Is- 
lands. The christening of the Lowreys' baby 
will not be held for several weeks, probably 
not before the middle of August. 

— Miss Sallie Maynard is home from Santa 
Barbara, where she visited for several days 
last week. 

— Miss Mildred Calhoun, who is visiting 
here from her home in Charleston, S. C, 
is spending several weeks at Fair Hills, in 
San Rafael, the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ar- 
thur William Foster. 

— Miss Helen Garritt returned Monday to 
her home in this city, after having passed 
the week end in Burlingame with Mr. and 
Mrs. Nion Tucker. 

— Mrs. Sherwood Hopkins and her de- 
butante daughter, Miss Lillian Hopkins, re- 
turned Monday from Santa Cruz, where they 
passed the week end at the Casa del Rey 
with Mr. and Mrs. William G. Parrott and 
Mr. and Mrs. Corbett Moody. 

—Mrs. Belle M. Curtis of this city is at 
the Hotel Virginia, Long Beach, where her 
niece, Mrs. R. J. Mallett, and son of Sacra- 
mento and Dr. and Mrs. W. M. Miller of 
Riverside are guests of Mrs. Curtis. 

— Mrs. Mark L. Requa of Piedmont has 
gone South to visit her daughter, Mrs. John 
Henry Russell. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Barnaby Conrad will leave 
soon for the South, where they will be the 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. George Choate Ken- 
dall at Santa Barbara. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Roy Pike have returned 
from a trip to New York and have opened 
their home in Pacific avenue. 
Intimations 

— Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Huntington of 
San Marino are now in New York and they 
expect to sail the last of the month for Eu- 
rope. They will spend most of the time in 
Paris and will return to Los Angeles in Oc- 
tober. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John J. Wirtner are ex- 
pecting the arrival from the Orient of their 
son-in-law and grandson, Mr. Herbert Jen- 
sen and his three-months-old son, who are 
due in San Francisco on July 27. It is a sad 
homecoming for the young father, who was 
bringing his wife home for the first time since 
their marriage in Shanghai two years ago 
and was also bringing their little son. Young 
Mrs. Jensen, who was Miss Jean Wirtner. 
died suddenly the eve of sailing. 

— Colonel and Mrs. Thomas Driscoll and 
their sons, Thomas Driscoll Jr. and Lorimer 



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Driscoll, are established for the summer at 
one of the houses belonging to Miss Cor- 
nelia Kempff in Santa Barbara. Their place 
adjoins that of Mrs. Driscoll's parents, Ad- 
miral and Mrs. Albert Bacon. 

— Mrs. Walter Hobart, accompanied by 
Miss Ysabel Chase, will leave toward the 
end of the month for the Hobart ranch in 
Nevada. 

— Horace Blanchard Chase Jr. sailed for 
Europe early in the summer, after having 
passed the winter and spring at Palm Beach. 
He is at present touring Italy. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Hussey are en- 
joying a visit at Banff and Lake Louise, 
having motored north several weeks ago. 
They plan to be away for two or three 
months. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Ford are en route 
from Australia to this city, having been away 
almost a year. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. 0. G. Miller "and their 
son, Albert, have arrived in London, where 
they will remain a few weeks before going 
to the continent. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor, 
accompanied by their niece, Miss Jean Boyd, 
left for the North on Sunday last. They plan 
to join Mrs. Taylor's sister, Mrs. Allen Lewis, 
in Portland and will proceed north to Can 
ada. Upon their return in several weeks, 
Mr. and Mrs. Taylor will join the Robert 
Oxnards at Feather River. 

— Commander and Mrs. Lyman K. Swen- 
sen have taken an apartment at the Hill- 
crest for the winter. 

At Del Monte 

— The next big golfing event which is 
attracting attention of players in the West 
is the California Amateur Championship, 
which has been set for the Del Monte and 
Pebble Beach courses on September 2 to 10. 
It is a bit early to be taking up the stellar 
links' feature of the season, but already there 
is an army of players going over the two 
Monterey courses with their eyes fixed on 
the championship. During the summer 
months every golfer who can find the time 
and opportunity will be playing the Del Monte 
and Pebble Beach courses in order to be- 
come acquainted with the alterations and 
changes that have been made. 

— Prominent society folk of San Fran- 
cisco and vicinity who are at Del Monte are: 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis De Cebrian. Mrs. H. N. 
Wright, Mr. and Mrs. Arnold C. Lackenbach, 
William F. Humphrey. Mr. and Mrs. Herbert 
Fleischhacker. 

— Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Boiset, formerly of 
Chicago and now of Pasadena, are at Del 
Monte to make a month's visit. They spend 
much of their time with their daughter, Mrs. 
Byington Ford, whose new home at Pebble 
Beach will soon be completed. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Cadwallader of 
Menlo Park are at Del Monte to make an 
extended stay. 

— Judge and Mrs Max C. Sloss and their 
young son, Frank, are spending their vaca- 
tion at the Hotel Del Monte. 

Baggs — I'm worried. My girl is running 
around with that new doctor in town. 
Jaggs — Feed her an apple a day. 



Our Reputation 

1'ir' being strictly reliable is our mosi 
valuable asset. We have been established 
riir over ;t third of ;i century and in all 
that time it lias been our earnest endea- 
vor in have each ami everj transaction 
entirety satisfactory. 

W. D. Fennlmore A. It. Fennimore 

J. W. Davis 




San Francisco - 181 Post, 2508 Mission Sts. 
Berkeley - 2106 Shattuck Avenue 

Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 



BABYLON 

On the Bay at San Carlos 



The most unique and exclusive re- 
sort for motorists on the Coast 
Babylon's Chicken Maryland 

or Duck Dinners $2.50 

Breaktasts and Lunches at 

Reasonable Prices 

SMusic and "Dancing Every Night 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eyebrows arched and moles, warts and 
superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest improved multiple needle ma- 
chine. Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary Street. Suite 723 Whitney Bid*. 

Phone Douglas 5232 

Oakland, Suite 424, First Vail. Bank Bldgr. 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

Make Your Reservations 
at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 
Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

• • • • • • 
PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

• • • • • • 
JEWELS In Platinum 

• • • • • • 
REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

• • • • • ■ 

UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

• • • • ■ • 

FINE JEWELRY Of Ail Descriptions 



EXPERT 



Repair Work 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary PoMi* 
Insiir.-incr Broker 

20K IRIHKER BUILDING 
Bite Palace Hotel 
Ilione Kearny 391 San Francisco 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 22, 1922 





LFlNflNOAV 




By P. N. BERINGER 



THE situation in Europe is very disquiet- 
ing, although it is not so bad as it was 
last week. The Germans seem to be mark- 
ing time ana looking for some opportunity to 
get out of paying reparation losses at the 
present tin.e. The internal money as well 
as the political situation in Germany is bad. 
The monarchists are still quite strong in the 
country and their aim is to destroy what- 
ever good impression the republicans may 
have made in the minds of the people. Mon- 
archism is synonimous with militarism, and 
the monarchists are determined they will 

never let the people forget this. 

* * * 

The German mark is racing to reach a 
point in valuelessness with the Russian 
rouble. The money situation is therefore 
most alarming to those who now stand at the 
helm in Germany. This money situation must 
have immediate attention and the mark must 
be strengthened and the downward trend in 
value must be stopped or Germany will find 
itself torn into fragments by a red revolu- 
tionary element on the one hand, and the 
monarchists on the other. The reds and the 
monarchists are now aiming at the same ob- 
jective — the demolition of the republic. 

Irish conditions are improving and the 
Free State is beginning to assert itself as the 
governing power in the land. De Valera is 
still abroad and is said to be the governing 
factor dominating in the affairs of the so- 
called republicans in their raids and pillag- 
ings and murders. It is only a question of 
time when an energetic government will cap- 
ture Mr. de Valera and put him in some 
place of safety for a number of years. Men- 
tion is made of this condition in Ireland be- 
cause until the Irish compose their differ- 
ences the internal row in the Free State will 
have a very evident effect in preventing the 
return of world prosperity. 

* * * 

And it is so also with Egypt, Mesopo- 
tamia, Turkey, India and China. These coun- 
tries are all of them still quite effective in 
preventing that return of world prosperity 
all are hopefully waiting for. Egypt is 
quieting down. Mesopotamia and Turkey 
are smoldering centers of protest, ready to 
flame into war at any moment. Turkey is 
seething with strife, which breaks out here 
and there at stated periods and wreaks havoc 
in every direction. India seems to have set- 
tled down to making a study of some peace- 
ful way of arriving at results but the situa- 
tion there is far from satisfactory. China 
is enjoying a period of internal war and it 
is very difficult to say when China will be 
at peace with itself. 

* * * 

Thirty steam vessels in and out of the 



harbor of San Francisco on last Saturday 
is quite a good showing, but it should be 
made three times that number. Our docks 
were not half busy and are not half busy 
two-thirds of the time. We need foreign 
trade to make this one of the greatest ports 
in the world. We have the facilities to han- 
dle the trade, we have the deep water fron- 
tage and we have the back country and the 
trans-continental lines, but our people do 
not seem to be aware of the fact that, while 
we may be pardoned for bragging about 
"thirty ships in one day," we should be brag- 
ging about ninety to a hundred in the same 
length of time. And it is plainly the fault 
of the people themselves because they could 
easily make this a really great port. 

The war is on in other directions as to 
rates and there is a very general cut being 
made in trans-Pacific freight costs. It has 
been said, for a long time, that freight rate 
cuts across the big pond were being made 
but there was not much evidence of this as 
a fact. Not that there is much evidence at 
present, but we hear a great deal of talk of 
this being so. The trans-Pacific trade is not 
a paying business, according to those who 
operate vessels. This makes it difficult for 
us to see where any advantage may be found, 
now or hereafter, in the cutting of rates. 

The building record of San Francisco, and 
in fact of the whole bay district, is gratify- 
ing to a degree. This is made so by the 
large number of. business blocks going up and 
by the many residences that are being 
erected. It is especially gratifying, too, if 
it is taken in consideration that, were it not 
for the very foolish idea that labor prices 
and materials will come down quite sensibly 
in the near future, there would be a great 
deal more of the construction work of all 
kinds going on. Despite this prevalent no- 
tion the work that has been done and is in 



contemplation is a record-breaking total. 

Grass Valley has carried out the promise 
made for that region in the mining world 
of a very busy season this year. There has 
been activity in every direction and that ac- 
tivity is increasing daily. 

We of San Francisco have been accused, 
as a people, of bragging too much. The fact 
is we do not brag enough and we do not, 
most of us, know the things we have that 
we should brag about. Bragging or boasting 
may easily be translated into a community 
spirit and that is what makes communi- 
ties grow in a healthy sort of way. We 
want new settlers and new industries and 
there is no reason why we should not tell 
the world all about ourselves and our coun- 
try so that those who may be discontented 
elsewhere may know just what we have to 
offer. The San Francisco News Letter is 
convinced that we do not brag enough and 
that bragging in concert about any one thing 
or several things is a very good way of 
spreading the blessings of San Francisco 
publicity to the four quarters of the globe. 

And Nevada has not been idle. All Gold- 
field leases are reported in a very healthy 
condition. The Silver Pick is shipping from 
$4000 to $5000 every week to the Tonopah 
Belmont mill. High grade milling ore is 
continuing to develop steadily in this mine. 
Work on the fourth level is claiming the at- 
tention of the miners in Goldfield who have 
been watching the development of the Silver 
Pick lease with a great deal more than or- 
dinary interest. The vein here shows every 
promise of going much deeper and the slope 
is still advancing above the third level in 
shipping ore. 

A condition exists in regard to many Ne- 
vada mining shares, that have undoubted 
value based on production, which is akin 
to what is ordinarily called "frozen credits." 
Much of the stock of such concerns was sold 
to the present holders at what was a much 
higher price than the same stock may now 
be had for and this stock will not show 
anything like an activity in the shares mar- 
ket until such time as the value of the shares 
will have been established by a slow and 
laborious climb to the position held in for- 
mer boom times. 



JAMES A. COLEMAN 

Announces the opening of offices in the 
CLUNIE BUILDING 
Southwest corner Montgomery and California Streets 
San Francisco, Cal. Phone Sutter 6325 

where he is prepared to consult with those requiring 
expert adivce in 

ESTATE TAX CASES 

Specializing in problems relating to transfers and to questions 
arising from the Community Property Laws 

INCOME TAX CAPITAL STOCK TAX 

General Federal Tax Work 



July 22. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



15 



VISIT 

"The 

ata c©mbs' 

AT 

:ypres5 lawn 
cemetery 

City Oii ico' 
0,9i5 Market St 
"ran else© 



PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 477 2 



For Sale 



Sixty-acre almond orchard. Trees 
six years old. 3 500 Thompson 
Seedless Grapes, 1 to 4 years old, 
between trees. Olive trees on three 
sides. Well, centrifugal pump, gas 
motor, tank house, water tank, and 
small cabin. 

Ranch of 20 acres, well improved; 
17 acres in good stand of alfalfa. 
Family orchard; fruit, berries and 
nuts. 9 first-class milch cows, dairy 
utensils, 4 doz. hens, 1 horse, wagon, 
mower and rake. 

272 acres fine farm land, fruit or 
alfalfa. Good improvements. Nicely 
located. 



JOHNSTON & CRITESER 

326 Cull BIdg., Smi Francisco 

Phone: Douglas 4456 



BELVEDERE 

Rent or Sell — Attractive Home 
Eight Rooms. Two Baths. Furnished 

SAN GERONTMO 

Delightful Home, Furnished — Six rooms. 
two baths, "iii ivory finish throughout; 
stream, rustic bridges. Hedwoods. 
APPLY DR. R. \V. HAINES 

DoUfflM ''433 323 Coury St.. Sun Irnnrisro 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



The Unusual Triumph 

The Byron Times is a phenomenally good 
newspaper and it does things in the publish- 
ing line in a phenomenal way. For years it 
has printed an annual edition de luxe and 
this, the eighth year of this publication, is 
no exception in magnificence of production, 
in its beautifully illuminated cover and its 
214 pages of printed matter. Typograph- 
ically it leaves nothing to be desired. It is 
just what it has been called, an edition 
de luxe and it becomes a tribute to its pub- 
lishers on account of the business secured 
and the perfect way in which it is printed 
and published. 



Off to the Convention 

A. F. Cosgrove has been made a delegate 
to the National Hairdressers' Convention and 
together with Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove, who is 
secretary of the national organization, will, 
while away, look into all things that are of 
interest regarding hair dressing, including 
the new method of the "permanent wave," 
as well as the dyeing of hair, which is so 
important and which has come to be much 
the vogue. Mr. and Mrs. Cosgrove are of 
the Cosgrove's Hair Store, at 360 Geary 
street. 



A Fine Luncheon 

The Fairmont Hotel is making a specialty 
of its grill luncheon and this is being ap- 
preciated by those who are lovers of the 
good things to eat. There is nothing quite 
so restful as this luncheon. Mind and body 
find refreshment in the quiet atmosphere of 
the beautiful hotel so near the noise and 
bustle of the city and yet as far removed 
as though the city did not really exist. The 
Fairmont Hotel is only five minutes' ride 
from the down town district. 



When on his way to evening service the 
new minister of the village met a rising 
young man of the place whom he was anx- 
ious to interest in the church. 

"Good evening, my young friend," he said 
solemnly, "do you ever attend a place of 
worship?" 

"Yes, indeed, sir, every Sunday night," 
replied the young fellow with a smile. "I'm 
on my way to see her now." — Sunday \ isi- 
tor. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 



(25 years in business) Kearny 2842 

ENJOY YOUR VACATION BY 
HAVING YOUR 

HAIR PERMANENTLY 
WAVED 

—at— 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

360 Geary Street 
San Francisco 

We consider the health fo your hair. 
Mr. J. and Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter. Just Out 

353 Bash Street 
Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 



Fire, Earthquake, Automobile, Use and Occupancy, Riot and Civil Commotion, Explosion, 
Plate Glass, Fidelity and Surety Bond 

INSURANCE 



THE LONDON & LANCASHIRE INSURANCE CO., Ltd. 

I OMiilN, i:\t.I \\1> Incorporated 1861 

ORIENT Insurance Co. of Hartford, Conn. LAW UNION & ROCK Insurance Co., Ltd. 

lnror|<< ruled 18G7 Of London — Founded 1806 

LONDON & LANCASHIRE INDEMNITY COMPANY of America 

Oriraniieri umler the Ian* of the State of New York — Incorporated January. 1915 

Pacific Department: 332 Pine Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
Geo. Ormond Smith, Manager 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 22, 1922 




PIyE>ASURE>S WAND 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Portola 

The fact that this week the houses are 
well attended is not due to the free admis- 
sion of red-headed ladies. Alice Brady's old 
success, "Red Head," has been revived for 
a short run and is drawing excellent atten- 
dance. She is supported by Conrad Nagel, 
and the diiection happens to compare fav- 
orably with that of current offerings and 
there are other features about it which well 
merit a second showing. On the same bill 
are comedy and short reel attractions as well 
as interesting musical selections. 



Strand 

Harold Lloyd's first big feature, "Grand- 
ma's Boy," is given its San Francisco show- 
ing this week. While the start is rather long 
drawn out for a farcial film, there is enough 
life to the latter part to make up for it. 
New stunts abound, action galore is offered 
when the piece really warms up and in ad- 
dition there is a pretty heroine to reward 
the timid chap at the end. By the roars of 
laughter that fill the theater at frequent in- 
tervals one easily believes in the tales of 
long runs in other cities. The balance of 
the program is composed of a filmed version 
of a Kipling poem, good music and Fitz- 
patrick and the usual Mutt and Jeff cartoon 
and short current topics. 



California 

"The Crossroads of New York" is a melo- 
drama made of all the good old materials 
that have been used for melodramatic pur- 
poses ever since your critic can remember 
(and that's a long time, my children), and 
always have they been relished by the play- 
goer. Here we have the country boy, the 
mortgaged farm, the city temptations, the 
heroine in distress, the naughty alluring ac- 
tress with the evil optic, the rich uncle who 
made a will, the Wall street excitement — oh, 
it's all there, and a lot more. A happy end- 
ing, of course. These time-honored tools are 
handled cleverly by a notable cast of players, 
and the burlesquing is well done throughout. 
With such actors as George O'Hara, Noah 
Beery, Herbert Standing, James Finlaysson 
and Robert Cain, the play is in trustworthy 
hands. The feminine roles are not so well 
supported. Seven's orchestra continues to 
delight California audiences. 



Granada 

Eight units make up the great Granada 
square this week, and the eightest of these 
is "The Top of New York," with May Mc- 
Avoy, Mary Jane Irving, Walter McGrail and 
many others in the cast to help it over the 
top. This, they say, is the work upon which 
poor W. D. Taylor was engaged when he met 
his tragic death, and it is indeed a credit to 
that clever brain. To take these units in 
their turn, we begin with a march played by 
Paul Ash's jazz orchestra; a mighty march. 
Unit two is the news film, always by far the 
finest unit of them all. Three, the organist, 



Wallace, makes a tuneful one on the organ, 
although both his selections were unsuitable 
to that noble instrument. Four is a Christie 
comedy called "Mile a Minute Mary," with 
Dorothy Devore galloping through it. For 
five we have the great Paul Ash himself and 
his players "offering" a first-rate program, 
which was eagerly "accepted" by his hear- 
ers. The Pathe Review was number six, for 
which Jack Parkington is to be praised, and 
seven is the "Doll's House," under the di- 
rection of Miss Wright. 



Imperial 

A trite enough story, but embellished with 
a wealth of detail and uncommonly well 
acted, "Beauty's Worth" makes a good play 
for Marion Davies, who with her appealing 
blonde beauty and altogether irresistable 
blue eyes, charm her way through the flimsy 
plot about the innocent little Quaker girl 
and the highly accomplished pantomimist and 
the happy mate of the artist hero. All are 
the same girl, but such remarkable things 
happen in the movies that we are not even 
faintly astonished at this flexibility of char- 
acter on the part of "Prudence Cole." We 
accept the goods the gods (and the plausible 
producers* provide; ours not to wonder why, 
ours not to sit and guy, ours is to let 'em get 
by— noble flimflammers! Forrest Stanley is 
a rich and gifted artist in this pleasant drama 
of unreal life; he wears that gently bored 
manner of the leading man, and a somewhat 
sad hair-fix. The old-time favorite Lydia 
Yeaman gives a good performance of the 
Quaker maid-servant taking gin for a cold. 
One missed that rich, rolling Irish voice of 
hers that has made so many friends for her 
in little old New York. Hallam Cooley is 
precisely and to perfection the exact type 
of young man most abominated by this 
writer — so let us not mention Hallam Cooley. 
Truly Shattuck gave an excellent portrayal 
of a conventional society lady, mother of 
that unfortunate Cooley person, who fails 
to win our admiration. The rest of the cast 
is made up of well-known names, among 
them that of Thomas Jefferson, a weirdly 
thin man painfully resembling our beloved 
Joseph Jefferson in some facial expressions. 
Prior s orchestra renders one piece of music 
and two pieces of jazz. Monte Banks dis- 
plays a tedious comedy. The screen news 
shows interesting happenings all over the 
world. And next week Mae Murray and 
Rudolph Valentino are coming to the Im- 
perial in "The Delicious Little Devil." I 
know one person who will be there in good 
time for the very first showing. Never you 
mind whether it's Rudolph or Mae that's 
the magnet. 



Pacific Players 

As an added attraction to the plays an- 
nounced last week to be presented July 28, 
Oliver Alberti has been engaged to assist 
in the entertainment. This violinist is well 
regarded locally, having been in various en- 



sembles for a considerable time. There has 
been a lot of conscientious work going on 
lately at the Bush street studio and an even 
better evening than the last one is antici- 
pated. 



Alcazar 

"Nightie Night" is another domestic 
scramble with a lot of laughs, very little plot 
but plenty of action and consequentive in- 
terest. Gladys George is at her best and 
Heyes gives indications that his stage train- 
ing of previous years is returning to gain 
the upper hand of his film studio digres- 
sion. More power to him. He has a pleas- 
ing personality and deserves our support for 
his continued improvement. 

There is nothing particular to be said 
about this comedy, except that a great deal 
of the objectionable that has been featured 
in previous attempts of this kind has been 
omitted. Possibly the fact that two girls 
wrote the lines has a bit to do with it. They 
have conceived a number of amusing situa- 
tions and some screaming complications, 
with a finish in accord with the desires of 
the patrons. Brady Kline is fine this time and 
others of the cast do creditably, making the 
show thoroughly a laughing success. 



Century 

"Abie's Irish Rose" continues to sail along 
on its triumphant way, playing to capacity 
houses. This is the third week and before it 
closes a large part of the humorously-in- 
clined should have taken advantage of the 
opportunity to enjoy two hours of solid 
laughs. Because the young man in the play 
has done the same stunt in real life seems 
to impress many with his bravery. At any 
rate, his acting is most acceptable and we 
hope to have a chance of seeing him in other 
parts before too long a time. Morosco has 
picked the whole cast with care and they 
make the most of their parts. 



Orpheum 

Edith Taliaferro appears in a playet called 
"Under the Same Old Moon" this week, a 
love tale of three continents. She is ably 
supported by Earl Brown, James Bysell and 



San FRAHC1SCO 



m NA\)0fc'«V\A.% 




J 

■ 

■ 

_■ 

MA ™ 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 35c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 

Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Loges 



July 22, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



17 



Guy Kibbee. Truly Shattuck and Emma 
O'Neill, two favorites in San Francisco, keep 
the house in an uproar with their humorous 
skit "Puncturing Life's Manuscript." The 
little play is a fast-moving and changeful one 
and affords vast entertainment to enthusiastic 
audiences at the Orpheum, where the really 
good things are always appreciated. Georgie 
and Cissie Sewall have a charming dance 
act with elaborate scenic effects. Margaret 
McKee is a musical whistler who can imitate 
the songs of birds. Richard Coburn, who 
wrote "Avalon" and many other melodies, 
appears on this bill with his jazz players. 
John Steel is here for another week, and 
his hearers seem never to hear enough of 
his delightful tenor voice in a well-selected 
repertoire. "Two Midnight Sons" are also 
staying over, and their act is worth seeing 
again. 



s 



unoe 



Alcazar 

Gladys George will say farewell as leading 
woman at the Alcazar theater and Ben Er- 
way and Florence Printy will also make their 
final appearances beginning next Sunday aft- 
ernoon, July 23, in "The Night Caller," a 
recent New York hit. As a medium for their 
last appearances, Belasco & Mayer have 
picked what is said to be one of the really 
startling plays of the season. 

Mystery dramas are all the vogue this 
year and the public has been so enthusiastic 
in its fondness for this type of stage produc- 
tion that the authors have been hard pressed 
to supply the demand. The Metropolitan 
critics were unanimous in their praises of 
the puzzling features of "The Night Caller," 
which is said to be a brilliant piece. 

The Alcazar will also introduce with this 
production Lovell Alice Taylor, who comes 
here with a great reputation as a character 
actress. She has never before appeared in 
San Francisco, but has supported some of 
the leading stars in this country. 

The leading role in "The Night Caller" 
will be taken by Herbert Heyes. 



Divine Familiarity 

A small South Carolina church recently 
called a new pastor, and on the occasion 
of his first sermon the negro janitor was 
an interested listener from the doorway of 
the building. The minister proved to be 
fluent, his sermon was eloquent, and in his 
prayers, which were loud and long, he 
seemed to cover the whole broad range of 
human needs. 

As the services ended and the congrega- 
tion was leaving, one of the deacons paused 
for a word with the janitor. 

"By the way, Joe," he said, "what do 
you think of the new minister? Don't you 
think he makes a wonderful prayer?" 

"Cap'n," the darkey answered, "Ah sut- 
tinly does. Why. dat man took an' axed 
de Lawd fo' things dat the last pahsan didn't 
even know He had." — Judge. 



Obliging 

Wife — Drunk again, Harry? You have 
broken the promise you made me. 

Hubby — Hie, n'ver mind, dear, 'sail ri'. 
I'll hie, make you 'nother one. 



Sportsman — Chudleigh is a good shot, 
isn't he? 

Second Sportsman — We were practicing 
with our guns the other day and he hit the 
bull's-eye the first time. 

"Very clever." 

"Yes; but he had to pay for the bull." — 
Answers (London). 



"Pa," said little Thomas Twobble, "what 
is prima facie evidence of guilt?" 

"Possessing a bottle-capping machine, my 
son, ' said Mr. Twobble — Birmingham Age- 
Herald. 



Sunday School Teacher — Will one of the 
little boys tell me who led the Children of 
Israel in Canaan? 

No reply. 

Teacher (sternly) — Little boy on the 
aisle seat, who led the Children of Israel into 
Canaan? 

Frightened Boy — It wasn't me, teacher. 
I just joined this Sunday. 



Lord Babbington was instructing the new 
colored servant in his duties, adding, "Now, 
Zeke, when I ring for you, you must answer 
me by saying, 'My lord, what will you 
have'?" 

A few hours afterwards, having occasion 
to summon the servant, his lordship was as- 
tonished with the following: 

"My Gawd, what does you want now?" 



"Won't you come and dine with us to- 
night?" asked the dear moneyed illiterate 
over the phone. And the very much man- 
about-town at the other end explained that 
he was sorry and all that — much as he would 
like to and so on — but fact was he was go- 
ing to see "Hamlet." But the voice at the 
source persisted with, "That's all right. Bring 
him along. You have such nice friends." 



They were a young married couple. John, 
for days, had been trying to teach his ner- 
vous little wife how to drive his new car. 

One fair afternoon they were out on a 
narrow little country road with the car and 
wifey managed to drive along nicely for a 
short distance. 

Suddenly, at the sight of a large tree 
looming up on the side of the road, she ex- 
claimed: "John, you take the car! Here 
comes a tree!" — Judge. 



Charity — Will you donate something to 
the Old Ladies' Home? 

Generosity — With pleasure. Help your- 
self to my mother-in-law. 



TAX EXPERT OPENS OFFICE 

James A. Coleman, for five years in charge 
of the division of the internal revenue office 
dealing with corporation taxes, has opened 
offices in the Clunie Building at California 
and Montgomery streets, as an advisor in 
Federal tax matters. His specialty is capital 
stock taxes, which he formerly passed on 
for the government, and income tax prob- 
lems involving community property laws, 
which are extremely complicated and vexa- 
tious in California. 



Customer — What are the least expensive 
calling cards you have? 

Stationery Clerk — A royal flush, madam. 



HOTEL PLATA 

SAU FRANCISCO 



DINING-ROCM 

Remodeled 

and newly opened 

to serve you 

Breakfast, 

Luncheon and 

Dinner 

at moderate prices 




Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Tapers ami Manuscript Covers 

••Mmle a Utile belter than seem* necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 

durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 

plain <-r marginal ruled. The manuscript 

: similar boxes containing one 

hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 

r or, if so desired, we will send a sam- 

ook showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



VACATION NOTICE 

Sub- 1 rilM-rs destrlnf the San Franri-i ■> New- I .etter forwarded 
lo their summer ftddrtM (iurine the vaeation period should 

raozrs DOl <.i \> Nil 

Or Write to tin 1 tlffire, SSB Montgomery Street No extra eharce for llii- »er*iee 

SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 22, 1922 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gough 
Telephone Park 271 



The Automobile 



The Whole Story ! 

"My gums are a hundred per cent 
better. Find enclosed $1.00 for an- 
other treatment." — Mrs. M. F. M., 
San Jose, Calif. 

Mrs. M. F. M. has been using 

PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's 
Home Treatment for 

Pyorrhea and Sore Gums 

Package with directions postpaid for 
$1.00 

Phone or write today 

DR. W. W. HO AG LAND 

908 Market St., San Francisco 

(Mention News Letter) 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. Leidesdorff 



Dr. Susan Harris Hamilton 

OSTEOPATH 
SPECIALIZING in NERVOUS DISEASES 
ST. PAUL BLDG. 291 GEARY ST. 

Hours — 10 a.m. to 12 m., 2 to 4 p.m. 

Phones — Douglas 226, Prospect 15 



A Classy Garage 

It has been but a year or so since J. W. 
Souther gave up the operation of the Souther 
Warehouse and Unloading Terminal. He's 
back in the game where he can again be 
called a "nurse for automobiles." 

At Post and Hyde streets is the De Luxe 
Garage, an "exclusive apartment house for 
automobiles," the newest, nattiest and neat- 
est garage and service station. Fire-proof 
building, unusually clean, cleverly equipped, 
light and airy, courteous chaps to greet you, 
and when it comes to servicing features, this 
new garage is sure a "humdinger." 

The specially constructed racks that turn 
a car over, exposing the real working parts 
of a machine; mechanics who remove all 
the dirt, grit and grime; tighten up all the 
bolts and nuts, replace worn or missing cot- 
ter pins, inspect all parts, oil and grease the 
most mysterious out of the way places, and 
in addition a weekly motor and battery in- 
spection, wheel alignment, adjustment of ig- 
nition points, etc., furnish a service for only 
a small monthly charge. 

The place is bound to be a success for the 
motorists of San Francisco are getting some- 
thing they have heretofore only dreamed 
about — real service and an all around weekly 
inspection at a nominal monthly cost. 



Big Automobile Combine 

An $80,000,000 consolidation of manu- 
facturers of automobiles, trucks and auto 
parts with factories in seven States, has been 
completed in Dayton, Ohio, under the name 
of the Associated Motor Industries. Will I. 
Ohmer of Dayton is chairman of the board. 
The merger includes seven automobile and 
tractor factories in addition to motor, body, 
gear, ignition and other part makers. Offices 
will be in Dayton. 

Other manufacturers of cars are being con- 
sidered in the consolidation and some addi- 
tions may be announced soon. Besides the 
manufacturing plants involved, five assem- 
bling plants will be operated in Indianapolis, 
Boston, Louisville, Oakland, Calif., and St. 
Louis. 

All the plants in the merger are owned 
outright by the consolidation, the titles be- 
ing turned over in fee simple to the corpora- 
tion. 



Los Angeles Fining Speeders 

Los Angeles is proceeding in savage style 
to dispose of speeders and seems as anxious 
to get the money as punish offenders. In 
one Sunday 4800 alleged speeders were ar- 
rested and fined from $5 up. One woman 
got thirty-five days in jail. The motor cops 
do not follow Los Angeles speeders, they 
watch and take the motorist's time between 
two measured points and anybody exceeding 
fifteen miles is made to contribute to the 
county treasurer. 



Bank Teller — I've left my combination at 
home. 

New Steno — Heavens! I'd think you'd 
be frozen without it. 




WE KNOW HOW 

Your car is piling up a big repair bill 
every mile you drive without proper 
lubrication. You can depend upon 

LOYAL AND EFFICIENT SERVICE 
at the 

DE LUXE GARAGE & SERVICE STATION 

Post and Hyde Sts. Phone Franklin 3 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Prank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Watch Your Feet 




Weak, fallen or broken arches reduce 
your efficiency, cause headache, back- 
ache, sciatica, pelvic and stomach trou- 
ble, as well as other ailments. 

THE POST SYSTEM 

for foot correction restores the flexi- 
bility and resilieflcy of the feet. 

The Post System for Foot Correction 
259 Geary Street, San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6147 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept., 1921 




.$ 25,000,000.00 
.. 17,500,000.00 



. 25,000,000.00 
.$ 67,500,000.00 



.$359,326,760.00 



OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

359 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, 

Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of 

Australasian Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents : 
Bank of Calif., National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bk., Crocker Nat'l Bk. 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1922 

Assets $76,170,177.18 

Deposits 72,470,177.18 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - - - 2,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund ----- 385,984.61 



A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4U ) per cent 
per annum was declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 

RECOMMENDS 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 6600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3 4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE rRRIGATlOX DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid t'p Capital Sl.'-.OOO.OOO Total toWta Over S479.000.000 J1.1. 000.000 Resrrrf Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

4S5 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK: 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 4 so CALIFORNIA STUEET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. .1. OOtTLTHARD, aaatstaal Manager 




N. w CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 
PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 
of Automobiles 



We Stand for the Best in Business 
Training 



Munson 




School 



For 
PRIVATE SECRETARIES 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 
Send for Catalog 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon ( 11 :SO to 2 p. m.) .... 75c 

Dinner, Week Days 91.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. .91.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



The Pageant-Drama 



"Serra" 




in the 

Forest Theater 

of 

CARMEL 

July 21-22-23 

$yl.95 ROUND 



■4- 



TRIP 



to Del Monte 

stage thence 

Tickets on sale July 21-22-23 

Return limit July 25, 1922 

TRAINS LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO 

(Third Street Station) 

8.00 A. M., 8:05 A. M., 9:00 A. M., 

2:00 P. M., 5:00 P. M. 

Our Agents Will Gladly Furnish You Further Information 

Southern Pacific Lines 

50 Post St Ferry Station Third St. Station 

Phone Sutter 4000 




The 

FASHIONABLE 
FASCINATING 
GAME OF 
THE SEASON 

Has all the lure of the 

Orient. 

oAll the charm of the Occident. 

A game as new and as old 

As the game of chance Cupid plays. 

Every hand has a Dew thrill. Learn this game 
of a thousand wonders. 

On sale al all leading stores. 

MAH-JONGG SALES CO. OF AMERICA 
112 Market St. 




rjotte approves °f 
'iciotiy taste <§ flavor 



fedelic iony taste 3 flavor 

©wells 



NATIONAL CREST 



(off 



1.800,000 cups were served 
atthe. PANAMA.- PACIFIC 
International EXPOSITION- 




Telephones 
Sutter 6654 — Oakland 1017 



Casa Del Rey 



SANTA CRUZ 



CALIFORNIA 



The ^Million 'Dollar Fireproof Hotel 



THE ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm 
beach bathing; dancing; good music; artistic, home-like 
spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful 
playgrounds; sanitary warm bathing pool; swimming 
instructors; saddle ponies for children. Special kitchen- 
ette in hotel proper where maid can prepare food for 
young children. 

Complete highways, through the most beautiful sec- 
tion of California. (Only SO miles.) The Southern Pa- 
cific offers unusually low rates from all California points; 
the warmest and most accessible beach out of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also 
under the same management as Casa Del Rey. 

Correspondence about rates for families with maids 
and children solicited. Special rates by the week or for 
extended stays of a month or two. Address: 



CASA DEL REY : : SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 

MORRIS & WARNER, Proprietors. Phor/e 600 







™>,.«n, TAX pAYERS WE eklY $500PERYEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1922 



— — ■ 
LOS ANGELES 




EARLY SAN FRANCISCO (No. 16) 
Photograph Taken From Russian Hill. Showing Marin Shore in the Distance 





RESPONSIBILITY 

From the quarry 
where the rough gran- 
ite is hewn, throu gh 
the processes of drill- 
ing, cutting, sawing, 
carving and polishing, 
to the final assembly 
and fabrication into 
the Memorial, one 
organization demon- 
strates by consistent 
success the value of 
this single responsi- 
bility for design, man- 
ufacture and installa- 
tion. 

One standard, there- 
fore, governs the de- 
sign and manufacture 
of the materials as 
well as the engineer- 
ing and construction 
service. 

Booklet "DN" on 

Memorials sent on 

request 



Raymond Granite Company, Inc. 

CONTRACTORS 

GRANITE — STONE — BUILDING — MEMORIAL 

S Potrero Avenue, San Francisco 1350 Palmetto Street, Los Angeles 



£>mx Jtomrisrn (EiftomxU 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 

A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



Best Equipped and Most MODERN 
GARAGE West of Chicago 

The Century 



Two Blocks from Union Square 

675 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Between Taylor and Jones 



Independent Buyers' League 

furnishes its MEMBERS with 
ANYTHING sold at whole- 
sale at wholesale prices. 
Be a Member 

Independent Buyers' League 

833 Market St., Room 902 

Pbonea Douglas 1203-1204 



Eyes 

Bother 

You? 



Guaranteed 
O^CD Work at 

27 7th St. 

DR. J. P. JCHL 



FOB EXCEPTIONAL FOOD AT 
REASONABLE PRICES 

UNITED SERVICE 
RESTAURANTS 

and BAKERY 

UNIQUE SERVICE 

At Table or Counter 

Attractive Fitting. 

Comfortable Surroundings 

NO TIPS 

22-26 CALIFORNIA STREET 

A Block from the Ferry 

TURK AND TAYLOR STREETS 

A Block from Market Street 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3410 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



GUARANTEE 
BATTERY CO. 

Master 
Automobile Electricians 

— and — 



Made 
In 

California 




055-975 POST STREET 
San Francisco, California 



NOTICE 
In the Superior Court or the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. 

In the matter of the application of the San Fran- 
cisco News Letter and California Advertiser, 
to be declared a newspaper of general cir- 
culation under the provisions of section 4460 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Notice is hereby given that Frederick Marriott 
has filed in the above entitled court a petition 
alleging that the San Francisco News Letter and 
California Advertiser, is and ever since July 
20, 1856. has been a newspaper established, 
printed and published at regular intervals, 
namely, on each Saturday, excepting the Sat- 
urday following the great Are of April 18, 1906, 
for the dissemination of local and telegraphic 
news and intelligence of general character and 
having a bonafide subscription list of paying 
subscribers, and that it has been declared to be 
a newspaper of general circulation by decree 
of the above entitled court given in or about 
the year 1880, but that the records thereof have 
been destroyed and asking that it be adjudged 
and decreed to be a newspaper of general cir- 
culation within the provision of section 44 60 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Said order will be applied for before Depart- 
ment No. 1 of the above entitled court 
upon Tuesday, September 2, 1922, at the hour 
of 10 a. m. at which time and place any person 
interested may appear and show cause If any 
they have why said petition should not be 
granted. 
Dated June 28. 1922. 

FREDERICK MARRIOTT. 
C. F. Adams, Attorney at Law, 703 Market St. 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

"SULPHO" 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
Ihe new HEX EON 
process. . 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Quality 1866—56 Years— 1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burllngame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodnlde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 016 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 








Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 



VOL. CI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1922 



No. 4 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— The State of California is pulling for Moore, Moore and Moore. 

— First it was a B. B. button. Now it's "up the pole" a Big Bear 
flag. 

— Birds of a feather flock together. A vote for Johnson is a vote 
for Hearst. 

— If you have not registered, you are not entitled to crab about 
the government. 

— Mother says to child: Keep still. So does bootlegger to revenue 
agent when he's caught. 

— There are many reasons why Moore should be elected Senator. 
Then again Mr. Moore is a gentleman. 

— The Prohibit Everything Club at their last meeting are devising 
ways and means of censoring the radio. 

— Yes the bay will be bridged sometime. Scientists figure the 
world is good for another hundred million years. 

— Riddle: What is it when you take away the noise leaves noth- 
ing. Answer: Well you know who wants to be re-elected. 

* * * 

—Where, Oh Where Is Our Foreign Trade Gone? Oh Where, Oh 

Where Can It Be? International title for new jazz song. 

* * * 

—The $500,000,000 power bill will be defeated. There are other 

ways of going crazy without spending this much to prove it. 

* * * 

— Dry agents claim U. S. will be dry in twenty-five years. Thank 
goodness, there will still be time to parch the unquenched thirst. 

* * * 

— Week-end fatalities in auto crashes are increasing. The Grim 
Reaper's greatest ally is "Give her the gas, we can make it." They 

don't. 

* * * 

— Andy Gallagher claims broken election pledges because the 
city did not spend all the money where he told them. Give them 
a chance, Andy, the city limits do not run South of Market street 
only. 



— The Standard Oil is reducing the price of crude oil and other 
products. We hear no vociferous protests against this terrible mo- 
nopoly. 

— Johnson is going to have his hands full when his speechmaking 
commences. "I'm for Hiram" is now replaced by the slogan, "Me 
undt Heardst." 

— If the Board of Supervisors could move some of their meetings 
to the Hetch Hetchy valley. Eut what have the poor mountains done 
to wish it on them. 

— Somebody says that a sonata is played on a piano and a 
symphony by an orchestra, and that is the difference. No the dif- 
ference is usually $50,000. 

— England has been asked to aid U. S. dry agents in Bermuda 
and Bahamas. Imagine John Bull 'elping somebody to stop 'is beer 
supply. E opes e chokes first. 

— We notice Johnson's supporters trying to prove that Harding 
did not endorse C. C. Moore. Maybe. But we don't notice Hard- 
ing breaking his neck to get in line for Hiram. 

— Union miners dynamited open shop workers' homes. What 
a howl to the Gods of Olympus if the shoe was on the other foot. 
Does not union labor see the handwriting on the wall? 

* * * 

— Local newspapers announce radio service to tell the fans what 
they think about local theatrical attractions. Would like a service 
to tell some of the attractions what the fans think about them. 

— And now we have one dry agent who is held for murder. Agents 

of that kind have been held for about every crime in the catalog 

and one to be held for murder will make little difference, except to 

complete the list. 

¥ * * 

— The object of extending the municipal car lines is said to be 
to enable the company to raice its fares. The Supervisors are show- 
ing us great consideration. Why not raise them without making 
the extensions? Why so punctilious? 

* * » 

— A boy walks from Montana to California to find his lost dad 
and locates him in Vallejo. The question naturally arising is what 
was the dad doing all this time to locate the enterprising boy? And 
is the dad worth the boy's shoe leather? 

— Secretary Denby is on his way home, after some thrilling ex- 
periences in the air and on the earth while away. He has discovered 
several ways of making office holding a pleasure and one of them 
is to tumble through the air in a falling plane. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 29, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




There is in reality no good reason why there 
Delays Are Dangerous should be any further delay by the authorities 

at Washington and the authorities of the 
States in the matter of the rail and coal strikes. The time has come 
when such delays are markedly dangerous and the people should not 
be made to suffer because of timorousness on the part of those who 
are in office and who should consider it their duty to act at once 
and effectually to break the embargo laid upon us all through the 
calling of these strikes. Firmness in purpose and quick action is 
what is needed. If it has become necessary for the Washington gov- 
ernment to take advantage of the laws that have been passed making 
ihe thing possible, then Washington should act at once regardless 
cf the States' authority and take possession of the mines and the 
rail lines and operate them, through conscription, if that is necessary, 
and keep on operating them until such time as the offenders, em- 
ployers and employed, are ready to obey the decree of the railway 
labor board. That is what the government is for and it should see 
to it that it functions as it was designed to function. 



Here is a man who is willing to immolate 
The Kansas City Editor himself in order to establish a principle 

and in his desire to establish this princi- 
ple he is willing also that all kinds of laws shall be broken and that 
ell kinds of people shall suffer in his company. The probability is 
the editor is quite right in his contention as to the existence of the 
principle which he claims is involved and he may be right, too, in 
his claim that this principle has been fractured to bits. The real 
question at issue is whether the editor can square his conscience 
with the fact that, in his attempt to protect this principle, he has 
not made a very bad matter much worse than it was before his 
attempt to immolate himself on the altar of his convictions. In 
ether words, we have to consider what will innure to the greatest 
good to the larger number of people in the country and whether 
there are not other principles of so much greater practical value to 
his fellow citizens than that which the editor considers of such para- 
rr.ont importance to himself and to a proper consideration, in his 
ectimation, of the great questions at issue. If events shape themselves 
true to the usual form the editor will have availed himself nothing, 
in the final analysis, and will have caused a great deal of harm 
to those who are unthinking and unbaked. 



Senator Shortridge has surprised his 
Shot-fridge for Vice President friends and his enemies by the show- 
ing of great ability since his advent 
in Washington. He has given his attention to business with an en- 
thusiasm and tenacity that has won him admirers among those who 
in former times did not know him at all. Here at home this show- 
ing of capacity has earned him new supporters. This increased 
pcpularity has worked in another direction, too, and now comes 
the proposal that he be made the running mate of Harding on the 
next national Republican ticket, as vice presidential nominee. We 
second the nomination with pleasure, and no better man could be 
named for the office. It is the custom of Americans to believe that 
the office of the vice presidency does not bring any honor or work 
to the wearer of the title. This is not true. In the first place too 
much care could not be taken in the selection of the man for this 
place because of the danger there would be, should anything happen 
to the President, in bringing a man of no capacity, of mediocre 
alility in the office as chief magistrate. The vice president has 
plenty and enough to do while in office and is kept quite busy, 
providing he has a conscientious regard as to the duty he owes the 



public who placed him where he is as a servant. Senator Shortridge 
is in every way fitted for the gift of this office from the people. 



There are those of us who are still at war with Ger- 
Still at War many. Now, that isn't at all surprising.except to the 

Germans. And many of us will remain at war against 
the Teutonic nation until we are convinced that Germany aims to and 
will do everything that is right in reparations and in winning back 
the esteem she formerly held in all parts of the civilized world. That 
isn't exactly what we are aiming at right now. We know and you 
all know that there are in this country vast numbers of people who 
are still waging the war of the revolution against England. It is a 
question when the time will come that these good Americans will 
realize that George the Third is really dead and that this is a na- 
tion having no real grievances as to Great Britain. Recently there 
has grown a feeling against this country in Canada and a small 
faction of Canadians believe it the intention of this country to come 
up there sometime when they are not looking or sleeping and take 
their beautiful country away from them. Still more recently there 
has grown a feeling in Australia that this country is needing a "tak- 
ing down" and that we should be made to realize the fact that dol- 
lars are not everything in this world. Indeed, some of the Australian 
writers have grown wrathy about it and it will undoubtedly surprise 
most Americans to read what a Sydney Bulletin correspondent thinks 
of us. H. Compton Ford winds up a very long denunciation of this 
country with a really biting tone to it, which we believe we need 
not apologize for inflicting on our readers one paragraph, as it gives 
them an opportunity of seeing themselves as others see them. The 
question arises for the Australians to answer to us: "Why and where 
do you get that stuff?" Mr. Ford says that Uncle Sam is utterly 
changed from the aquilline featured old gentleman to a round faced 
dollar chaser. 

"Meanwhile, it is an awesome thing to think of this vast space 
and the tiny fraction of consciousness spread out over it to stabalize 
and control. The round-faced one, for all his vanity, is beginning 
to be perturbed by his position: he senses something maleficent in 
the abyss over which he celebrates the Fourth of July. How may 
he be saved? Not by adding to his obscene collection of money- 
scalps; not by the primitive antics of a barbarian Billy Sunday; 
not by lip-service to laws which he set at naught by periodical mass- 
yieldings to the blood-lust; and certainly not by his special brands of 
Puritanism which express nothing so much as a descent towards 
the animal. Yet these, despite his apologists in Australia and else- 
where, constitute the nation's outstanding features, and they unite 
to make our be-lauded Uncle Sam one of the most formidable 
menaces that the civilized world has to face today." 



This question is one in which we are 
The Motor and the Rail Lines all interested and we should give it 

the most careful consideration. The 
motor bus and freight lines have practically killed business, in many 
parts of the country, for the railroad within a radius of one hun- 
dred miles, and some more, about big cities. The bus lines are 
being merged and they are taking care of passenger traffic in a 
most remarkable degree. That is not what we are so much inter- 
ested in, however. We are most vitally interested in the direction 
that this development touches our pockets through an increase in 
taxation. The motor bus and freight carrying motors make use of 
the streets and roads, furnished by the taxpayers and they use these 
roads to such an extent that they are fast becoming destroyers of 
these highways. For this reason some form of taxation should be 



July 29. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



adopted that will place upon these carriers the burden of carrying 
the largest proportion of taxation made incidental by such use. In 
some localities it is being suggested that separate roadways be built 
for the exclusive use of freight and automobile bus lines in caring 
for their increasing patronage. These roads would be built and 
maintained out of taxes levied against those making use of them. 
Such a road is imperatively necessary down the peninsula from San 
Francisco, and indeed it will be but a very short time before a road 
of this character will be found necessary from San Francisco to 
Los Angeles. The rail lines have thoroughfares of their own which 
they are forced to maintain out of the profits they may derive from 
running their business. The bus and freight carrying motor lines 
should be made to stand their proper share of the cost of mainten- 
ance of the public highways, which they, to a much larger extent 
than any other traffic, help to destroy. Could there be anything more 
just than these motor lines be made to build and maintain their own 
lines of road, upon which they might maintain any rate of speed 
compatible with the safety to life and limb of their passengers? 



Those employers who have flouted the decree 
Disobedient Employers of the Railroad Labor Board should be haled 

before some kind of a tribunal and made to 
toe the mark without any further delay. They can be reached at 
once and there is no reason why time should be wasted, waiting to 
bring labor into line. If, as has been said, the government is power- 
less in enforcing the decrees of any of the branches of the Federal 
government, then those in Washington having the making of our 
laws in their hands should proceed at once to the task of putting 
teeth into the laws, good, sound, wholesome biting teeth. In the 
final analysis this government of ours is always found to be a peo- 
ple's government and it is not and it has never been the intent 
of the people there should be a favoritism shown one class at 
the expense of the other. Let the disobedient employers be punished 
and the quicker the better. 



The value of one system of street cars 
The Value of One System must be apparent to anyone who has 

given this any thought at all. Today the 
municipal system authorities are contemplating the extension of lines 
into territory which is said to be sure to prove unprofitable. It 
would certainly seem a more business-like proposition for those who 
have the destinies of the municipal system in their hands to strengthen 
it by the purchase of its competitor and the unification process might 
be continued physically and connection made which would render 
the one system most valuable to city as an income producer. 



The proposal is made in Ohio 
Reduce the Taxes on Automobiles to tax those who use gasoline 

according to the amount of gas- 
oline used by them during the year. This method of taxation is to 
raise a fund for road building and maintenance. It is the proposi- 
tion of a county commissioner, John T. Jackman, of Lucas County, 
Ohio. 

The idea is all right because it properly places the cost of main- 
tenance and building of roads on those who use the roads and get 
the greatest benefit from this use. On the other hand, if such laws 
are passed and they are shown to be successful there should be, at 
the same time, some measure of relief afforded those who have 
hitherto been taxed on the capacity horse power of their machines. 
That kind of a tax is manifestly one that is entirely unfair to the 
owners of cars. 

No matter how much or how little used, cars are taxed according 
to what wear and tear they migh inflict on the roads if they were 
used. If the gasoline consumption tax is inflicted then relief should 
be given the owners of cars accordingly by a relief of taxation 
based on horsepower. 

Mr. Jackman puts it in this way: 

"Suppose a tax of I cent a gallon be imposed on gasoline sales, 
the man using ten gallons a week would pay 10 cents a week, while 
the company that operates a great fleet of trucks using thousands 
of gallons and doing thousands of dollars of damage to roads would 
bear their share. 

"Thus the pedestrian who does practically no damage to a road 
will not share the burden of upkeep. Under the present system 95 
per cent of the automobile owners and pedestrians are paying taxes 
for damages done by the remaining 5 per cent of car owners. 

"In addition, tourists and truckers not citizens of the State, would 
have to pay a share of the highway burden." 



A HUNDRED YEARS FROM NOW 

A hundred years from now, dear heart, 

We will not care at all. 
It will not matter then a whit 

The honey or the gall. 
The summer days that we have known 
Will all forgotten be and flown, 
The garden will be overgrown. 

Where now the roses fall. 

A hundred years from now dear heart, 

We will not mind the pain, 
This throbbing crimson tide of life 

Will not have left a stain. 
The songs we sang together, dear, 
Will mean no more than means a tear 

Amid a summer rain. 

A hundred years from now 

The grief will all be o'er, 
The sea of care will surge in vain 

Upon a careless shore. 
The glasses we turn down today 
Here at the parting of the way 
We will be wineless then as they 

And will not mind it more. 

A hundred years from now, dear heart, 

We'll neither know nor care 
What came of all life's bitterness. 

Or followed love's despair. 
Then fill the glasses up again 
And kiss me through the rose leaf rain. 
We'll build one castle more in Spain, 

And dream one more dream there. 



-John Bennet. 



BUTTER FROM A FISH 

It is not generally known that the Indians of British Columbia 
and Alaska obtain their butter from a fish known to scientists as 
the oolichan. It is from six to eight inches long and very fat. 

Every summer this fish comes from the ocean up the rivers to 
spawn, like salmon. Millions are taken in nets. First they are thrown 
into rough bins made of cedar logs, where they lie for a few days 
to soften in the sun. 

Then they are placed in great cedar vats for boiling water, the 
latter being heated by hot stones which are dropped into them. This 
primitive method of heating has been found to produce better butter 
than when the fish are boiled in the more orthodox fashion. 

As the oil rises to the top it is skimmed off. It hardens quickly 
and has the appearance of lard. Beautifully white, it is not easy 
to detect it from butter, there being not the slightest odor of fish 
about it. The Indians pack it in water-tight cedar boxes, making 
enough of this fish butter during the summer months to last them 
throughout the year. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 29, 1922 



i Yom Heard If 1 \ 

In his book, "Yarns," W. H. Macdonald tells the following: "He 
had been out of a job for a considerable time. One day he noticed 
in the local newspaper an advertisement for an engine-driver. He 
had, in the course of a migratory career, assisted a friend for a 
fortnight in the conduct of a donkey-engine on a coasting steamer, 
and was convinced that his experience would prove equal to the 
occasion. So he applied for the vacant position. 'Do you thoroughly 
understand engines?' asked the railway foreman when he presented 
himself. 'Oh, yes,' he confidently replied. 'Well,' said the foreman, 
pointing to an engine in a siding, 'take her into yon shed.' 'Very 
well, sir.' he replied. When he got on board he examined the va- 
rious cranks with interest and uncertainty. He turned one of them, 
and the engine started for the shed at the rate of 70 miles an hour. 
He was alarmed, and at random turned two or three other cranks. 
There was a sudden jerk, and the engine flew in the other direction. 
Fortunately the lines were clear. For the succeeding ten minutes 
the foreman witnessed a series of extraordinary and miraculous 
maneuveres. To and from the shed rushed the engine as one pos- 
sessed. As it wended its career onto the main line for the fourth time 
he shouted, 'What in the world are you doing, you silly ass?' And 
a voice rang out from the distance, 'It's you that's the silly ass. 
Why don't you shut the door of the shed? I've had her in three 
times.' " 

A down-on-his-luck ventriloquist with a nondescript kind of dog at 
his heels walked into public-house and ordered a glass of beer. "Give 
me one too," came from the dog. The barman, astonished, paused 
in the operation of drawing beer, looked down at the dog, and said: 
"That dog of yours talk?" 

"Of course I talk. Hurry up with the beer," said the dog. 

"Give him a drop of beer," said the ventriloquist; "not as big 
as mine — just a little one." 

Looking hard at the dog, the barman said, "He's only an ordin- 
ary dog, too. Do you want to sell him?" 

"Well," said the ventriloquist, "I'm pretty hard up, and I could 
do with a bit of change. What will you give?" 

"I'll give you $100 for that dog." 

"What will you do with him?" 

"I'll exhibit him and make money with him." 

"Well," said the ventriloquist, after a pause, "I'm afraid I'll have 
to take the money." He leaned down, patted the dog's head, and 
lifted him on to the counter. 

"Is this on the level, guvnor? Are you going to sell me?" asked 
the dog. 

"Good-bye, old man," said the ventriloquist, pocketing the money. 
"I'm sorry I must." 

"Well," said the dog, as the ventriloquist turned at the door to 
take a last sad look at his pet, "I'm a son of a gun if I'll ever talk 
again." 

And he didn't. 

* * * 

The Sunday school lesson was on Job. The superintendent of the 
primary department was earnestly endeavoring to picture the pain- 
ful existence of Job to his youthful audience. To this end he was 
dwelling at length upon poor Job's sufferings and the futility of all 
medical treatment. A small boy down front who had been absorbed 
in the tale, suddenly held up his hand. 

"What is it, Willie?" asked the superintendent. 

"Have they tried Doctor Smith?" asked Willie loyally naming the 
family physician. 



♦!* i* *> # # <« <• •> »j« ►:« •;* * »> *;* # >j» •;* •;• »> •> »;• »;* *> »;« * •> »!-• •;« «j« •;• •$• * •;« •$» •> <• <$» •$• £ «j« «j« •> # •$• * 

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HL6i*rtREO-T»A0£-1MK 







: The 

• FASHIONABLE 
; FASCINATING 
: GAME OF 
! THE SEASON 

; Has all the lure of the 

; Orient. 

I oAll the charm of the Occident. 

', A game as new and as old 

\ As the game of chance Cupid plays. 

* Every hand has a new thrill. Lean) this game 

of a thousand wonders. 

' On sale at all leading stores. 

'• MAH-JONGG SALES CO. OF AMERICA 
\ 112 Market St. 

T " t " T " f'f4 l < "T ' J t '^ " T , t " f , t , 4 " t " t " t " t " t " t "T"T "f l t , t " t"t , f ' t " t"t " H 't"t'it " l " t " l " i'^H H t j 

Casa Del Rey 



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SANTA CRUZ 



CALIFORNIA 



The ^Million 'Dollar Fireproof Hotel 



THE ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm 
beach bathing; dancing; good music; artistic, home-like 
spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful 
playgrounds; sanitary warm bathing pool; swimming 
instructors; saddle ponies for children. Special kitchen- 
ette in hotel proper where maid can prepare food for 
young children. 

Complete highways, through the most beautiful sec- 
tion of California. (Only SO miles.) The Southern Pa- 
cific offers unusually low rates from all California points; 
the warmest and most accessible beach out of San Fran- 
cisco. 



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.:. Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also * 

|> under the same management as Casa Del Rey. 



Correspondence about rates for families with maids * 

,£ and children solicited. Special rates by the week or for * 

* extended stays of a month or two. Address: 

* A 



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CASA DEL REY : : SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 

MORRIS & WARNER, Proprietors. Phone 600 

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July 29. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




agHBflaagHigaHHi^^ 



Points for Property Owners 



Making the Most of the Opportunity 

SllJSIglBiHBHaSBiaHlSlSlilllllllllllBllllliaSlllliailB 

BY MONTGOMERY SMITH 




THE PROPERTY owner has been urged to give his attention 
to politics and to take a more liberal interest in what is going 
on generally. This is one of the best ways to protect himself and 
his interests. 

There are many measures that are to come before the people 
in the next election, which should have the very careful analysis 
of all those who own property, because, directly or indirectly, any 
law has its effect in some way or another upon those who own prop- 
erty or who derive an income from rents. 

Measures that will increase the burden of taxation should be 
very carefully looked into in order to ascertain if the benefits to 
be derived are of such a character as to warrant increasing taxa- 
tion at this time when taxes are already at what is considered by 
man as a peak load to carry. 

Purchasing of public utilities, the entering into all kinds of en- 
terprises by the governments of States, cities, towns or counties, are 
things that demand the property owner's most serious consideration 
and the creation of such enterprises, all sponsored for by the peo- 
ple's money, through taxation, demands the attention of all of those 
who will be made stockholders, willingly or unwillingly. 

Particularly important is the proposed act by which all of the 
hydro-electric power possibilities, actual and potential, shall be| 
placed in the hands of a State commission to handle. The creation 
of such a board means giving an almost unlimited power to this 
commission and means the creation of a State monopoly as to the 
manufacturing and dissemination of the power thus manufactured, to 
those who may need in manufacturing and for other uses. This 
means the placing of a great deal of power, too much power, in the 
hands of political appointees, over whom no sort of restrictions 
have been placed. No property owner should allow the day of elec- 
tion to come around without having made himself thoroughly master 
of the subject and given this measure the most exhaustive study. 
If such study is given the property owner cannot avoid coming to 
the conclusion that what is really an adventure into the public own- 
ership of the most important utility and the management of this 
utility by politicians is a most dangerous law. 

The record of public utility management by States and cities is 
not of such a character as to warrant any great enthusiasm as to 
the probable outcome of the placing of power unlimited in the hands 
of a State commission while experimenting with the manufacture 
and disposition of hydro-electric power. It is too much risk and 
too much to lose, it is too much of an adventure without a precedent 
to look back upon to seem to warrant a successful issue. 

Another feature for the property owner to consider is that the 
proposed law means an attack on the rights of those who have in- 
vested their money in hydro-electric power producing plants and 
that it is a very poorly disguised attempt at the destruction of the 
efficiency of one of the largest of such plants in the world. Owners 
of stock in corporations are owners of property and as such all 
other property owners should rush to their aid when the value of 
their holdings is likely to be affected through the intrusion of the 
State in the business of running a public utility in competition with 
that now being successfully operated by the private corporation 
or individual. 

The operation of the utility, which purveys to the general pub- 
lic, is already and rightly surrounded by every possible legal control 
known to the ingenuity of man and it will serve the people very 
little to furnish an instrument which might very easily provide a 



death blow to concerns now giving a more than satisfactory ser- 
vice. It is not believed that the people desire or will condone doing 
harm through pure malice or to gratify the desire of more or less 
able men to gamble with the people's money in the running of a 
vast public enterprise. 

The measure affecting the production of hydro-electric power is 
not the only measure demanding the attention and the study of the 
property owner. There are others, but this one is mentioned because, 
in the magnitude of the the proposition, it is the worst menace to 
the public's welfare we know of at this time. 



COMPLAINTS AGAINST MAGAZINES 

Complaints to the American Legion that promoters of so-called "ex- 
service men's magazines" in this city were bringing discredit upon 
the Legion's rank and file have led to a discovery that three of these 
periodicals are published in this city, and that their sale at 25 cents 
a copy has constituted an annoyance to thousands of pedestrians 
and business people as well as a source of profit to their respective 
publishers. 

Inquiry revealed that one of the magazines, "Veteran's Life," is 
published by a man who served time in connection with a similar 
venture, "Fun in France," years ago. The editor of the same paper 
until last week, and now the promoter of the Service Record, the 
latest addition to the journalism of the "gob" and the "doughboy," 
was the former business manager of the Searchlight, organ of the 
Ku Klux Klan. Treat Em Square, probably the best known of the 
three magazines, has for its editor and chief owner a young man 
who has lived under no less than three names in this city during 
the past year. — New York World. 




Classy Apartments 
For Sale, $36,000 

Rents $5,280 per annum 

6 APARTMENTS of 4 rooms each, 
hardwood floors, steam heat, wall 
beds; inviting lobby; building in fine 
condition, near Bush and Jones. 

Only $11,000 Cash 

required for these down town 
apartments 

ADDRESS 382 RUSS BUILDING 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 29, 1922 



OPEN LETTERS TO INANIMATE OBJECTS 

Messrs. Hammer, Screwdriver & Gimlet. 

Gentlemen : When I took you into my domestic bosom and agreed 
to shelter you and keep you pure and spotless, I thought it was 
fully understood between us that you were to be on hand for every 
emergency. Instead of which, you persistently refuse to show up. 
Your willingness to keep me informed as to your whereabouts is 
the cause of constant irritation. Gentlemen, you are breaking up 
my home by your neglect. For the love of Allah, let me know 
where you are hiding yourselves. 

Ineffectually yours. 



Dear Eiderdown Quilt: Last night at 11 o'clock, in the confident 
belief tha you would stick by me, I decided to try sleeping on the 
porch. What I want to know is, Where were you at 2 o'clock in the 
morning? You had deserted your bed post, leaving me to shiver 
until well after dawn. This habit of yours of slipping away by your- 
self on the floor is causing more suffering and anguish than you 
realize. Always be on top — why not adopt that as your motto? 
Pneumoniacally yours. 



Office Filing System & Co. 

Dear Sirs: My object in writing this note is not to irritate you 
or misjudge you, but simply to see if I can get on better terms 
with you. Permit me, in the first place, to congratulate you on the 
way that you never talk back. I feel that everything I confide in 
you is perfectly safe — even from myself. Although I have been 
assiduously feeding you on all sorts of ideas, including bromides, 
for several months now, I cannot even find out whether the diet 
is agreeing with you or not. Although you have kept all the dates 
I have made with you, nobody knows what they are. Life with 
you appears to be one misplaced folder after another. In the fu- 
ture may I not count upon you to respond to my addresses? 
Interrogatively yours, 



My Dear Flask: 

Yours received and contents noted. You grow dearer to me all 
the time; you are constantly filling me with joy and enthusiasm. 
I notice, however, that your spirits are not quite as good as they 
used to be. The last time I passed an evening with you you knocked 
me out in three rounds. Brace up, old fellow! Always remember 
that the worst is yet to come. In spite of all your shortcomings 
I am completely hipped with you. 

Mysteriously yours. 



—Life 



The Experiment 



The wife of the great botanist beamed at him across the supper 
table. "But these mushrooms," she exclaimed, pointing to the dish 
that had been set before her, "are not all for me, Aristotle are 
they?" 

"Yes, Mabel," he nodded. "I gathered them especially for you 
with my own hands." 

She beamed upon him gratefully. What a dear, unselfish hus- 
band he was ! In five minutes she had demolished the lot. 

At breakfast the next morning he greeted her anxiously, "Sle-!p 
all right?" he inquired. 

"Splendidly," she smiled. 

"Not sick at all — no pains?" he pressed. 

"Why, no of course not, Aristotle," she responded. 

"Hurrah!" he then exclaimed, "I have discovered another species 
of fungi that isn't poisonous." — London Opinion. 



BRIEFLETS 

-The ears of grasshoppers are on their front legs. 



-There are about three thousand stitches in a pair of hand-sewn 



boots. 



— Last year 1 1 ,026 books were published in Great Britain, 8329 
in America and 32,345 in Germany. 



— The average maple tree yields enough sap to produce between 
five and ten pounds of sugar. 



— British coal miners returning to work after a long strike found 
their hands so soft they could not work. 



— Men harnessed to plows are not an uncommon sight in Morelos, 
Mexico, because of the scarcity of beasts of burden. 



— Women were first licensed to act women's part on the stage by 
Charles II in 1662. Up to that time feminine roles had been played 
by men and boys. 



— For the first time since 1914 a shipment of more than 1000 
game birds for stocking the game preserves of the West has come 
from Europe to the United States. 



— The best Oriental rugs represent prolonged labor. On each 
square foot of surface a weaver works about twenty-three days. 
A rug 12x12 feet therefore represents the labor of one man about 
ten years. 



— Antwerp, Belgium, is the center of the human hair industry. 
Raw hair and Chinese hair, which has been bleached, dyed and 
prepared, is used in the manufacture of women's hair nets. 



— Men who work in arsenic mines have to take every care to pre- 
vent themselves becoming poisoned. They work with bandages over 
their noses and mouths to keep away the arsenic dust. 



— Women patrons of the gambling casino at Monte Carlo out- 
number the men, as a general thing, two to one. 



— Sole leather that also is suitable for heels of all kinds of shoes 
is being made in Germany from leather waste. 



— Hues of humming birds differ in different parts of the world, 
but those in Arizona are perhaps the most brilliant. 




Pasteurized 



Modesto 
Creamery 
^<offioWA m Butter 

U" REGISTERED 



*ffi& 



Churned IJnlly nl Mndrxtn 



The Old-Established Brand, now being Distributed by 

FRED L. HILMER CO. 

Davis and Sacramento Sts. 

Beware of Imitations. Ask your grocer. Insist 
upon the Original Modesto Creamery Brand 



July 29, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




0» tULvillfkj OedUtm "tijm 

— The Wilkens case presents many curious phases and it is quite 
difficult to believe that Wilkens, despite the denials made by him, 
was not directly implicated in it. Questions arise as to why the po- 
lice, after originally having their suspicions aroused as to the Cas- 
tors, released them and allowed them to get away. Why, after it 
was stated at headquarters, according to the daily papers, were the 
Castors again traced and one of them arrested and this time the 
one who could establish a way of escaping any kind of serious 
consequences for his connection with the case? Why did the po- 
lice "sweat" Wilkens first and arrest him afterwards? Why the 
treatment accorded a man who had not even been formally accused 
of any crime? Where is the motive for Wilkens to hire anyone to 
have his wife killed? Is there, hidden under all of these mysteries, 
a woman? Is it to be made a regular feature of criminal investi- 
gations in San Francisco that suspects shall be arrested and turned 
over to reporters of a morning paper for the purpose of the third 
degree? It certainly looks as if Wilkens was implicated in this case 
but it also looks as though the prosecuting attorney had made this 
a fact much more difficult of proof, through his tactics as regards 
the accused. It is certain that much public sympathy has been given 
the man because of what seems to be very unjust treatment by the) 
authorities, preliminary to the trial of his case. 

— I see where there is a quite general protest as to the production 
of the Greek play "Oedipus." The play was most marvelously well 
acted but it is certain that its tone morally could be improved. Greek 
tragedy is no lesson for children to take before their morning cereal. 
And now it is announced that "Wild Birds" is again to be put on. 
It is a sacrilegious thing to do to write of a Greek tragedy of the 
merit of "Oedipus" in the same paragraph as "Wild Birds." "Wild 
Birds" has no excuse for production. It is just poorly written, and 
when presented before was very poorly done, underdone in fact, 
like a piece of raw veal. The university faculty may be composed 
of "old maids" but that being so these old maids must be blind 
and must have lost their moral senses, if ever they were possessed 
of such. It is a favorite saying that the university is self-controlled, 
that is, by the student body. Here is a board of governors needing 
the attention of a sanitary squad, to look after their mental and 
physical welfare. 

— Lorimer, the editor of the Saturday Evening Post, says that the 
moral tone of the daily press is improving and intimates that the 
greed for nudity in pictures and salaciousness in articles is diminish- 
ing and the public is demanding something different. Well, George 
may be right, but I doubt it much. At any rate the change in the 
public attitude must be confined, as yet, to George's immediate 
circle of admirers and every day companions in Philadelphia. The 
desired reform hasn't spread to the Pacific Coast, if we are to take 
the sort of stuff published on the Coast as any evidence of any great 
change in public taste or editorial acumen. 
* * * 

— And it is a four-cornered fight — Flo Ziegfeld has secured the 
able assistance of his wife, Billie Burke, and Miss Maralyn Miller 
has the silent assistance of Jack Pickford. It seems a war of tongue 
wagging and real mean things hurled at one another. So far there 
has been little harm done. Certainly the ladies in the case swing 
a nasty tongue and we now pause for the retort uncourteous from 
the sweet Maralyn. Mrs. Billie has red hair and a very fiery temper 
and the other lady in the case has a temper which seems quite 
capable of a fine answer. It has not yet got down to straight away 
catch as catch can hair pulling, but it may get to that stage soon. 



— Some Australian newspapers have been making a point against 
this country because of the number of lynchings in our Southern 
cities. The idea is given out that this country is given to sporadic 
"blood lust" and that whenever the fever takes us we just go out 
and lynch up a negro. Lynching is depicted as a national character 
trait. Supposing we turn about and give the Australian some of his 
own medicine. We read in an Australian paper that one John Bate- 
son Goodworth was recently arrested and sentenced to ONE MONTH 
of hard labor for cutting a horse's left eye in half, cutting the hind 
quarters, as if barbed wire had been used as breeching, the intes- 
tines were ruptured, and there was a lump under the stomach the 
size of a football. The horse was also bleeding from the mouth, 
the nose and the hind quarters, and all over the body. Other details 
of injuries are too horrid to repeat in print. The account goes on 
to say that "when the horse fell down Goodworth and a friend sat 
on it and smoked cigarettes." They then took the horse two and 
a half miles along Berrima road and it was left without food, water 
or care for two days and two nights. The magistrate sentenced the 
worthy Goodworth to one month at hard labor. And the committee 
of the whole council voted unanimously that a temporary hand be 
engaged for six weeks to do Mr. Goodworth's work and that Mr. 
Goodworth be granted four weeks' leave of absence. It would be 
a manifest injustice to all Australia to liken the rest of its citizen- 
ship to this Goodworth and the council of Bowral, for whom he 
labored. Yet that would be just about as fair a thing to do as to 
judge this great country by the blot of lynchings going on, some- 
times in the South. 

— Down the peninsula they have a new amusement resort called 
Pacific City. I went down there the other day, and after spending 
some time walking around and patronizing various concessions, the 
question which came to my mind was, why such a resort established 
at that particular place? It is usually supposed that demand is the 
law which creates anything of this kind. Was there a demand? That 
is certainly to be doubted. We have resorts of similar character 
where amusements may be had at less cost in time and trouble 
than at Pacific City. There is nothing extraordinary and the beach 
itself is, to me, rather a dreary and unpatronized place. The con- 
cessions looked cheap and tawdy and the board walk itself looked 
like the patched remnants of things that had been somewhere else. 
The worst feature connected with this "city" is the time consumed 
to get there. From the end of the street car line two jitneys seem 
to make possible reaching Pacific City. Because of these conditions, 
as regards reaching this place of amusement, it is made much more 
difficult to understand why the enterprise was launched at all. 

— Mabel Normand is again the limelight in the press; this time 
she gets a long review of her reasons for refusing to marry the 
nephew of the Shah, or some such thing. This is very good pub- 
licity, but it is scarcely the stuff one expects to find in the news- 
papers, published as news and front page material, at that. There 
is such a thing as having too much publicity and this is the case 
with Mabel Normand and Gloria Swanson. The two are running 
neck and neck and really the public is getting tired of it all, but 
the movie managers do not know it. They will not tumble to it 
until their favorite stars are "press-agented" out of public liking. 

* * * 

— One day last week the Hearst morning paper in San Francisco 
came out with screaming headlines that somebody was engaged in 
"Making San Francisco Safe for Johnson." We knew the feeling 
against Hiram was growing very fast but we did not know that it 
had grown to such an extent it was necessary to take measures as 
to Johnson's safety. We hope the chief of police will see to it 
that nothing happens to the wild progressive papoose. 

* * * 

— San Francisco is fast earning the title abroad of the Conven- 
tion City. Well ,we can stand it but there are many other tides 
which we may rightfully claim as well. San Francisco knows how. 



10 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 29, 1922 




Walks A* 



mint 



1 



BY CHARLES F. GALLAGHER 



SHADES of B. B. Spirit of the Boosters' League, departed 
wraiths of the Forward San Francisco movement, skeletons of 
the Great r Northern California Further Behind movement — Just 
when we thought we had laid the last of the misconceived, badly 
mismanaged abortive attempts to merchandise our city, by the heels, 
and buried the corpse, deep in the civic sepulchre — lo and behold, 
the Ghost again walks. 

This time it got off to a good start. The fifty-second anniversary 
of the attempt to sell the city started off with a whirlwind bang 
to the chagrin of the Lobby of International Society for the Pro- 
motion of the wearing of booster buttons, who had hoped on it 
being another B. B. idea. But no, signs of sanity were apparent, the 
papers got together and pulled together. Our slogan oft repeated 
in these columns that what this city needed was fewer starts and more 
finishes, looked as if it was to be realized. And just when the 
Amalgamated Society of Publishers of Insane Ideas had been given 
the gate, and the work started, then over the top of the horizon, 
the skeleton of the boost movements loomed, and with its ponder- 
ous clanking, sallied on the scene. Yea, brother, the Ghost again 
walks. This time, the convention got together addressed by the 
walking delegate of Unionized Nuts, with Boob McNutt as the re- 
ceiver for all former booster campaigns, and evolved the big, strik- 
ing idea of the movement. Attaboy! You can't get away from it. 
The idea was there. If applied to merchandising of food, it would 
run like this. Wholesale grocer calls up retail grocer on the phone 
— conversation as follows: "Hello, hello, are you a grocer — yes. 
Well this is a wholesale coffee house talking — Do you use our coffee 
— Don't say no, you'll hurt our feelings, but to encourage you to 
purchase it we are inaugurating a guessing competition. Guess who 
is speaking — No, we don't want to hear the answer — Good bye." 

This time the Ghost of the B. B. button became more insidious. 
It may have been a good stroke of business engineered by the tele- 
phone company to get a few thousand calls at 5 cents per, put 
across to fill up the service with public spirit, and thus help legiti- 
mate business men to do their telephone work more quickly — per- 
haps. And after 40,000, more or less, of local business men had 
answered their phones in the busy rush of the day, to be cheered 
with this civic guessing competition, as to whether Public Spirit 
was 102 proof or merely watered, the campaign gets under way. 
What Saturnalian mirth must ring in peals through the Underworld 
of Mishappen ideas in the Limbo of Impossible Happenings. But let 
us go on record. We would like to see this city merchandised, ad- 
vertised, sold, but we oppose the child-like ideas that creep into 
every campaign that make us the laughing stock of the Pacific 
Coast, the joke of civic improvement and turn to vinegar, the wine 
of fruitful ideas. You cannot raise money to sell a city if the 
initial sales campaign in raising the money leads the investor to 
believe that the way the money is to be spent is to be as per sam- 
ple of the initial campaign. Let the underwriting of a sum sufficient 
for an advertising agency or collaberation of agencies be raised. 
Let them pay such agencies for the submission of a plan to sell 
this city, as you would sell a hotel, a service, a food product, a 
manufactured article or anything else. With this as your motive, 
go out and raise the quota telling the investor where, how, why and 
when his money will be spent, and then spend it under the direc- 
tion of the agency or agencies hired. Keep the meddlers out of 
the movement. Let the rattle brained ideas of half-baked executives 



be put on the shelf in a three-cornered bottle and labeled. Then give 
the agencies a free hand, and you cannot but get results. Every- 
body's business is nobody's business. And anybody as a mythical 
celebrity never accomplished anything worth while. 

Who will lay the ghost? Who will bell the cat? We of the North 
are inclined to laugh at Los Angeles, to suggest perhaps that the 
population of Iowa, like in long division, is carried over to Los 
Angeles. But for real hick ideas on what to do, we seem to take 
the ghostly medal every time. A chain is as strong as its weakest 
link. A campaign is as good as its craziest idea. And for taking 
the royal imperial tissue potato masher, San Francisco ambulates 
off with the tin dish rag every time the starter's gun cracks. Does 
San Francisco know how? asks the ghost of public spirit. When 
somebody deems it advisable to spend money to ask the question 
40,000 times to a bunch of bewildered craniums that San Fran- 
cisco certainly does not know how, on the principle that a toy 
train never pulled a loaded freight car, you have got to get a busi- 
ness looking piece of steam machinery on the front end to produce 
results. However, the old song reads, You can't keep the sun from 
shining, and by the beard of Barney Google, you can't keep the 
Ghost from walking. We ask in all sincerity, and with hopes for 
its early demise: Who will lay the Ghost? Officer, close the door, 
the store's full. 



— Now comes a Montana woman who wants parties intending 
matrimony to publish their intentions several days in advance of 
the ceremony, that a physical examination of both parties be made, 
and that divorces be granted in the States where the marriages 
occur. All of these terrible things are asked for by a Miss Laura 
Church. 



I 



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Every sleeve the correct length 

Every neckband a perfect fit 

Every yoke sloped to the contour of your shoulders 

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4 07 W. Seventh Street 



July 29, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



11 



Sunb 



Old Buck's Cow 

Old Buck was known to his neighbors as 
a shrewd trader. He had a cow that seemed 
a desirable animal, and he went over her 
manifestly good points with one of "them 
city fellers" who had taken the Green place 
for the summer and wanted a fine milker. 

"How much milk will she give by the 
day?" asked the more or less hypnotized 
amateur. 

"Waal," said old Buck, speaking guard- 
edly, "she'd oughter give fifteen quarts — as 
she is now." 

This seemed satisfactory, and the buyer 
drove her home. After a fortnight he re- 
turned, with blood in his eye. 

"I thought you said that cow would give 
fifteen quarts a day," he began. "Three or 
four are all I can get out of her." 

"Waal," replied old Buck, with unruffled 
calm, "I said she'd oughter give fifteen, and 
that's a fact. But, consarn her, she never 
did while I had her." 



Cheap at Any Price 

He — Oh, come on; please do. 

She — I'm not that kind of a girl. 

He — Sal, I know a trick. Bet you I can 
kiss you without touching you. 

She — Don't be absurd. 

He — Fact. It's a trick. An awful cute 
trick. But you have to stand perfectly still. 

She — It can't be done. 

He — Can, too. I bet you a nickel I can 
kiss you without touching you. It's a swell 
trick. 

She — All right. Show me. 

He— Well, stand absolutely still or it 
won't work. And you don't want me to 
lose that nickel, do you? 

She — I won't move. 

He — (Kissing her square on the mouth.) 

She (indignantly) — Why, you did too 
touch me! 

He— Jove, I did. Well, I lose the nickel. 



The Piute Indians of California are no- 
toriously lacking in chivalry toward their 
women. Uncle Arch Farrington was driving 
down Westgard Pass road one hot summer 
afternoon and met Fatty Jack, a fat Piute, 
astride a small pony, which was visibly wob- 
bly under his burden, coming up. Uncle 
Arch was incensed to note Jack's wife car- 
rying a sack of flour and toiling along on 
foot. As he met the Indian, Uncle Arch 
called angrily to Jack: "What for you ridem 
poney, makem squaw walk? 

Fatty Jack, not deigning to stop or argue 
the ethics of the situation, called over his 
shoulder as he passed on. "She no gottem 
horse." — Judge. 



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— Sacramento's first six months' opera- 
tion under City Manager Clyde Seavey, for- 
merly chairman of the State board of con- 
trol, has shown phenomenal results. The 
new government inherited a deficit, but at 
the end of six months this had been wiped 
out and a surplus of $29,000 had been es- 
tablished. The budget for this fiscal year is 
$123,300 less than that of last year, and 
the tax rate has been decreased eight cents, 
in spite of the fact that assessments were 
decreased 15 per cent, or $3,330,000; fire 
and police salaries were increased and in- 
creased improvements amounting to $150,- 
000 were provided. A plan that makes such 
accomplishments possible surely meets with 
the public desire for "more business in gov- 
ernment." 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 




SAN FRANCISCO LAW SCHOOL 

FOURTEENTH SCHOOL YEAR 
Beginning September 6th, 1922 

Evening Sessions for Men and Women 

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Value in Any Vocation. 

Call or Write for Information 

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Kearny 4251 



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155 Montgomery St., Cor. Bush 



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Oakland, or Address A. P. COX, Prop., WRIGHTS, CAL. 



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Geo. Ormond Smith, Manager 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 29, 1922 




Busy Cupid 

A SURPRISE to friends in the bay cities 
came last Thursday with the announce- 
ment of the marriage of Miss Lorna Kil- 
garif, daughter of the late Mr. John M. 
Kiluarif and Mrs. Kilgarif of San Francisco, 
and Mr. William Dolman Inskeep of Berke- 
ley, which took place Wednesday evening 
in the little chapel of St. Paul's Church at 
Long Beach, Dean McCormick officiating. 
Only relatives were present. The bride is 
prominent in the younger set of San Fran- 
cisco. She is a sister of Mrs. William H. 
Taylor (Miss Doris Kilgarif) and of Captain 
Lester Kilgarif, U. S. A., now stationed in 
Honolulu. Mr. Inskeep is the son of Mr. L. 
V. Inskeep of Berkeley. Mr. and Mrs. Ins- 
keep are making a motor trip through the 
southern part of the State and on their re- 
turn will reside at Long Beach. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Harwood returned 
from their honeymoon and are at the Fair- 
mont Hotel, where they will make their home, 
their return here being the first intimation 
of their marriage in San Jose on July 3 at 
St. Joseph's Church. The newlyweds went 
on a motor tour of the South, visiting their 
relatives here and there and are now home 
to stay. Mrs. Harwood was the pretty Laura 
Sanborn, daughter of the late John Sanborn 
and of Mrs. Elizabeth Sanborn, a pioneer 
family of wide prominence in Central Cali- 
fornia. Mr. Harwood, whose mother, Mrs. 
Jane Harwood, lives in Pasadena, where the 
couple visited, made his home at the Bo- 
hemian Club for years. He was a member 
of the Burlingame and other clubs and has 
been a popular bachelor of society for years. 

— Another surprise received in society 
Monday was the announcement of the mar- 
riage of Mrs. Grace Batchelder Jones to 
George Baker Robbins, the ceremony hav- 
ing taken place in this city on Saturday, 




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July 22. Mr. and Mrs. Robbins will be at 
home after September I, at 1001 California 
street. The bride is an attractive young New 
York matron, who lived at the Fairmont for 
several seasons. 

— The announcement of the engagement 
of Miss Dorothy Buffum to Norman Chandler, 
eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Chandler, 
is of widespread interest in California, says 
a writer in the Spur, due to the prominence 
cf the prospective bridegroom's family and 
to the fact that in all probability the future 
responsibility of the Times-Mirror Company 
will rest upon young Chandler's shoulders. 
Miss Buffum is the youngest of the three 
children of Mayor and Mrs. C. A. Buffum, 
of Long Beach. Young Chandler is the fifth 
child and the eldest son in the good, old- 
fashioned Chandler family of eight children. 
The two married daughters, Mrs. John L. 
Kirkpatrick and Mrs. Roger Goodan, are 
the children of Mr. Chandler's first wife, 
while the six younger children, of which Nor- 
man is the third, are the grandchildren of 
the late General and Mrs. Harrison Gray 
Otis, as Mrs. Chandler is the eldest of Gen- 
eral Otis' three daughters, his son having 
died in infancy. Miss Buffum, as well as 
her fiance, is a graduate of Leland Stanford 
University. The wedding will take place early 
in September. 

Luncheons 

— Mrs. Chas. Josselyn, Mrs. Ettore Aven- 
ali and Miss Marjorie Josselyn were a charm- 
ing trio who lunched in the Garden of the 
Hotel St. Francis on Monday. 

— Mrs. George A. Pope, who returned re- 
cently from Boston and New York, was en- 
tertained informally at the Hotel St. Francis 
for luncheon recently. 

— Judge Max C. Sloss entertained a small 
group at luncheon in the Mural Room of 
the Hotel St. Francis on Friday last. 

— The Garden and Fable Room of the 
Hotel St. Francis were colorful with scores 
of smartly dressed women, gathered in 
small parties for luncheon on Monday. Mrs. 
Walter G. Filer entertained Mrs. Robert Hays 
Smith, Mrs. Nion Tucker, Mrs. Lawrence Mc- 
Creery, Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran and Mrs. 
Frederick Wilson Pritchett of Philadelphia, 
who is visiting in San Francisco with the 
Sydney Clomans. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Rex Sherer will give two 
al fresco parties, one on August 2 and the 
other on August 5, for their Marin County 
friends and a few from town. Both will have 
dancing and music. 

— Mrs. Willard O. Wayman gave a lunch- 
eon party at her home at Ross Thursday. 

— In honor of Mrs. Harry Howard Webb 
of Montecito, who visited at the Fairmont 
Hotel for several days, and Mrs. Wendell 
P. Hammon, who is being welcomed upon 
her return after several months in the East, 



Mrs. Charles H. Holbrook Jr. gave a de- 
lightful luncheon at the San Francisco Golf 
and Country Club on Monday afternoon. 
Teas 

— As an honor to Mrs| R. K. Nuttal, Miss 
Margaret Foster entertained at a small tea 
and bridge party Saturday afternoon. The 
affair was held at the home of the hostess 
in San Rafael. 

— Mrs. Andrew S. Rowan entertained a 
dozen guests at an informal tea Monday aft- 
ernoon, the affair having been held at the 
Town and Country Club. Major and Mrs. 
Rowan are spending the summer as usual 
at their country place in Blythedale Can- 
yon, Mill Valley. 

Dinners 

— Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Raas, whose 
country home in Ross is a • rendezvous for 
the artistic set across the bay, entertained 
at dinner Wednesday Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Jer- 
rold Meiggs. 

— A dinner was given Sunday night by 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin at her home in Broad- 
way at which the guests included Colonel 
and Mrs. Basil Rittenhouse, Mrs. Kenneth 
F. McRae, Miss Mollie and Miss Helene Mer- 
rirk, Philip Paschel, John Wallace and Ed- 
ward A. Davis. 

—Mr. and Mrs. William Mayo Newhall 
gave a small dinner party for Lieut, and Mrs. 
Edgar Allan Poe last week. On Saturday 
night Philip Baker also entertained for them. 

— Colonel and Mrs. Ernest Tilton were 
the guests of honor at a recent dinner party 
given by Major and Mrs. Richard Dodson 
at Fort Scott. The former are en route to 
San Pedro, where Colonel Tilton will be in 
command of the Coast defense in the South. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Forbes MacDon- 
ald will entertain at a dinner party on Sat- 
urday night at the Belvedere Country Club 
incident to the dance at the Country Club 
at Belvedere the same night. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hayes Smith en- 
tertained some of their friends Wesnesday 
evening at a dinner party at their home. 

— Miss Josephine Grant was hostess at a 
small dinner party at her home in Burlingame 
on Monday evening in honor of the young 
men visiting their university chums. George 
Rose visiting Richard Schwerin, Horace 



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July 29. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



Moody of New York visiting at the Bourn 
home, and several others were the guests 
of honor. 

House Parties 

— Dr. Harry Tevis has been entertaining a 
house party for several days at his home in 
Alma. Among his guests are his sister, Mrs. 
Frederick Sharon, Mrs. Richard Bayne and 
Mr. and Mrs. George Kelham. 

— Miss Isabelle Bishop and her house 
guest. Miss Frances Pringle, are being con- 
stantly feted by the younger set of Santa 
Barbara and Montecito during their stay 
in the South. Mrs. James Hall Bishop is at 
her ranch at Goleta for the season and Miss 
Pringle has been her guest for the past four 
weeks. 

— Miss Marion Zeile is the guest of Mrs. 
Charles Templeton Crocker for this week. 
She will leave on Monday to join her cousin, 
Mrs. Cheever Cowdin, at Tahoe Tavern. Mrs. 
Cowdin will come here on a short visit and 
will go East after a sojourn at Del Monte. 
Her husband has joined friends at the Bo- 
hemian Grove near Guerneville. 
In Town and Out 

— Miss Sally McAdoo has arrived from 
Washington, D. C, and she is spending the 
summer in Los Angeles with her father, Wil- 
liam Gibbs McAdoo. The McAdoos have re- 
cently taken possession of their new home 
at 4 Beverly Square. 

— Mrs. William Babcock slipped off quietly 
last week from her home in San Rafael, 
leaving word that she was motoring north 
with British Columbia as her destination. She 
will be gone a month and will stop at sev- 
eral points of interest en route. 

Lieutenant and Mrs. Edgar Allen Poe IV, 
who have been enjoying their honeymoon 
at the Yosemite Valley and more recently 
in San Francisco, left for Colorado, where 
they will reside for the present. While in 
this city Mr. and Mrs. Poe were guests at 
the Fairmont Hotel. 

— Mrs. Benno Hart and her daughter, Mrs. 
C. Ellsworth Wylie, motored south last week 
and they are spending several days at the 
Samarkand in Santa Barbara. 

— Mr. Horace Moody of New York has 
arrived from the East to visit his aunt, Mrs. 
William Bourn and Mrs. Bourn, in San Ma- 
teo Saturday. Mrs. Bourn entertained Sat- 
urday at a dinner in honor of her nephew. 
The young man will be on this Coast until 
Princeton reopens in the fall. 

— Mr. and Mrs. I. N. Walter have gone 
to their country place at Tahoe for the sum- 
mer. The Edgar Walters, who have been in 
Europe for the past year, are expected home 
this fall. 

— Mrs. Louise Frank, who has been in 
Paris, London and New York since early 
spring, returned and is making her home at 
the Hotel St. Francis until fall, when she 
plans to go to New York to reside. 



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—Mr. and Mrs. William Roth and Mrs. 
Roth's mother, Mrs. William Matson, left 
Monday morning to motor to the Yosemite 
Valley. They will be away for a week or 
ten days. The Roths have the James A. 
Folger home at Woodside for the summer 
months. 

—Mrs. D. C. Jackling, Mrs. Herbert Allen 
and Mrs. Herbert Moffitt are at Lake Tahoe, 
while ther respective husbands are at the Bo- 
hemian grove. 

— Mrs. William Delaware Nielsen and her 
daughter-in-law, Mrs. Felton Elkins, are at 
El Mirasol in Santa Barbara. They plan to 
motor to Los Angeles and Pasadena before 
returning to San Francisco. 

— Mr. and Mrs. James Kendall Armsby 
are sojourning at Shasta Springs en route 
East. 

— Major and Mrs. Laurence Redington 
have chosen Francis Laurence Philip as the 
name for their son and heir who was born 
a week ago Saturday. The christening will 
be held at their home in North Charles street 
in Baltimore early in August. 

— Mrs. Arthur Lord has written of the en- 
joyable rest she is having at Vittel, in South- 
ern France, where she is taking the cure. 
She has been indisposed and was obliged 
to interrupt her travels for a few weeks' 
time, but she is now much improved. Mrs. 
Lord plans to return to the United States 
in October, and after a short stay in New 
York, she will come to San Francisco. 

— Mrs. Downey Harvey and her daughters, 
Mrs. Genevieve Barron and Mrs. Oscar 
Cooper, plan to leave London the second 
week in August. They will stay in New York 
a few days before returning to San Fran- 
cisco. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Henry Percival Dodge are 
coming from London the latter part of Au- 
gust and will pass a few weeks in the East 
visiting relatives. They will come to Cali- 
fornia to see Mrs. Dodge's mother, Mrs. Ar- 
thur Page-Brown, and her sisters, Mrs. Harry 
McAfee and Mrs. Austin Moore. Mrs. Dodge 
was Miss Agnes Page-Brown. She was mar- 
ried to the American ambassador to Belgrade 
in Paris last April. 

— LeRoy Linnard left a fortnight ago for 
the East and is touring the New England 
States, having recently visited friends in Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

— Mrs. James Garfield Boyd has arrived 
from her home in Seattle and is a guest of 
her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank Hooper, at their home at Woodside. 

Intimations 

— Mrs. Horace Davis Pillsbury has an- 
nounced her intention of returning to the 
United States within a few weeks and she 
expects to sail for home the latter part of 
August. She will not, however, come West 
at once but will sojourn with relatives in 
Boston until her sons, Evans Pillsbury II and 
Taylor Pillsbury have returned to their East- 
ern schools. 

— Mrs. William C. B. de Fremery, who 
is devoting her time to a serious and very 
successful study of literature, is in Algiers 
gathering material with which to write the 
book she is now engaged upon. 



— Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Dibble will return 
to their home in Steiner street the first week 
in August, after having enjoyed a month at 
Wawona. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edward Hull Lohmann of 
Oakland are in Berlin for the months of 
July and August. 



Does Reading Tire You? 

Ever have to move the book — or news- 
paper — or seek a stronger light to see 
more clearly? You think perhaps it's be- 
cause you're sleepy, but most likely it's 
because you need glasses or the glasses 
you are now wearing are no longer correct 
for you. 

W. D. Fennlmore A. It. Fennlmore 

J. W. Davis 




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Phone Oakland 2521 



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EXPERT Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 29, 1922 





LFINA NC1AU 

By P. N. BERINGER 




HPhE RECURRENT ebb and flow in the 
-"- bond buying business is showing itself 
in a renewed flow and bond buying is in 
a more healthy trend again all over the 
country. And San Francisco is no excep- 
tion to ihe rule. The only question is for 
the investor in bonds to make a study of 
what particular securities it is best to buy. 
For that purpose the advice of well estab- 
lished bond and security houses is necessary 
and such advice should be sought. 
* * * 

Concurrently with a renewed movement 
in the buying of bonds has come a move- 
ment in the direction of investment in oil 
and mining securities. Here even greater 
care in investigating is necessary and this 
care cannot be made more effective than by 
consulting every authority of any value that 
may be available to the would-be investor. 
Of course, there are mining shares and oil 
shares to be had anywhere in any quantity 
that may be desired and that only makes 
the selection more difficult than it has ever 
been before. Mining in California and in 
Nevada was never on a more healthy foot- 
ing than it is today but despite this fact there 
never was a greater chance of losing money 
by the investor through careless or ill con- 
sidered investments. Those who put their 
money in shares in oil or mining stock, with 
a view purely to speculative results, have of 
course, far different considerations to ob- 
serve, and if they are taking big chances 
to make money they are also exposed to los- 
ing money more readily than those who are 
investing their money in what they consider 
a going money-making dividend paying con- 
cern. 

In business circles in this country the pre- 
vailing spirit is one of a growing construc- 
tive optimism. And if it were not for the 
two big strikes we have on our hands we 
would find the general news from all quar- 
ters emphasizing what we have just written. 
The strikes are, however, very bad features 
in the situation and they will have effects, 
later on, that will be bad unless they are 
checked now and the strikes are called off. 
Standard industries are increasing their out- 
puts and values are rising, money is much 
easier, the crop outlook is unusually good, 
the banking situation is exceptionally strong. 
The one big danger, apart from the strikes, 
is the too rapid advance in values. The av- 
erage level of wholesale commodity prices 
is now fully up ten points since the first of 
May, after a period of fully eight months in 
which there was little or no change in the 
average level. One effect of this advance in 
prices has been to greatly stimulate many 
lines of business. So far, the stock market 
has not been' very much affected by the 



strikes because these have been counted part 
or total failures. 

A question which is of interest to every- 
one in California is that involved in the pro- 
posed law which would make shingling with 
wooden shingles somewhat of a felony. There 
can be no doubt that this law will do the 
makers of non-inflammable shingles a great 
deal of good and this will be expressed by 
an increased amount of money received for 
their product. It is said that the manufac- 
turers of non-burnable shingles are respon- 
sible for the inclusion of the prohibitory 
clause as to wooden or inflammable shingles 
in the law. This may or may not be true, 
but it certainly looks as if it may be true. 

Most of the wooden shingles used in the 
past in California have been made of red- 
wood and all Californians know the redwood 
is not a readily inflammable material. Try 
to start a fire on a redwood shingle and you 
will find it is almost as good as a piece of 
metal upon which to do so. Try to relight 
a piece of redwood that has once been 
charred and you will be surprised at the 
difficulty in getting anything like a flame. 

It is not at all difficult to find a redwood 
grove or forest in most of Northern Cali- 
fornia. Fires have occurred in these groves 
and in most instances the evidence of these 
fires are found at the base of the standing 
redwood trees. These trunks are fire scarred 
but they still stand and are green and beau- 
tiful to their very tops. A really burned tree 
is the exception, the great exception in any 
of these groves and forests. Besides, how 
many times have you known of fires that 
were caused by ignition from sparks falling 
on shingled roofs? It is safe to bet that 
outside of a legendary knowledge of such 
causes of fire real information on the sub- 
ject would show very few cases on record. 
Vote NO on the State Housing Act referen- 
dum at the November election. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

The law aims a death blow at an industry 
which is one of the most important on the 
Pacific Coast and in its application it would 
have the effect of enhancing the cost of 
building to a very great extent. The people 
are generally interested in seeing this law 
read off the statute books for two very strong 
reasons. One of these is that the cause of 
fires from shingle roofs is not nearly as pre- 
valent as it is supposed to be, and until some 
non-inflammable roofing is produced, which 
is not prohibitive as to use because of price, 
the objection to the use of shingles cannot 
be made very strong, and the other is that 
too large an industry is affected by such leg- 
islation and too many people affected, who 



earn their living in the various shingle mills 
of the Coast. 

We now have a lot of freight rate reduc- 
tions by the railroads. The Southern Pacific 
Company has reduced the rate on box shooks. 
This will aid the fruit shippers materially. 

The depreciation of the mark still con- 
tinues in Germany, although the falling pur- 
chasing value of the mark is not going on 
at as rapid a rate as in the recent past. The 
coal and iron industries of Germany are go- 
ing through a very strenuous period of re- 
adjustment to conditions and the wonderful 
thing has happened of under-production of 
coal to such an extent that Germany has been 
forced to buy coal of England at enormous 
prices. The depreciation of the mark has 
been of benefit to no one except the German 
exporters as it has enabled them to carry 
on a wholesale dumping of German-made 
goods in foreign markets. German crops bid 
fair to be partial failures this year and taking 
it altogether the prospects in Germany are 
not at all good. In Austria the conditions 
are worse than in Germany. Austria has 
just about reached a period in its existence 
where it is pitiful to contemplate the wreck 
of what was once a powerful empire. 

* ¥ * 

Work in all the principal mines of Tono- 
pah, and especially in the Tonopah Divide, 
is progressing at a rapid and a most en- 
couraging rate and it would not be surpris- 
ing if the shares of all mines would take an 
upward spurt in the very near future. 

Goldfield shares are remarkably quiet, 
especially when it is taken in consideration 
what a future there is before that district. 
The Silver Pick lease on the Red Top ground 
continues to hold the attention of the min- 
ers who are watching keenly the trend of 
operations and the output from the mine 

continues good. 

* * * 

There is a great deal of work going on 
quietly in all of the Goldfield mines. 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter. Just Out 

352 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seems necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



July 29, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



15 



The Realm of Booklarid 



Behind the Mirrors is the natural sequence 
of The Mirrors of Washington. The first 
production of the anonymous author met 
with a most favorable reception from the 
buying public and it must have been quite 
an adventurous enterprise on the part of 
the publishers, G. P. Putnam & Sons, be- 
cause it was opening up a new style of por- 
trayal of affairs at Washington. The new 
book Behind the Mirrors is an extensive 
character study and a supposed liming of 
the people who are just now in the public 
eye at the national capitol. We cannot help 
believing that the writer is far from being 
infallible and that his deductions, while bril- 
liantly made, are not to be taken too ser- 
iously. Taking Mr. Harding as an instance, 
the author attempts to show that the Presi- 
dent is much akin, in many particulars, with 
the gentle McKinley. Events of quite recent 
occurrence show us quite the reverse is the 
case and that Mr. Harding is possessed of a 
backbone and a will of his own. The analy- 
sis of Mr. Hughes is very amusing, al- 
though to one who knows the judge, it is 
by no means convincing. His deduction, the 
author's, I mean, is that Hughes doesn't pos- 
sess common sense because he doesn't sense 
reality. That he has no common sense be- 
cause he lives in a region of facts, principles 
and logical deductions. The whole book is 
well worth reading and it takes quite a while 
to read. It is an assortment of brilliantly 
worded knocks which the reader will find 
very difficult not to take so seriously as to 
affect his judgment of the men the knocks 
are aimed at. The book is in itself a mirror 
of the mentality of society which can work 
itself into an honest belief that it sees little 
or any good in anything at all and. as such, 
it is valuable because there is a dangerous 
tendency just now in the direction of fault 
finding upon very slim foundation for such 
adverse criticism of our men and our meas- 
ure. G. P. Putnam & Sons, New York. $2.50. 



Anthony Blum has compiled and written 
a lot of information for those who may be 
interested in facts as to how to find oil and 
where to look for it. "Petroleum'' is a ref- 
erence book for those who may be inter- 
ested in knowing more about this very in- 
teresting subject than may be gleaned by 
reading a technical work or a daily news- 
paper. The style is very apt to the purpose 
of the writer and consists of short, crisp, 
fully descriptive sentences that are devoid 
of any attempt to flowery or useless speech. 
The book treats of the geological, construc- 
tive, operative, commercial and fiscal phases 
of the subject. It tells, as nearly as can be 
told, where to find oil, what to do when 
it is found, how to drill, and a variety of 
other things a man would wish to know. It 
is a most valuable book to any reader and 
most valuable to such reader interested in 
finding oil or in the development of an oil 
producing proposition. Modern Mining Book 
Publishing Company. Chicago; $2 deliv- 
ered. 



Cleveland Tool Secures Grass Springs 

Manufacturing and sales rights for Gruss 
Air Springs have been secured by the Cleve- 
land Pneumatic Tool Company. The device, 
which utilizes cushions of compressed air 
to absorb road shocks and vibrations, has 
been manufactured for several years by the 
Pneumatic Cushion Company of San Fran- 
cisco, patentees. 



Cafe Marquard 

GEARY AND MASON STREETS 
Telephone Prospect 61 

Visitors in San Francisco Delight in the 
Gay Bohemian Atmosphere, the Enter- 
tainment and Dancing-, the Bare Quality 
of Food and Courteous Service 



LUNCHEON 

Continental Style 

Twenty-six Delicious Dishes, Prepared 

and Served So Differently 



DINNER 



Every Evening — Six to Nine 
Also Select a la Carte 



Dancing and Cabaret 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 11 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



VISIT 



cc 



Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 477 2 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUPERIOR 



(25 years in business) Kearny 2842 

ENJOY YOUR VACATION BY 
HAVING YOUR 

HAIR PERMANENTLY 
WAVED 

—at— 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

360 Geary Street 
San Francisco 

We consider the health fo your hair. 
Mr. J. and Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove 



PACIFIC GAS AM) ELECTRIC 
COMPANY 



:52ml Consecutive Quarterly Dividend on 

First Preferred stock 

THE regular dividend, for the three 
months ending July 31st, 1 ft 2 2 . of $1.50 
per share, upon the full-paid Firs! 
ferred Capital Stock of the Company will 
he paid on August 15th. 1!I22. to sharp- 
holders of record at the end of the quar- 
terly period. Checks will he mailed in time 
to reach stockholders on the date tli- 
payable. 

A. F. HOCKENBEAMEK. 

Vice-President and Treasurer. 
San Francisco. California. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 29, 1922 




PL/EASURE/S WAND 



"Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Mystery and Melodrama at Alcazar 

"The Night Caller" is a thriller — just one 
maze of mystery with electrical currents 
shooting through it. A man is shot in the 
first act, and the quick action sequence of 
events this causes keeps the audience in a 
state of baffled excitement throughout the 
play. It is the kind of thing the Alcazar 
players Jo best; swift-moving situations of 
intense surprise sustain the interest of the 
onlooker and keep his mind off details of 
finesse. The stage management is excellent, 
a matter of utmost importance in such a 
play. Miss Gladys George, as Alice Dodge, 
the harried heroine of the melodrama, is 
making her last appearances with the com- 
pany this week. She will take with her, upon 
her departure, the pleasantest of memories, 
for her exquisite prettiness and agreeable 
voice have endeared her to us. Ben Erway 
is going too. Alack and alas. Whatever 
shall we do without him? This is a real loss 
and your critic hopes it will be but a tem- 
porary one. Miss Lovell Taylor, a new- 
comer, made a good impression. Charles 
Yule was not in his best form, but then 
the part was a poor one. Ned Doyle, how- 
ever, with the true actor's art, succeeded 
in putting personality into an equally color- 
less role. Brady Kline and his astonishing 
enunciation played a congenial part, that of 
a hard-boiled detective person who never 
removed his hat and seldom his revolver, 
and whose lines were all spoken through 
clenched teeth and motionless lips; whole 
sentences issued as one word; it was indeed 
a remarkable performance. Mr. Kline has a 
tolerant manager who will allow him to speak 
in such a manner. Miss Florence Printy is 
leaving the company, too. Frederick Green 
did a daring villain in the dark, recognized 
by his voice which is a good one and al- 
ways properly used. And now, there is not 
a soul in the cast left to mention save Her- 
bert Heyes, the recently acquired leading 
man. On August 13 Dudley Ayres returns 
unto his own. Thank goodness! 



Varied Attractions at Orpheum 

The one-act play is always the best thing 
on the bill, no matter how poor it is. Harry 
Fox and Beatrice Curtis might have found a 
far finer skit than "Interruptions" for their 
several talents, but even so, it is highly in- 
teresting. Why do not more people write 
one-act plays for vaudeville? Then, as a 
matter of course, with a wider field from 
which to select, the actors would have better 
ones. "Interruptions" is full of funny lines 
and situations and the two stars make an 
effective hit with it. Emilie Lea, dancer, high 
kicker, contortionist and athlete, does some 
truly amazing stunts. Grace Fisher, "the 
Dresden China Prima Donna," is a singer of 
considerable charm and she has a well se- 
lected program. Billy Beard, the black-face 
comedian, has some new jokes and his pop- 
ularity as a genial fumaker is undiminished. 



"Under the Same Old Moon," with Edith 
Taliaferro and her company, remains for the 
second week. The Queen City Methodists 
make music of a sort. 



Columbia 

The dignity and historical interest of 
"Abraham Lincoln" gives way, after a highly 
successful season at the Columbia, to a 
lighter and brighter form of entertainment. 
Thus are all our varying tastes provided with 
the food they prefer. This evening Frank 
McGlynn gives his final performance of Lin- 
coln in the famous Dnnkwater plan, and on 
Monday the curtain rises on a comedy whose 
very name smacks of interest to those of 
us who feel sometimes the distance of three 
thousand milles between ourselves and the 
dramatic hub of the country. "Little Old 
New York" is the play, and after its tre- 
mendous success in Gotham it should serve 
to delight San Franciscans, especially with 
so fine a cast as we shall see next week. Isa- 
belle Lowe and Creighton Hale head the list. 



Granada 

Basil King's "The Dust Flower" makes a 
magnificent moving picture. The produc- 
tion is on a lavish scale, and while the ma- 
terial of the story contains nothing start- 
lingly new, the play is of a high standard 
and the interest of both plot and photo- 
graphic art is well sustained throughout. 
Helen Chadwick is a charming heroine, and 
by this very charm she (though but a poor 
girl) wins the noble hero (a person of con- 
siderable wealth). James Rennie is the for- 
tunate youth thus won. Claude Gillingwater 
is a soul-satisfying butler with the delicious 
name of "Steptoe." A Mack Sennett comedy 
called "Sunbeams" and the ever-exciting 
news film, as well as Paul Ash's jazz band 
and Betty Anderson, a pleasing soprano, all 
go to make up the uncommonly good bill 
at the Granada this week. 



Strand 

Harold Lloyd's best comedy, "Grandma's 
Boy," is being retained for the second week 
to accommodate the crowds eager to see it. 
The film is packed with laughs and has con- 
siderable good acting in spots. Fitzpatrick 
has arranged a new musical bill for this 
show and there are added bills to liven up 
the entertainment. 



Imperial 

A provocative title is "The Delicious Lit- 
tle Devil," and coupled with two such names 
as Mae Murray and Rodolph Valentino, it 
has drawn the crowds to the Imperial this 
week. Miss Murray, need it be noted, is the 
D. L. D." of the play, and her bewitching, 
piquant loveliness, her irresistable dancing 
and her adorable though familiar manner- 
isms fit her eminently for the part. Small 
wonder, then, that the romantic Rodolph falls 
desperately in love with her, and in doing so 



makes his 
For as a 
without a 
love does 
us it never 
never give 
beautiful, 
under his 
on the vio 



audience fall in love with him. 
lover this gentle-eyed Adonis is 
peer. The course of their true 
not run smooth, tradition tells 
does. But in the movies one need 
way to anxiety; the end is always 
Prior's orchestra do good work 

masterly leadership, and his solos 

in are a musical treat. 



California 

"Nanook" is decidedly an educational 
picture of the best kind. It deals with the 
Eskimo people of the Far North — not the 
movie kind we have been accustomed to in 
tales of mounted police and Alaska snows. 
The management has been particularly for- 
tunate in securing this film, for it must have 
cost a small fortune to send the photograph- 
ing party to the scene of action. The catch- 
ing of walruss, fox and seals is most inter- 
esting, to say nothing of the building of an 
igloo. A great deal more of such fine, in- 
forming pictures would be appreciated. 

Severi does some good work with the 
musical part of the program and there are 
comparative reels of the McKinley and Wil- 
son inaugurations, with a little of President 
Harding thrown in for good measure. Sev- 
eral short features complete the bill. 



Portola 

The theme of the play "Probation Love" 
is not one to stir the depths of the thought- 
ful critic. In fact, it is rather rot. But 
Thomas Meighan is an actor of distinguished 
parts, and Norma Talmadge is a most pleas- 
ing personality and these two can "get away" 
with almost anything in the way of a mo- 
tion picture. How much more amusing if 
they had a worth-while play that would hold 
the interest and command the respect of the 
audience. The story of the cafe entertainer 
who gives herself to a rich New York busi- 
ness man and marries him "on probation" 
and mutual love descends upon them — that 
sort of think palls after a time, and we have 
had much of it to endure in recent movies. 
The Christie Comedy, with Neal Burns and 
Vera Steadman, is called "Bucking Broad- 
way" and serves well its humorous purpose. 



T! 



SAK FRANCISCO 



W ^ftuDEWUA.% 




MA ™f s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted In Dress Circle 

and Logos 



July 29, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



17 



Another short film, "Something to Worry 
About," and the musical selections complete 
an attractive but not unusual bill. 



The Orpheum Next Week 

Crane Wilbur and Suzanne Caubet bring 
to the Orpheum a clever playlet, "Wright 
or Wrong." Mr. Wilbur and Miss Caubet 
have just finished an exceptional summer 
season in Oakland. 

Yashoff Staffanov, violinist, is sure to be 
another musical sensation. Emilie Lea, the 
best female dancer the Orpheum has ever 
had and her clever company and skit will 
provide wonderful entertainment. Fern Red- 
monds and H. Wells, a mighty clever pair, 
present a laughable turn entitled "The Gyp." 
Cooke, Mortimer and Harvey play a ball 
game in the dark and present one of the 
greatest novelties vaudeville has ever seen. 



Alcazar 

Herbert Heyes' first appearance as a star 
on the legitimate stage was made in "Civi- 
lian Clothes," one of the cleverest comedies 
of recent years, in which he created the prin- 
cipal role and which ran for an entire season 
in Los Angeles. In response to repeated re- 
quests from many of its patrons the Alcazar 
has decided to present this popular play with 
Heyes in his original part for his farewell 
week, beginning Sunday matinee, July 30. 

Emelie Melville has been especially en- 
gaged for an important part and a cast of 
players of unusual excellence. The story of 
"Civilian Clothes" is amusing and entertain- 
ing in the extreme. 

Katherine Van Buren will appear in the 
role of the young woman in the case. It is 
a characterization which will give her a 
splendid chance as a cemedienne. All of 
the other members of the company and sev- 
eral specially engaged players will appear in 
the production. 



Hurricanes to Order 

Have you ever wondered how the varieties 
of weather — rain, fog and wind — that one 
sees on the cinema screen are produced? I 
artists and protographers waited for real 
weather such as they required to occur, a lot 
of valuable time would be wasted. 

The simplest solution is to make your 
own weather, so that you can turn on just 
the type you want. 

Three appliances are used. The first is 
the rain-maker, which looks like a lightly- 
made fire engine. It is provided with a lattice 
work tower on the top of which stands an 
operator who, by opening or closing taps, 
can produce either fine or heavy rain. 

The rain is directed toward the air current 
made by the wind machine, and by varying 
the strength of the "wind." the "rain" can 
be made to fall gently or in wild driving 
squalls. 

The wind-maker is nothing more than an 
engine with a large propeller mounted on a 
motor-lorry. By regulating the speed you 
can have a gentle breeze that will just ruffle 
the heroine's curls, or a hurricane which tears 
leaves and branches off the trees and buffets 
the players as severely as a real storm. 



The fog machine, also mounted on a lorry, 
contains a number of metal nozzles provided 
with regulating valves. Through them a 
harmless white gas is liberated in such quan- 
tities as may be necessary. 



FOR CLEAN SPORT 

The promoters of horse racing in Cali- 
fornia who will operate at Tanforan are out 
against the "horse racing with gambling bill." 
Their opposition seems to be well grounded 
and there is every reason to believe that 
Howard Spreckels, the secretary, is correct 
when he says that this bill would interfere 
with the high aims of the Pacific Coast 
Jockey Club and that it would again bring 
horse racing into disrepute in this State. 
Those who are behind the Pacific Coast Jock- 
ey Club are animated with the desire to bring 
horse racing back on a legitimate basis as a 
public benefit. 

A. B. Spreckels is president of the club, 
his brother, Rudolph Spreckels, is vice presi- 
dent, and Herbert Fleischacker is the treas- 
urer. Thomas Fortune Ryan of New York 
is one of the stockholders. Names like these 
should be a sufficient guarantee that the sport 
will be kept clean. 



tournament for men guests 
Inn commencing August 7. 
prize. 

— Fishing in the lakes 
River Inn, of which there a 
in ten miles, never was 
now. The fish are rising to 
people from the inn are 
daily. 



At Del Monte 

—Mrs. Charles B. Alexander of New York, 
sister of William H. Crocker of San Mateo, 
is making a visit to Del Monte and Pebble 
Beach. Mr. and Mrs. James L. Flood and 
daughter. Miss Mary Emma Flood of San 
Francisco, and Mr. and Mrs. Ed Tobin, and 
Mrs. Carthew of San Mateo are also at the 
Lodge. 

— Lord and Lady Carbery of Ireland are 
spending several weeks at the Hotel Del 
Monte, and they are among the most inter- 
esting visitors to have been at the resort 
this year. The ycung nobleman is taking out 
papers to become an American citizen and 
he plans to spend six months of the year in 
California, where he will establish a home, 
and six months in his coffee plantation in 
Africa. Lady Carbery is the bride of a year. 
She is a French girl, born on African soil 
and educated in a French convent. 

— Richard Schwerin of San Mateo was in 
a party made up of George Rose, Colonel 
Gibson and W. K. Coe, which spent the 
week end at Del Monte. 



At Feather River Inn 

— The handicap gold tournament for men 
was won by F. L. Dettman of San Francisco. 
The prize was a silver loving cup. The run- 
ner-up was R. W. Wright of San Francisco. 

— The handicap golf tournament for wo- 
men was won by Mrs. E. Cofer of Mill Val- 
ley. First prize was silver trophy. Miss E. 
Faxon of Palo Alto was runner-up. 

— There will be another handicap golf 



of Feather River 
Silver trophy for 

around Feather 
re forty-two with- 
better than right 
the fly and many 
getting the limit 



An Appreciative Public 

The grill luncheon at the Fairmont Hotel 
is a thing appreciated by the man of busi- 
ness. Here he may get away from the noise 
and the bustle of down town activities and 
have a quiet, relaxing meal in pleasant com- 
pany and away from the unbeautiful and 
hard surroundings of the business center of 
the city. It is astonishing how appreciative 
the public has shown itself and how the 
luncheon attendance is increasing. The Fair- 
mont Hotel is really only five minutes' ride 
from the business center and as far as noise 
and bustle is concerned it might as well be 
500 miles. There is a vast deal of comfort 
in lunching amid the restful surroundings 
of such a magnificent hostelry. 



Mining in California 

This is a pamphlet issued by the Califor- 
nia State Mining Bureau. It is the monthly 
chapter of the State mineralogist, covering 
mining in California and the activities of the 
State mining bureau. Those interested in 
mining in California will find matters of 
greatest interest in these pages. 



HOTEL PLA7A 

JAN FRANCISCO 



DINING-ROOM 

Remodeled 

and newly opened 

to serve you 

Breakfast, 

Luncheon and 

Dinner 

at moderate prices 




VACATION NOTICE 

Subsrrit'.r* dr-irln* th« Sun Irnnri-rn News I ctt.r fnrw arilnJ 

to their Rummer eddreu Murine the \ amnion period should 
piion i DO CO LA 8 fi«53 

Or Write to the Office, SSS Mont p..ni,-ry Street No <\tra rlinrcr tor thU terries 

SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 29, 1922 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gougrh 
Telephone Park 271 



The Automobile 



hislory. On that day 305 cars were pro- 
duced in nine hours. 



"SAVE YOUR TEETH" 

SPONGY, BLEEDING AND SORE 
GUMS ARE WARNINGS OF 

PYORRHEA 

Treat yourself at home with 

PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 

Package with directions postpaid 
for $1.00 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

908 Market Street, at Powell 
San Francisco 

Please mention News Letter 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
Freneh and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OTJR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. Leidesdorff 



Dr. Susan Harris Hamilton 

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Specializing in nervous diseases 

ST. PAUL BLDG. 291 GEARY ST. 

Hours — 10 a.m. to 12 m., 2 to 4 p.m. 
Phones — Douglas 226, Prospect 15 



The Cotati Races 
The races at Cotati on August 6 promises 
to bring great attendant crowds. The drivers 
are all stars in autodom. The event is a na- 
tional championship and the drivers will go 
150 miles to win. Thrills are promised from 
start to finish. Interest centers on this event 
as important on account of the rivalry that 
exists between the men who will guide the 
cars over the course. The track itself is a 
fast one and records should be broken. Un- 
doubtedly it is destined to be one of the 
automobile racing events drawing one of the 
largest crowds in attendance of the whole 
year. 



Saving the Engine 

Many are the devices adapted to an auto- 
mobile that in their proper use save the 
engine, but nowhere in the machinery used 
to drive the car is a saving made so easily 
as by the adoption of the proper kind of 
oil rings. Those who are familiar with the 
use of oil rings know that the usual idea 
is to make these rings fit so closely that it 
will wipe the oil down the cylinder wall 
against its course of travel. All oil rings 
wear and more especially when they depend 
on great friction to remove oil. This means 
a continual grinding of the piston ring and 
the cylinder walls and the resultant residue 
is passed back into the crank case, making 
a grinding past of it. This makes it certain 
damage will result. Prior to the invention 
of the Economy oil ring all oil troubles were 
fought through the unsatisfactory friction 
method. The Economy oil ring is so con- 
structed that the oil is allowed to circulate 
back into the crank case, thereby eliminating 
friction and residue. Owners of cars will 
find it of advantage to consult the Economy 
Piston Company at 112 Market street, San 
Francisco, or 1028 South Flower street, Los 
Angeles. 



New Anderson Model 

J. G. Anderson, president of the Ander- 
son Motor Company, has just let it be known 
that a new Anderson model, six cylinders 
with aluminum body. Continental motor and 
other standard units, is to sell for $1195. 

Mr. Anderson stated that the new Ander- 
son Six will be built in three body styles, 
five-passenger touring, roadster and coupe. 

"For more than a year designers and en- 
gineers have been busy perfecting our latest 
creation," stated Mr. Anderson, "and for 
several months we have been trying our best 
to tear up test cars of this model over the 
worst dirt, clay, sand and mountain roads 
this country affords. We have been unable 
to find a weak spot in the finished product, 
however, and as a result expect to be in 
production in a few weeks' time. All other 
Anderson models will be continued," con- 
cluded Mr. Anderson. 



Output of the Hudson Motor Car Com- 
pany and the Essex Motors on June 20 
reached the largest number of cars ever 
made in one day by the companies in their 




WE KNOW HOW 

Your car is piling up a big repair bill 
every mile you drive without proper 
lubrication. You can depend upon 

LOYAL AND EFFICIENT SERVICE 
at the 

DE LDXE GARAGE & SERVICE STATION 

Post and Hyde Sts. Phone Franklin 3 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Watch Your Feet 




Weak, fallen or broken arches reduce 
your efficiency, cause headache, back- 
ache, sciatica, pelvic and stomach trou- 
ble, as well as other ailments. 

THE POST SYSTEM 

for foot correction restores the flexi- 
bility and resiliency of the feet. 

The Post System for Foot Correction 
259 Geary Street, San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6147 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital.. 
Reserve Fund 



Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept., 1921 




.$ 25,000,000.00 
.. 17,500,000.00 



. 25,000,000.00 
.$ 67,500,000.00 



.$359,326,760.00 



OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

359 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, 

Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of 

Australasian Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of Calif., National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bk., Crocker Nat'l Bk. 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1922 

Assets $76,170,177.18 

Deposits 72,470,177.18 

Capita] Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - - - 2,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund ----- 385,984.61 

A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4 54 ) percent 
per annum was declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3/4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Vp Capital J15.000.000 Total Anal* Ot«t J4T9.000.000 $15,000,000 Beaerre Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 



San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 
of Automobiles 



We Stand for the Best in Business 
Training 



Munson 




School 



For 
PRIVATE SECRETARIES 

6 00 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 3 06 
Send for Catalog 

BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 
No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.).... 75c 

Dinner. Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. $1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



How the Economy Oil Ring Saves 
Oil and Keeps it Clean 




ON the upstroke of the piston the oil in the 
tapered space around the top of the ring 
acts as a wedge, forcing the ring to spring 
in and all the oil to pass by. On the downstroke, 
the oil is collected from the cylinder walls by the 
sharp edge above the groove, passes thru the 
gates of the ring and is drawn thru the holes 
drilled in the piston into the crankcase by the 
vacuum created therein. 

This method of CIRCULATING the oil retains 
its viscosity and lubricating qualities, which are 
destroyed by the friction when wiped by other 
rings of high tension. 

When properly installed the Economy Oil Ring 
will give 1200 miles or more to the gallon of oil. 



ECONOMY PISTON RING CO, 



112 Market Street, San Francisco 
1028 South Flower Street, Los Angeles 



Today 

order - 

Caswell's 

^^NAIIONAI CREST 

(offee 

Dont deprive yourself 

^ihij delicious 1 coffee 

any longer 

1.800,tf00 cupf^ere served 
attha PANAMA- PACIFIC 
Memaliorul EXPOSITION- 




Telephones 
Sntter 6654 — Oakland 1017 



Daylight 

or Night Service 

— TO — 

Yosemite National Park 




DAT LIGHT 

i.v. San j'riinriMi) (Ferry) 

Olner 



Ar. 



I.v. 

Ar, 



8:40 a. m. 
7 : 15 p. in. 



I.uriih 

YuHfinile Valley 

tQHT 
Sun Francisco ( Ferry) 

Breakfast ut Herced 
\ oeemlte > alley 
STANDARD SLEEPER FOR MER 
t Open for occupancy ui Oakland 
p. in. and at MiTicil until 7 : 30 : 



CED 

LMer 
in.) 



$19-50 



ROUND 
TRIP 



On Sale Friday and Sal nrduy until Sept. 
30. t il for re l urn within 15 day. 



$20- 75 



ROUND 
TRIP 



On nali* dully until September 30 

Good for n't ur ii within 3 month* 
(but not lalt-r than October 30) 



Our Agents Will Gladly Furnish You Further Information 

Southern Pacific Lines 

50 Post St Ferry Station Third St. Station 

Phone Sutter 4000 






Established July 20, I8S6 




L 



PR.CE, CENTS JAX pAYERS WE EKLY *»™™* 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 5, 1922 



LOS ANGELES 



J 










SANTA CLARA COUNTY 

63 Acres For Sale 



Ideally situated. Gently rolling. Beautiful Las Uvas creek, 
never ending water supply, runs for one-half mile through center 
of property. Bungalow, tank house, small orchard, thousands 
of cords of wood along creek. Forty acres can be cultivated- 
Nine miles from Morgan Hill on Las Uvas road, or twenty- 
one miles from San Jose via Almaden road. 



Price $9000 



Apply Owner, Room 382 
235 Montgomery St., San Francisco 



£>mx iFrattrisrn QHprnntrl? 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 

A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



Best Equipped and Most MODERN 
GARAGE West of Chicago 

The Century 

Tiro Blocks from Union Square 

675 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Between Taylor and Jones 



FOR EXCEPTIONAL FOOD AT 
REASONABLE PRICES 

UNITED SERVICE 
RESTAURANTS 

and BAKERY 

UNIQUE SERVICE 

At Table or Counter 

Attractive Fittings 

Comfortable Surroundings 

NO TIPS 

22-26 CALIFORNIA STREET 

A Block from the Ferry 

TURK AND TAYLOR STREETS 

A Block from Market Street 



Independent Buyers' League 

furnishes its MEMBERS with 
ANYTHING sold at whole- 
sale at wholesale prices. 
Be a Member 

Independent Buyers' League 

833 Market St., Room 902 

Phones Douglas 1203-120-1 



Eyes 

Bother 

You? 



Guaranteed 
(3n(3 Work at 

27 7th St. 

DR. J. P. JUHL 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
n?' ° r may we have our representative 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



GUARANTEE 
BATTERY CO. 

Master 
Automobile Electricians 

— and — 



California 




MARK 

955-975 POST STREET 

San Francisco, California 



NOTICE 

In the Superior Court of the State of Calif. ►ruin 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. 

In the matter of the application of the San Fran- 
cisco News Letter and California Advertiser, 
to be declared a newspaper of general cir- 
culation under the provisions of section 446U 
Of the Political Code of the State of Callfoi nla. 
Notice Is hereby given that Frederick Marriott 
filed in the above entitled court a petition 
alleging that the San Francisco News Letter and 
rnia Advertiser, is and ever since July 
20 i s56, has been a newspaper established, 
printed and published at regular intervals, 
namely, on each Saturday, excepting the Sat- 
urday following the great fire of April 18, 1906, 
Cor the dissemination of local and telegraphic 
and intelligence of general character and 
having a bonafide subscription list of paying 
subscribers, and that it has been declared to be 
a newspaper of general circulation by decree 
of the above entitled court given in or about 
the year 1880, but that the records thereof have 
been destroyed and asking that it be adjudged 
and decreed to be a newspaper of general cir- 
culation within the- provision of s-_-ctii.n Mt'.n 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Said order will be applied for befon Deparl 

ment No. 1 r.f the above entitled irt 

upon Tuesday, September 2. 1922, at the hour 

of 10 a. m. at which time and place any person 

interested may appear and show cause if any 

(hey have why said petition should not be 

granted. 

1 fated June 28, 1922. 

FREDERICK MARRIOTT. 
C. I". Adams. Attorney at Law, 703 Market St. 



CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 



me 

MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON - 
process. . 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Quality 1866 — 56 Years— 1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

llurhnirame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mu Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866 
Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.. SATURDAY, AUGUST 5, 1922 



No. 5 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



Df 



-Ferry siren greets Hiram Johnson. Yes, the siren makes a lot 



— Hearst advocates public control of anything and everything — 
except newspapers of course. 

— San Francisco's sky line in fifty years will not only rival that 
of New York, but will surpass it. 

— We have not noticed the word "drafted" or "normalcy" being 
used the last two days. What's wrong? 

— Napoleon said, "There are no Alps." It's taking a long time for 
the city to say, "There is no Rincon Hill." 

— Registrar states registering every four years would save money. 
Voting right once in a lifetime would do the same thing. 

— Johnson has not yet announced his platform. Why lose votes 
— one can always tell the public what it might have been. 

* * * 

— Northern California is the garden of the world, but even a plant 
pot needs a little effort now and then in getting the best results. 

— Local film house shows film demonstrating Eskimo living on 
nothing. Local taxpayers have similar problem as starving Eskimo. 

* * * 

— Hearst undt Hiram will now sing the national anthem: "Both 
for each of us and each for both of us." Chorus — repeat first verse. 

* * * 

— Bootleg found in Pyramids. Must be well aged and they say 
Pharoah was quite a connoisseur. Boats report heavy bookings to 

Egypt. 

* * * 

— Daily newspapers can now leave type standing for week-end 
auto accidents. "Recklessness with regularity" seem lo be a popu- 
lar slogan. 

* * ¥ 

— One man will have the power to appoint five men to spend 
$500,000,000 of your money without restriction if the power bill 
passes. If you have any money it won't pass, and if it does pass 
you won't have any money. Quod erat demonstrandum, as Mister 
Euclid says. 



— Never strike a man when he's down. Wait till he gets up 
and hit him again, he will then have further to fall. Arabic prov- 
erbs No. 756. 

— Mr. De Valera probably finds packing a rifle and running around 
the Hibernia isle a little different from collecting money for Republi- 
can bonds in this country. 

— Man hikes 20,000 miles, says headline. He must have been 
the father of seven children, and we bet the walking was all done 
between 9 p. m. and 9 a. m. 

— Many business buildings having been cleaned show remark- 
able improvement in their appearance. Funny what a little soap 
and water does, even for brick and mortar. 

— Why do many down town business houses possessing clocks 
for public convenience allow them to run down, or become slow? 
Perhaps friend husband needs a constant alibi. 

— What I did when I was governor may be interesting informa- 
tion. But the voters want to know what a man did when he was 
senator, when he is campaigning for that office. 

— What is a labor union? A labor union is an organization 
created for the purpose of handling a strike on an organized basis, 
for the propagation of safe jobs for business agents. 

— History A. D. 1952. Teacher what is a city? A city, my 
child, is a center of population where there is an Owl Drug Store, 
a United Cigar Store and a Bank of Italy on the corner of every 
block. 

— If anybody in Berkeley gets hit, hurt or hoodooed, the papers 
will blossom out with: "U. S. Student Gets Struck, straafed, or 
spiflicated." No headline is complete without the collegian atmos- 
phere. 

S * * 

— Riding academy horses become unionized and strike. They 
demand hay and a half for overtime. With double oats on Sun- 
days, and a colt apprentice to carry a saddle when the rider is 

overweight. 

* * * 

— Fifi Widener's husband (such is fame) gets a column and a half 
because he gets up at 7 o'clock and goes to work in a factory. 
The average man is lucky if he gets half a column if the factory 

blows up with him in it. 

* * » 

— Watch the mining news in the state. Indications point to a 
very big revival in gold mining. Will there come another '49? They 
say history repeats itself. Why not? The possibilities are here if 
we only develop them. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 5, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




For a man who has had the experience in 
The Same Old Gang politics that Hiram Johnson has certainly had, 
he has shown a great capacity for coining 
phrases which have served to do the Senator great harm. His origi- 
nal coinage of "a man must eat" did not defeat him for office, but 
it did alienate a lot of very goods friends who had a faith in the 
man and his works. Now, he has opened his mouth again and placed 
his pedal extremity in it. He charges that opposed to him in his 
candidacy ior the senatorial seat is to be found "the same old gang." 

Somebody, several somebody's in fact, has taken the trouble to 
look into it to find out if that statement is true and it is quite ex- 
traordinary how the "same old gang" stacks up under investigation. 
It has been found that the "same old gang" has quite disappeared 
and that a new gang, if so it may be called, has sprung up in op- 
position to the progressive Senator, who has progressed into the 
class that, having to eat, he has taken to eating out of the hand 
of Hearst. This and other things have made a new alignment nec- 
essary and logical, and some of the old gang, a good many of 
them, will be found right behind Mr. Johnson and doing all they 
can to prosper his candidacy while numerous others who formerly 
were of his army of supporters are trying their best to prevent his 
return to the Senate. And, obviously, his close association with Wil- 
liam Randolph Hearst and the advocacy of his election by that 
prince of periodical publishers is not doing the Johnson so-called 
boom any great good. 

The Los Angeles Times is getting a great deal of satisfaction in 
showing up the hypocrisy of the Johnson attitude. In its issue of 
the 28th it publishes a very striking cartoon, showing William Ran- 
dolph Hearst entering the gates of a depot, with Hiram at the rear, 
carrying a number of satchels and cases, all labelled W. R. H., and 
the cartoon is entitled "Hiram Johnson's Return." But one of 
the mirth provoking items published in a rather tame campaign 
is that in this issue of the Times, in which that journal publishes 
a list of twenty-three vice presidents who were to have sat on the 
platform at the meeting welcoming him home to California, and 
these twenty-three are credited by the Times with being members of 
another redoubtable old gang who formerly so very strenuously 
backed Johnson and who are now opposed to him. 



Senator Johnson has had some questions 
Unanswered Questions fired at him by nine voters of this state, 

who were formerly ardent supporters of 
the Senator for any office to which he might aspire. These ques- 
tions are pertinent, it may be the Senator will think them imper- 
tinent, and the questioners still wait for his reply. Senator Johnson 
is asked, among other things, if he is heartily in favor of the Vol- 
stead act; why did he fail to vote on the Esch-Cummings bill; did 
he receive a ten thousand dollar fee from William Randolph Hearst; 
did he receive a fee of twenty-five thousand dollars to render legal 
service to the Democratic city administration of New York city while 
he was serving as a Senator from California; was it by his single 
and unaided effort that California was given a protective tariff and 
did any of the other representatives of California figure in this mat- 
ter at all; is he still opposed to the Southern Pacific in politics; 
if he is fighting the same old gang, why are so many of the old 
gang fighting so devotedly to re-elect him to office; what is his at- 
titude to the third party movement; will he support William Ran- 
dolph Hearst for President in 1924, and if Hearst is not a candi- 
date, will you accept his support for yourself for the presidential 
office; and the final question is somewhat of a clincher — in con- 
sideration of your registration as a Republican in California and 



Mr. Hearst's affiliation with the Democratic party in New York, what 
consideration or considerations obtained for you the enthusiastic 
backing of the Hearst publications in California? 



The signers of this list of questions 
The Signers of the Questions are all of them solid and respectable 

citizens of the state and they are 
apparently not afraid to make their names as being responsible for 
the asking of these questions public. They are Mrs. Bertha L. Cable, 
John W. Kemp, Mrs. E. C. Bellows, S. C. Graham, Mrs. Florence 
Collins Porter, Mary S. Gibson, Ralph Arnold, John W. Hart, Mrs. 
Christopher M. Gordan. Most of these have been in the fore front 
of the Progressive campaign movements in California in the last 
few years and many of them have figured on committees having 
the object in the past to elect Johnson to some office or other in 
the gift of the people. Signing this questionnaire serves many pur- 
poses, but it serves one more than any other and that is to make very 
plain the fact that the so-called Progressive element is no longer 
behind its erstwhile prophet. 



That is the way the Mexicans speak of one 
The Guest of Honor Bielaski, accused of self-kidnapping by the 

Mexican authorities. Mr. Bielaski, who was 
formerly in the employ of the Department of Justice of the United 
States, went to Mexico recently and he is accused of having had 
himself kidnapped. Why? The Mexicans do not say. Some of his 
party being Mexican citizens have been apprehended and are in 
jail waiting trial. Bielaski has taken refuge in the embassy of the 
United States and dares not stir outside its sacred precincts. We 
do not know how long he will stay there. That depends upon 
whether he can make any impression, through his friends, on Mr. 
Hughes, or whether he can induce the Obregon people to let him 
go from Mexico. One thing is certain, the American embassy must 
protect him as long as he remains within the shadow of its roof. 
It is about as certain that Obregon will not limit his efforts to pun- 
ishing Bielaski for his alleged trickery. It is said this was an effort 
to thrown obloquy on the Mexicans and part of a plot to make all 
sorts of propaganda against Obregon and his party. It is also sure 
that Mr. Hughes, that man of facts and common sense, will not 
allow himself to be swayed in favor of Bielaski, if he feels that 
Bielaski is guilty. So all we can see in this situation is the con- 
tinued residence of Bielaski as the "guest of honor" of the American 
nation at Mexico City. 



One street car system instead of 
One System Would Pay Better two would not only pay the peo- 
ple but the company better than 
two. The inconveniences of a double system are so many that it is 
useless to retail them here. Here is an instance: The other day a 
family arrived over the Coast line of the Southern Pacific Company 
and desired to reach the ferry from the Townsend street depot. They 
all piled on a car — father, mother, three little sisters and one young 
man. The conductor courteously gave them transfers to Market 
street cars. Arriving at Third and Market the family boarded a car 
ferry-bound but when they presented their transfers were told they 
were not good for the trip to the ferry. They paid their fares over 
again and it was not until long afterwards in discussing the "hold 
up," as they called it, with their relatives in Oakland, that they 
were told of the nuisance of a double system down Market street. 
If this happens once in a day it must happen a hundred times and 
there are few persons who would stop a car and take another on 
account of a nickel expenditure, but it is a great annoyance and 



August 5, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



a double tax just the same. And this matter is only a minor an- 
noyance. If the municipal lines would buy up the Market Street 
system it would please the people of San Francisco more than any- 
thing else that could be done just now. 



safe to believe that once started in the "Correspondence Club" the 
New Foundlander, of both sexes, will not have time to be lonesome. 



The man of money is the man who has money 
When Money Works and who usually makes an intelligent use of 
that money in making it work for him. The 
phrase does not at all apply to the man who has a little money or 
some money, but to the man who uses his capital in a large way. Of 
course, where a large amount of money is involved the factors 
governing the employment of such money are much more carefully 
gone into than where smaller amounts are involved. 

For the latter reason, and for many others almost too numerous 
to mention, the investment of money in bonds and stocks today is 
almost reduced to a science in which the element of chance is to 
a much larger extent than is generally believed lacking. And that is 
why the first preferred 6 per cent stock of the Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company is looked upon with such favor by those who are 
experts in the line of appraising the value of such as investments 
by those having larger capital.. Although within recent months a 
very substantial advance in the prices of all kinds of securities 
has been made, this company has maintained its price of $87.50 
per share for its first preferred 6 per cent stock. At this price it 
yields 6.86 per cent to the investor. Considering the safety attached 
to this stock, it would seem the company would be justified in ad- 
vancing the price. 

It is the large amounts of money, thus carefully invested, which 
build up the country and in this particular instance it is of special 
interest that the investor not only helps in building up every sort 
of industry and calling in California, but in all the territory served 
by the Pacific Gas and Electric while at the same time helping 
himself and adding to his wealth through his investments. It isn't 
a question of an array of figures to prove the earnings of this com- 
pany, which have been continual, so much as it is a showing of 
how the company has gradually become the mainstay and encour- 
agement in all kinds of development, industrially and otherwise, 
within its vast territory. This territory is one of the largest, if not 
the largest, in the world served by one company. And when we 
say served we mean served successfully. Within the last five and 
one-half years the company has expended more than fifty-eight mil- 
lions of dollars for new hydro-electric plants, transmission lines, gas 
works, and other additional facilities to serve the growing popula- 
tion in the territory in which it operates. 



The catch line "Don't Be Lonesome" is found 
Don't Be Lonesome in an advertisement up in far New Foundland, 

reads: "Men! Girls! Don't be lonesome. We 
put you in direct communication with French girls, Hawaiian, Ger- 
man, American, Canadian, etc., of both sexes, etc., who are refined 
and charming, and wish to correspond, for amusement or marriage, 
if suited. Join our Correspondence Club, $1 per year. 4 months' 
trial, 50c, including full privileges. Join at once or write for full 
information," and then follows the address of a woman with a most 
romantic dime novelish name, who resides in somnolent Brooklyn. 
The thought which surges to the reader is the thrill such an adver- 
tisement must give the poor fisher lads as they sit mending their 
nets, or as they moon along the beaches, or the daughters and wives 
of the ilk as they sit and spin the heavy woolen mits and com- 
forters for the winter. What a vision is contained in just the little 
etceteras? Here is whole romance left to the imagination. It looks 
funny to you but to the New Foundlander. man or woman, it is 
like lifting up a curtain for a peep into the gay wicked world at 
large. And what a chance for that delightful collection of "both 
sexes" waiting to pounce upon the susceptibilities of the poor Ca- 
nadians who may have been taken in by the advertisement. It is 



If the German mark keeps on going the 
The Descending Mark downward path it is safe to say that it 

will soon catch up with the fleeting ruble 
and beat it in the race toward absolute uselessness. There seems 
a desperate purpose in the way the mark is descending in value and, 
in view of the fact that the German authorities are printing more 
and yet more of this paper currency, unbacked by anything of 
value, it looks as if the great industrial princes were bent on achiev- 
ing two ends at the same time. Germany is a manufacturing nation 
and most of her manufactures are sold abroad. Hans and Gretchen 
and all the rest of the workers of Germany are paid their wages in 
paper marks which are fast becoming valueless while the product 
of their hands and their brains is being sold abroad for gold. The 
German manufacturer is making real money and paying paper 
money for it. At the same time Germany is being pushed about as 
fast as possible along the lines of national bankruptcy, which will 
bring about an occupation and administration of Germany, as a 
whole, by the Allies, that will relieve these manufacturing and com- 
mercial princes of all responsibility for the terrible condition they 
have themselves brought about. There is an alternative, of course, 
and that may be found in a revolution which will sweep everything 
before it and cause havoc in every direction, bringing about inter- 
vention and occupation anyhow. 



Booster campaigns are beneficial to the 
The Booster Campaigns community but they should not be under- 
taken with the idea of gathering in a lot 
of money and then to expend that money in propaganda among 
a chosen few in the community which is to be boosted. That has 
been entirely too often the case and others, who would be per- 
fectly willing and able to help along the good cause, are left won- 
dering how it is that a few are always favored while the many 
are always neglected. Those who have the disbursing of booster 
funds seem to rely strictly on the principle that to him who hath 
shall be given and that the fellow who hath little or nothing shall 
have that little or nothing substracted from him. Some judgment 
should be exercised in these matters of expending money, volun- 
tarily contributed for a purpose of advertising the city or the state 
abroad, and there should be no favoritism shown in the selection 
of organs to be used. The weekly press, for instance, rarely bene- 
fits through such disbursements and there is no good reason why the 
weekly newspapers should not get their share of the disbursement. 
They fill particular fields. It has been argued that weekly news- 
paper circulations are usually small in number of subscribers, but 
that argument has little or no value when it is taken into considera- 
tion that readers of weekly newspapers remember what they read 
and that advertising in weekly newspapers has been tested and found 
not wanting in returns. It is hoped that the new campaign, which 
has been started on the ashes of the old B. B. movement, will not 
be started wrong and kept on the wrong track by people with pre- 
conceived notions that only their particular friends are entitled to 
any of the money which is to be spread out in the work that is ahead 
of the managers. Weekly newspapers do, all of the time, a great 
work in advertising the city and the state and they are entitled to 
this recognition and, if they do not get it, they should make plain 
their displeasure at the tactics of the committee having the cam- 
paign in charge. 



— The coal and rail strikes are getting groggy on their pins and 
next week, unless the labor leaders give in. something is going to 
happen that will give them the knockout. It will be government op- 
eration until they are ready to acknowledge that insurrection by 
labor unions does not pay in this country. 



6 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER August 5, 1922 



v I Points for Property Owners I ▼ 



w 



ill3B1IMiaHlgl ^ l « li ri^ 



BY MONTGOMERY SMITH 



PROPERTY is responsibility. It is responsibility because it cre- 
ates new duties for the owner, duties that he never knew any- 
thing about until after he became the owner of property. Owning 
property begets a greater care in one's duty to yourself and gives 
you a vastly different idea as to your duty to your neighbors and 
to the community in which you live. As a property owner you be- 
come a sort of privileged stockholder and it is to you the dividends 
are paid, which are derived from community advancement and it is 
mainly from you that are taken extra assessments to pay for com- 
munity backwardness. 

Strange as it may seem, the property owner is sometimes directly 
responsible for this backwardness in communities. And stranger 
still, it is not often that property owners take steps in concert to 
improve the conditions in communities so they may profit through 
these improvements. The property owner is essentially individual- 
istic and, usually, too, he is blindly selfish about almost every thing 
he does. 

His responsibility is, however, something he may never shirk 
and he is followed by the nation, the State, and the community, 
everywhere and in every one of his ventures, with a view always 
toward collecting toll for the special privileges he is supposed to 
have earned through his proprietary rights in land. The proprietor, 
on the other hand, is always busy, in one way or another, trying 
to avoid the payment of this toll, any of it or all of it. He knows 
he is the special prey of the tax gatherer and he avoids taxes when- 
ever he can find any kind of an excuse to so do. His tax return 
is nearly always a lying statement, in one or another particular. 

He nearly always gives his consent to improvements only grudg- 
ingly or in many instances on the bridge as courageously as old 
Horatius and defies those who would take from him a payment for 
the cost of government. 

It is not peculiarly or particularly a trait of the proprietor to 
object to the payment of taxes, but it is certainly a trait of hu- 
manity in general. Very few are willing to admit that government 
is necessary that property may be the real and the valuable thing 
that it is. 

It is natural and logical for the property owner to complain if 
the laws are simply expressions of tyranny so designed as to draw 
as much as possible out of the property owner's savings in pay- 
ment of taxes, but instead of doing anything more than complain 
about it the property owner rarely, if ever, takes steps to remedy 
the laws when they bear much too heavily upon him. His interest 
in government is best defined as something to swear about and 
complain and not as something to take in hand and remedy and 
make more business-like in administration, more effective and more 
just to all concerned. The proprietor is much too busy attending 
to his individual affairs to give anything more than a passing notice 
to the affairs of all of us. And among that "all of us" there are to 
be found an almost innumerable army of people who have never 
felt the joys and the agonies of proprietorship, who lie awake 
nights thinking of ways and means to take from him who hath — 
the proprietor. This army of geniuses is constantly busy, and it 
must not be supposed the great majority is not gifted with an un- 
usual amount of cultivated brains and a wonderful capacity in an 
executive line, and in consequence, when this is coupled with an 
ability to write and an extraordinary fluency of speech, grinding 



out new theories and new laws for the guidance along as narrow 
a path as possible of the individualistic property owner. This army 
does not work in an individual way, it usually works around in- 
dividuals and with them in a community way and very effective, too. 
From this army comes the ideas, good and bad, that bedevil the 
property owner. And the property owner occupies a like position 
to that taken as regards the tax levier and collector. He swears 
at the geniuses with long hair. He damns them up hill and down 
dale and does nothing at all in common to stay them in their cam- 
paigns and in their wolfish attacks on that which he holds to his 
breast as his property rights. 

From this army has come to be the idea that property is not 
yours. That it is loaned you during your life time, that you have 
no right to will it away, after you die, and that it is the duty of 
the State to tax it or dissipate it out of your possession, just before 
and after your death, through laws devised for that purpose. Some 
of the most eminent jurists in the land have held this as a good 
and true principle and that property is merely loaned the individual 
and that he does not own it outright. 

There are many responsibilities attached to the ownership of 
property, and the most important of these is that the proprietor 
should band himself with his fellow proprietor and defend his rights 
in these matters. 

The property owner overlooks or minimizes his responsibility to- 
ward the community and toward his co-proprietors. The owner of 
a small holding is a perfectly good fellow usually and he makes 
the ideal citizen but when his holdings become larger he often 
loses all sense of proportion and takes the position that he is an 
exalted being entitled to rights that do not at all apply in the case 
of the small householder, owning his small home. 

It is not a thing difficult at all to show that property owners, 
having large holdings, are often a detriment to themselves and 
others, in fact to the whole community, because of the very fact 
their holdings are so very large. Everyone has heard of people who 
are "land poor." Land poor people stand in the way of all im- 
provement in the communities in which the land they hold is sit- 




Pasteurized 



Modesto 
Creamery 
&<o$$:»jA m Butter 

V*^ REGLSTEKE'l 



.D**Z~ 



Churned Daily nl Mo«Jfnto 



The Old-Established Brand, now being Distributed by 

FRED L. HILMER CO. 

Davis and Sacramento Sts. 

Beware of Imitations. Ask your grocer. Insist 
upon the Original Modesto Creamery Brand 



August 5, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



ualed. Property holders are prone to let land lie idle while other 
property owners around them give value to this vacant property. 
In suburban districts this is especially true and whenever improve- 
ments are proposed owners of large tracts may almost invariably 
be found preventing these being made. These large holdings act as 
a deterrent to development and hold communities in a stagnant 
state for years. And when these large holdings pass into the hands 
of estates they become a curse to the community in which they 
are located and to the heirs who are to inherit whatever may be 
realized from their sale. Administrators of estates generally stand 
strongly against anything like improvements of a public nature, 
which might cause extra taxation to be levied on the property they 
are at that time administering. The administrator has usually no 
sort of an idea of the responsibility large holdings occupy as re- 
gards the community in general. Administrators are not to the 
same extent as proprietors free agents in such things and know that 
their incumbency is, or should be, more or less short in such duties 
and are anxious to make a record as to what they may have ac- 
complished. 

IP tf. tfi 

Sometimes, as in the case of very large holdings in lands in what 
may be called country districts, the administration of estates comes 
as a relief to the rest of the State, as compared to the awful em- 
bargo resting on the State as long as the original proprietor still 
lived. This is the case today when thousands of acres of the most 
valuable tillable land 1 along the lines of a railroad had been held 
for years and years as ground over which to fatten cattle and for 
that purpose alone. Now the administrators of the estate are sell- 
ing this land and making it available to cultivation. It is more than 
propable that the development of the interior of California has been 
held back for more than fifty years through the policy followed by 
these holders of vast landed estates who would not sell and would 
not improve the property thus held. We do not wonder that people 
have felt impelled to look with favor upon those who propose to 
tax these vast lands to such an extent the proprietors could no 
longer afford to keep them as a feeding ground for cattle. The 
owners of these lands had evidently no idea of any responsibility 
to the people of the State, or to the State, or themselves, and yet 
were good citizens and law abiding. 

The duties of the proprietor of land are manifold and the space 
allowed does not permit handling the subject in a manner it deserves. 
The rights of the proprietor are manifold and many times the prop- 
rietor is treated harshly and unjustly because of the fact that he 
does not defend these rights. 

Holding land as property is the strongest one of the factors giv- 
ing endurance to government and making it possible to hold prop- 
erty as a right. It is therefore property holding which must be 
defended in order that government may endure but the property 
owner should act intelligently as to his rights, and the rights of 
others, and he should remember all of his responsibilities as to others 
and as to himself, and that these responsibilities should be thor- 
oughly understood and weighed in the most impartial manner for 
the'benefit of all concerned. 



TO SHINGLE OR NOT TO SHINGLE 

California lumbermen have started a State-wide campaign to de- 
feat the State Housing Act, up for referendum at the November elec- 
tion, which denies the citizens of any incorporated community in 
California — city, town or village — the right to build homes with 
shingle roofs. This course was decided upon at a meeting of the 
Executive Committee California Lumbermen, because the anti-shingle 
clause, inserted so adroitly that it was not discovered until after Gov- 
ernor Stephens had signed the measure, is manifestly unfair to lum- 
ber interests of California. 

When it was learned that under the act, as signed, home-builders 
would not be allowed to use shingles on the roofs of their houses, it 
was too late for any change. The Commission of Immigration and 



Housing of California, under whose jurisdiction the State Housing 
Act is enforced, publicly repudiated the act, and Paul Scharrenberg, 
chairman of the commission, has written the opposition argument to 
be used in the referendum fight. Under the act nothing but "ap- 
proved" patent roofing can be used and the clauses are so worded 
that the smallest shack would come under the provisions of the law. 

The State Housing Act is Senate Bill No. 288 and was introduced 
in the last Legislature by Senator Lester G. Burnett of San Fran- 
cisco. After describing "semi-fireproof" buildings as those which 
must make use of "approved" patent roofings, it includes every home 
within corporate limits in California with the following clause: 

"Every wooden building hereafter erected in any incorporated 
town, incorporated city, or incorporated city and county shall havei 
the roofs thereon constructed of the same kind of material and in the 
same manner hereinbefore provided for semi-fireproof buildings." 

Indicative of the awakening when the true import of the bill be- 
came known, is the fact that, in the twelve days left in which a 
referendum petition might be filed with the Secretary of State, 
53,000 voters signed the petition. 



A JEWELLED ANKLET BRIDE 

San Francisco is not really proud of the fact that she has pro- 
duced many queer characters in her short history. Among the many 
in this galaxy is the Bride With the Jewelled Anklet. This par- 
ticular bride was quite recently the wife of Tartoue, the eccentric 
French artist. 

Tartoue did not have a monopoly in his family for eccentricity. 
I can remember calling on him, at his Westchester county residence, 
and in the party with us were several ladies. The Anklet Bride 
apparently did not like one or more of these representatives of the 
fair sex, so she took to her bed and sent down word to the as- 
sembled company that she was not in. True to his eccentric traits, 
Tartoue carried on the entertaining of his guests as though no wife 
existed and after a plunge in the Sound, on Tartoue's private beach, 
the party returned to dine at the Tartoue home and found the wife 
"peeking" at them through the curtains of her bedroom. Now this 
rather handsome woman has been adopted by and is likely to in- 
herit the title of a countess. It is said she has been married four 
times. 



Classy Apartments 
For Sale, $36,000 

Rents $5,280 per annum 

6 APARTMENTS of 4 rooms each, 
hardwood floors, steam heat, wall 
beds; inviting lobby; building in fine 
condition, near Bush and Jones. 

Only $11,000 Cash 

required for these down town 
apartments 

ADDRESS 382 RUSS BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 5, 1922 



A MERITED APPOINTMENT 

Arthur C. Parsons, who is very well known along insurance row, 
and stands exceedingly well with business men generally, has re- 
cently been given the appointment as manager of the Pacific Mutual's 
San Francisco agency of the life department. He assumed full charge 
on the first day of August. George R. Tryner, who stepped into 
the breach when Mr. Kilgariff passed away last November, con- 
tinues with the title of assistant manager. Mr. Parsons came to 
California at so youthful an age that people have forgotten he was 
born in Nebraska. It was in San Francisco he received his educa- 
tion and his whole experience has been in the business world, per- 
fecting himself along organization and selling lines. He has a wider 
acquaintanceship than most men in business in San Francisco and 
this has proved an invaluable asset to him as he is well liked. Mr. 
Parsons will infuse renewed energy and stimulate the initiative of 
a corps of men, who are already noted for their achievements in 
their particular line. 



A CAPABLE JUDGE 

Any judge showing a capacity to serve the people rightly and 
who seems possessed of the qualifications making him a jurist of 
value, because of his poise and his knowledge of the law, should 
be kept indefinitely in office. Our method of selecting judges is a 
very deficient one and that is an additional reason why, when we 
hit upon a man who proves himself fit for the office while in the 
office, we should keep him there for life or until such time as he 
has shown himself unworthy of our trust. Such a man is Judge 
Troutt. He is now a candidate for the superior court judgship — 
send him back there. Vote for James M. Troutt for the superior 
Court. 



The Pacific 

Mutual Life Insurance Company 

of California 

Announces the Appointment of 

ARTHUR C. PARSONS 

as MANAGER of the 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH OFFICE 

155 Montgomery Street 



Effective August I, 1922 



— The Lily Love of the Poet of the Sierra's daughter has been 
divorced from the fair Juanita. She said he was "too tired to work, 
too tired to pay the bills, too tired to love." Oh! shucks, what a 
man! 



— Seattle, always modest, rises to remark that some day it will 
be the second largest city in the United States. Why not the 
largest? Did Los Angeles object? 



— Let us try to keep down the crime record. We can afford, in 
this instance, to allow every city in the country to beat us to the 
finish. 



— In every direction the failures abound as to municipal. State 
or national control and operation of utilities. Where do the en- 
thusiastic upholders of public control get the stuff that makes them 
that way? 



A New Telephone Directory 

For San Francisco and Bay Counties 

Will Go to Press August 10th 

Please arrange for any change you may desire in present listings or 
advertising as soon as possible and not later than August 10th 



The Pacific Telephone 
and Telegraph Company 





August 5, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




mm 

fkar&Cnerl Wbe tin devjart Ootif 
One tUl UiUpUy lie tktil.sir. n&yut 

— There is absolutely no reason why there should be the regular 
catalog of deaths and maimings in automobile accidents occurring 
from Saturday to Monday, and these could be reduced to a minimum 
if penalties adequately punishing offenders were attached in every 
case. Nearly every accident occurring may very easily be shown to 
have been avoidable. We read of a man driving his machine 
straight at a lumber pile; another man runs over a little girl; another 
wrecks his machine, and five people are now in danger of death; 
hundreds are injured every Saturday to Sunday. Most of the time this 
is due to reckless driving, driving by people who are incompetent, 
driving by the intoxicated, the reckless or the foolish. "Cutting in" is 
a practice responsible for a great many minor accidents. Speeding 
has killed more people in the past than anything else. Two weeks ago 
a man endangered his own and his passenger's life by running a race 
with a train for a crossing. 

— It is noted that the enterprising supervisors have in contempla- 
tion the extension of the municipal car lines into districts which it is 
said by authorities will not yield a revenue. Instead of figuring prob- 
able profits the experts figure certain losses by these extensions. San 
Francisco is deep enough in debt as it is. If the city owned the 
Market Street Railway system enterprise might be shown extending 
lines now impossible of extension by the present owners because of 
the impending 4 per cent law. There are many extensions which 
might be built to the old U. R. R. system and many connections might 
be made with a certainty of profit. Why go butterfly chasing after 
further losses in the operation of the municipal line? Mr. Shaugh- 
nessy is to be commended for pointing out the certainty of losses 
through extensions in non-paying territory and he should have a vote 
of thanks. 

— And, speaking of this reminds me of the remark of an erst- 
while president of one of the big transportation lines, after visiting 
San Francisco. He said: "You are away behind the times, as far 
as rapidity in handling crowds is concerned." If his remark was 
founded on real knowledge of the situation fifteen years ago, what 
would he have said now had he been alive? Until within the last 
two or three months practically no change had occurred since the 
remark was made at Oakland mole. Speaking to a traffic man of 
internatioal reputation recently the writer asked him what he thought 
of the way a certain ferry service was handled. The traffic man 
smiled and said that, at that particular mole, no genius could have 
studied out a better plan to lose time, coming and going. 

— Regarding the campaign to find out how to relieve the con- 
gestion on the roads leading out of San Francisco there is but one 
answer — more roads. A little while ago and there was a very gen- 
eral complaint that there were not enough ferry boats to carry pas- 
sengers and automobiles away from San Francisco. This applied 
especially to that section reached through Sausalito. It was con- 
tended by those who had the monopoly of traffic that it would not 
pay to put on more boats. Two rival boats are now running to ca- 
pacity business and the old company is making more money than 
ever. The new boats created new business and the old company 
rubbed its eyes and woke up and is now giving its competitor a 

lively run for the ever-increasing trade. 
* * * 

— And, by the way. if you want a revelation in the quick han- 
dling of traffic just take a trip over on the new ferry boats of the 
new line. And watch the deck hands, as they move around on that 
boat and at the dock. That is some quick loading and unloading. 



— It has just occurred to me that there should be some form of 
punishment invented to reach the criminally inclined pervert, who 
makes useless and discordant noises of any kind. Noises are pois- 
onous. That has been established beyond a doubt. What shall 
be done to the individual who takes particular pleasure in playing 
havoc with the ear drums of everyone withing five hundred or more 
feet of his or her automobile by emitting therefrom every sort of 
noise it is capable of manufacturing? I do not believe the Inquisi- 
tion possessed a cruel and develish enough punishment for this kind 
of an offender. There is absolutely no excuse for splitting the air 
with the exhaust from automobiles and this practice does no good 
whatever to the machine and certainly does the public great harm. 

* * » 

— And, now, another one of the Whitneys has brought the family 
name before the public by what is termed a sub-rosa alliance with a 
woman, who is striving for movie "honors" in Los Angeles. And there 
is a boy baby, too. To add to the publicity value of the alleged facts 
it is related that mother and child were at one time slated for an exile 
in Europe, on a regular retainer for that purpose. Now, the fat is in 
the fire and there is trouble. At the same time the young lady in New 
York, who is said to be engaged to young Whitney, says that she isn't 
at all interested in Miss Fontaine, the alleged mother of the alleged' 
babe. The engaged young lady further says that such incidents 
should not be allowed to tarnish a great name. What? 

— We have heard of the "aristocracy of labor," but when it is a 
case of the plasterer it is something more than that. A contractor 
friend who is finding it harder and harder to secure the proper help 
has at last thrown up his hands in despair. Last week he needed 
plasterers and, after much difficulty, secured the help he wanted but 
when it came to the question of pay he was floored by a demand for 
fourteen dollars a day. Watson, the needle! That isn't at all a case 
of aristocracy, it is autocracy. 

— The great cry, which was raised by a good number of people 
in Japan and the United States, has died down to a mere whisper 
and now the two nations have come together and have a pact and 
the convention will be put into effect immediately. So Yap is no 
longer a thing or a place to yap about and resolves itself into a 
small atom in the mid-Pacific upon which is located a cable sta- 
tion and upon which lives a handful of beggarly natives, who would 
be much surprised if they could grasp the idea that their little 
island had been a question for an international conference and a 
lot of bombastic gesticulation and bloviation by yellow and white 
"patriots." 

— Let us have more light on the proposed water and power law. 
The more it is studied the more obnoxious it becomes. Forums should 
be established in every city, town and village of the State, at which 
its supporters might present their case and those who oppose theirs. 
There isn't much doubt as to the result of such an exposition of the 
attempt to create a great big pap-sucking political vampire would 

be. 

* * * 

— An embargo should be declared against placing any of the Mc- 
Cormicks, or their collaterals or affinities, in the news items of the 
day. This should be made to bear against the one with the new 
glands or the one who is always "waiting at the church" for Con- 
trary Mary. We are suffering from too much McCormick. 

* * * 

— We are asking Great Britain to put a stop to rum running, 
indulged in between this country and the Bahama islands. Con- 
sidering the immense profit there must have been in it in the past 
and the prospects for the future that is a good deal for Uncle Sam 

to ask. 

* * * 

— Los Angeles plans another movie house. Wait till we get the 
radio picture invested. Then we can see our movies at home. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 5, 1922 



laaaiiiaigEiiaaHaa MMMHM^ 

D©etoir§ Waited: /A 




ppny q 

l§giaHS]|liaHllSB[SI8EiaSSSllffl 



lw Civic Leara 



BY CHARLES F. GALLAGHER 



A FEW years ago the Civic League of Improvement Clubs of 
San Francisco was an honest, conscientious aggregation of 
improvement clubs willing to fix the holes in the street, see that 
your locf.l lamp gave forth its nightly light, registered a kick or 
two when the skip-stop system was installed, registered a whoop or 
two when it was discontinued, saw to it that the sewers smelt not 
too strong, nor that the city government spent too much, that is from 
the Civic League's viewpoint. And so long as the league stayed 
with the streets, and the lamp posts and the parks and the street 
cars, the midnight watchman could wend his phantom way along 
the roads of progress and let the sleeping world know that "all was 
well." 

But then the Civic League went a housecleaning; it selected the 
police courts, and plied a wicked broom, and from the bar of jus- 
tice many a clattering pot has fallen. So far so good, if they had 
only stopped there or gone back to the lamp posts, but no. The 
malevolent disease of cranium expandata or an enlargement of the 
human organ, ordinarily used for the deposit of hats and caps 
when exposed to the outside air, occurred. The Encyclopedia Har- 
monica (jazz edition) would call it swelled head. The political 
bee, lighted, stung, and strongly infected, and since that time — 
zowie! If they had only stayed with the supervisors, and far into 
the night held their caucus of caucuses, which swung in the bal- 
ance the tax rate, and everything else that the candidates studiously 
avoided. But no, they reached on and up, like Shakespeare's "Bot- 
tom the Weaver" they took on a fearsome appearance, strange and 
unusual. Till today the street sweeper sweeps or does not sweep 
as his humor listeth, the lamplighter lights his flickering lamps, as 
he homeward plods his weary way and leaves the world in dark- 
ness. And the Civic League, ah, it is busy with other things. Into 
the limbo of small happenings went the petty politics of yesterday, 
and now the butcher, the baker and the candlestick maker gird 
their loins, and waving the butcher knife aloft, cry in well oiled 
unison, "bring on thy Senator," but alas and alack, instead of the 
bleating animal of public opinion, fickle and wavering, the stock 
selected for the sacrifice is brought on, already cut up, parcelled, 
wrapped, sealed, signed and delivered, and marked with a neat 
little tag in the corner: "For Mr. Hiram Johnson." Back in the 
White House in Washington, trepidation must abound, one can al- 
most see, President Harding with his cabinet, his counsellors, the 
leaders of the party, gathered together, awaiting the result, over 
special leased wire, of the senatorial recommendations of the Civic 
League. For why, oh, next year, there may appear the words on 
the wall: "Mene, Mene, Tarkal, upharsin — Behold, Behold, thy 
days are numbered," and those who misguide the destinies of the 
league will probably be deciding who shall be a fit candidate for 
President at the next convention. But will the league stop there? 
Not on your life. Russia pauses in its onward sweep of bolshevism; 
France turns its war-tired eyes toward this city, Germany proposes 
to let the Civic League solve its reparation problem, England, on 
good authority, has instructed Lloyd George to turn the Irish ques- 
tion to the Civic League for full and final settlement, Italy has 
asked its ministers to take out a membership in the league to get 
the benefit of its ideas on immigration, the Orient stops in its yellow 
scramble for internal adjustment, and awaits the ponderous, ma- 
jestic tread of the officials of the Civic League, and will the Civic 
League falter in its responsibility to the peoples of the earth? No, 



sir! Not while the gavel holds out — and then the planet Mars offers 
a world of speculation, its peoples, if any, its politics, but let us not 
get too far afield, leave that to the league. And in the meantime, 
in between time, the Fillmore Improvement Association, the Mis- 
sion Merchants and the Park Presidio Club have decided to let 
the Great Moguls of the Civic League, fix the world, but if the 
bumps are not taken out of their particular pavements, and a new 
coat of paint put on sundry safety stations, there are going to be 
some new jobs seeking candidates in the very near future. Now 
the Civic League has a definite, effective place in the sphere of 
civic improvement, and it ought to stay where it belongs. But just 
as long as it holds the opinion that it is incumbent upon its po- 
litically-mad helm guiders, to remake the United States Senate and 
interfere in affairs far too weighty and grave, to be settled by a 
group of improvement clubs, then the Civic League begins to weave 
its own shroud. It has gone endorsement crazy. It has grown from 
a chrysalis to a butterfly, and not content with doing its bit, it 
casts its eyes to the proud eagle in its lofty eerie, and attempts to 
soar to the heights above, and outsoar the king of birds. Let the 
Civic League be content with the good work it has done, and well 
done, and it will contribute much to the advancement of our city. 
When it departs from its natural functions, it contracts a danger- 
ous infection, and in its present frame of mind, a civic doctor is 
needed. Who will perform the operation? 



SUPPORTING TRANSPORTATION AMENDMENT 

The commercial and civic organizations of forty-eight cities of 
California are reported as favoring the better transportation move- 
ment of the California Real Estate Association. This is the trans- 
portation amendment, which will be the last item on the November 
ballot. The measure proposes to unify the regulation of all local 
and interurban transportation in the state by means of giving the 
Railroad Commission power to grant franchises to such public util- 
ities. 

Such a move would prevent the haphazard forming of transpor- 
tation companies, either by electric traction or for motor buses for 
either passengers of freight, or both. Realtors contend the passage 
of this measure will promote a more healthful growth of communi- 
ties and that it will further the "Own your own home" campaign. 
Some go so far as to state that the adoption of this measure will 
do a great deal to make more effective the city beautiful idea. 

There is no doubt at all that given the rapid growth of Cali- 
fornia we should look very studiously and seriously into any mea- 
sure which may be proposed as affecting ordinary rapid transit of 
goods and people and for that reason this amendment should have 
the studious attention of every voter in the state. 



— The redoubtable Bielaski is detained in Mexico, pending the 
arrival of evidence from the United States that he kidnapped him- 
self. It would be a good idea to keep that evidence on this side of 
the border in cold storage if that will ensure Mr. Bielaski a con- 
tinued residence in Mexico. 



— The government is getting ready to operate not only the coal 
mines, but the rail lines, until such time as the owners and the 
strikers come to their senses about obeying government injunctions 
and advice. 



\ 



August 5, 1922 



Sunbeams 



She: I have done you an injury. I feel that 
I must undo something. 

Embarrassed Young Man: Do you — er — 
want to be alone a moment? 



Virginia : George says ill-health always at- 
tacks one's weakest spot. 

Friend (sweetly) : You do have a lot of 
headaches, don't you, dearie? 



An Atchison little boy asked his father 
what "seniority" means. "Seniority, my son," 
replied the father, "is what keeps your dad a 
brakeman." — Kansas City Star. 



Gentleman, escorting lady (to roadhouse 
proprietor) : Have you any good mushrooms? 

Proprietor: Waiter, show this gentleman to 
one of our private dining rooms. — Princeton 
Tiger. 



Frances: Could you love a girl like me? 

Francis: Yes, darling, with all my heart. 

"Would you mind waiting a few minutes 
while I call my roommate? I have another 
date tonight." — Texas Scalper. 



Mr. Worrimore: You shouldn't have 
brought your jewels with you. There is a 
gentleman bandit said to be working this part 
of the road. 

His Wife: If he's really a gentleman he'll 
never find them where I've hidden them. 



History Professor: Can any of you tell me 
what makes the Tower of Pisa lean? 

Corpulent Ida: I don't know or I'd take 
some myself. 



"I've got to go out and look for an apart- 
ment." 

"I congratulate you, old man. You're go- 
ing to have a chance to learn something 
about the geography of our fair city. — Judge. 

"Lots of girls say they would rather dance 
than eat." 

"But they don't mean that. You gotta buy 
supper for 'cm." — Louisville Courier-Journal. 

A kind-hearted woman was visiting a 
penitentiary. "How came you in this unfortu- 
nate position?" she asked one of the inmates. 

"I was working in a bank, mum, and — ' 

"Oh, I see," she interrupted. 'How long did 
you work there before you got into trouble? 

"One night, mum." 

First She : That awful person goes around 
telling everyone he kissed me. 

Second She ■ Well, there's no harm in that, 
is there? 

First She: No. but it isn't even true! — 
Kasper (Stockholm). 

North: Do you think that golf will ever 
be successfully played indoors? 

West: No; you can't lose the ball.— New 
York Sun. 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 
TRUTH ABOUT ELECTRIC RAILWAYS 

The American Electric Railway Associa- 
tion of New York has issued a small booklet, 
which may be had upon application to J. W. 
Walsh, the executive secretary, at & West 
Fortieth street. New York, which should be 
in the hands of every San Franciscan, if not 
of every citizen in the country. This book- 
let gives facts about street railways that the 
people generally should know. So much mis- 
information is peddled about that is harmful 
to all concerned making the booklet a long 
felt want. 



II 



THE LUNCHEON DE LUXE 



Those who make it a practice to eat as 
they run will probably have to learn to enjoy 
a meal in the quiet and serene surroundings 
of luxury. At the Fairmont, just five minutes 
ride from the noise and the turmoil of busi- 
ness, the office man may enjoy a luncheon 
prepared by a chef, who has under his com- 
mand men who have given the great hotel 
a world-wide reputation. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



"Timothy," demanded Mrs. Toddlebury, 
"why do you always wear those horrid 
smoked glasses when we go to the beach?" 

"Why, my dear, the glare from the sand 
hurts my eyes," explained her husband. 

"Nonsense! I believe you wear them so 
that I can't see which way you are looking." 



St. Mary's 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 




SAN FRANCISCO LAW SCHOOL 

FOURTEENTH SCHOOL YEAR 
Beginning September 6th, 1922 

Evening Sessions for Men and Women 

A Legal Education Is of Inestimable 
Value in Any Vocation. 

Call or Write for Information 

Third Floor, Cull Building 

74 New Montgomery Street 

Kearny 4251 



MILLS & HAGBOM 

New Location, ALEXANDER BUILDING 
155 Montgomery St., Cor. Bush 



REDWOOD LODGE and BUNGALOWS 

IN THE HEART OF THE SANTA CRIZ MOUNTAINS — Established 1859 

A ROMANTIC RESORT FOR WEEK-END AMI PERMANENT OUEST8 — FAMOUS FOR 

HOSPITALITY — GOOD MEAI.S AND EVERYTHING — 3-HOVR DRIVE OVER NEW EOS 

OATOS-SANTA CRUZ HIGHWAY — OPEN THE YEAR ROUND 

Ask Any S. P. Ticket Acent; See Perk-Judah Co., 811 Market St.. San Francisco, or ( rtil.l r.-t-"-. 
Oakland, or Address A. P. COX. Prop., WRIGHTS. < \l 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 5, 1922 




ociot 




Busy Cupid 

FORMAL announcement was made at a 
luncheon at her home Monday in Berk- 
eley of the engagement of Miss Helen B. 
Smyth to Norman Waterlow Ford of San 
Francisco. The future bride is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. George B. Smyth, who for- 
merly resided in China, but who for the past 
two years have made their home in Berkeley. 
Her brother, Thomas Smyth, now connected 
with the American Legation in China, served 
with the ambulance corps during the war, 
of which Ford was also a member. Ford saw 
service during the war first with the French 
corps and later with the ambulance corps. 
He is the son of Mrs. Alfred Bernard Ford 
and the late Bernard Ford, and a brother 
of Sydney, Bernard, Arthur and Leslie Ford, 
all of whom served with the American forces 
in France. His maternal grandfather was 
the late Sir Sydney Waterlow of England. 
No date has been set for the wedding. 

— Miss Carroll Cambron has chosen Sep- 
tember 30 as the date for her marriage to 
Mr. Stanley Morrison. The wedding will 
be the first society event of the early fall and 
Mr. Morrison's relatives will come from the 
South to be present. The other details are 
not yet arranged. 

— Dr. and Mrs. Lovell Langstroth have re- 
turned from their honeymoon, which took 
them far south, and they moved into their 
new home at 3221 Washington street. Their 
residence was formerly the home of Dr. and 
Mrs. William Boericke, who moved early 
in the summer to their countryside in Mill 
Valley. Before her marriage Mrs. Langstroth 
was Miss Helen Crawford. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John A. Buck announced 
the engagement of their youngest daughter, 
Miss Viola Buck, to Harry Earle Wright, 
formerly of St. Johns, Canada, and now of 
San Francisco. The news was told at a 




Under the guidance of R. H. Collins 
and his associates, the Peerless was 
bound to be a better and better Peer- 
less. The public response came quick- 
ly and is indicated by augmented sales 
in old Peerless strongholds and 
throughout the country in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Comer Washington St 

Telephone Prospect 8800 



luncheon party given at the Buck home on 
Gough street. Miss Buck is one of the heir- 
esses of the younger contingent of society, 
her father, who is one of the pioneer finan- 
ciers of California, being prominent in nearly 
all of the big enterprises that have to do with 
the upbuilding of this state in the way of 
shipping, oil and other industries. She is a 
sister of Walter E. Buck, John A. Buck Jr. 
and of Mrs. Charles Hufschmidt. 

— The news of the engagement of Miss 
Doris Wirtner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John J. Wirtner, to Howard Francis Mc- 
Candless comes as a delightful surprise to 
society here and in the North. The announce- 
ment cards have been withheld because of 
the shocking death of Mrs. Herbert C. Jen- 
sen (Jeanne Wirtner), which occurred sev- 
eral weeks ago in Shanghai. The wedding 
will probably take place at the Wirtner home 
in November. Miss Wirtner is a sister of 
Mrs. Hubert Haven Anderson, Miss Harriet 
Wirtner and the late Mrs. Jensen. Her fiance 
is a son of the Francis McCandlesses of Se- 
attle, and a nephew of James McCandless 
of this city. 

Luncheons 

— Mrs. James B. Howell assembled a few 
friends at luncheon at her home in Menlo 
on Thursday. 

— The Misses Ethel and Helen Lee enter- 
tained at luncheon at the Menlo Country 
Club last Friday afternoon, having ten or 
twelve of their friends as guests. 

— Miss Hope Somerset, whose marriage 
to Donald Walsh will take place across the 
bay in August, was the honored guest at a 
large luncheon which Miss Katherine Bent- 
ley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert I. 
Bentley, gave at the San Francisco Golf 
and Country Club on Tuesday. 

— Miss Emily Crowe, whose engagement 
to Kent Weaver was recently announced, 
was the guest of honor for whom Mrs. Har- 
vey Allen gave a luncheon and bridge party 
on Thursday. 

— Miss Isabel Jennings entertained infor- 
mally at luncheon at the Menlo Country 
Club Tuesday afternoon. 

— Mrs. James Flood entertained a group 
of the Menlo Park summer colony at lunch- 
eon. 

— Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran was hostess 
to Mrs. Alexander Hamilton, Mrs. Lawrence 
McCreery, Mrs. Robert Hays Smith, Mrs. 
Alexander Rutherford and Mrs. Walter G. 
Filer at the St. Francis Hotel. 

— Miss Jennie Blair, Miss Celia O'Connor 
and Mrs. Ritchie L. Dunn were together for 
luncheon at the Hotel St. Francis on Mon- 
day. 

Teas 

— Several hundred guests attended tha 
tea which Mrs. Alfred Bernard Ford gave 
Tuesday afternoon in honor of her daughter- 



in-law, Mrs. Sydney Waterlow Ford, who is 
visiting here from Hokitika, New Zealand, 
and Miss Helen B. Smyth, whose engage- 
ment was announced Saturday to Mr. Nor- 
man Waterlow Ford. The affair was held 
at the home of the hostess in Broadway. Re- 
ceiving with Mrs. Ford, her daughter-in-law 
and her future daughter-in-law, were Mrs. 
Charles Belden, Mrs. Robert Davis, Mrs. 
George Smyth, Mrs. Bernard Waterlow Ford, 
Mrs. Arthur Waterlow Ford, Mrs. Louis F. 
Monteagle, Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz, Mrs. S. 
K. Pittman, Mrs. Willard 0. Wayman, Miss 
Marjorie Pittman and Miss Catherine Pitt- 
man. 

— Miss Kiltie Fletcher of New York, who 
came to California to be a bridesmaid at 
the Walsh-Somerset wedding, will entertain 
for Miss Somerset at the Sprague Magruder 
home in town on Tuesday afternoon, August 
8. 

— Miss Laura Lindsay Miller continues 
to be the motif for a round of affairs and 
entertainments planned in her honor up to 
the day of her wedding, September 6. Miss 
Geraldine Grace, who is passing the summer 
at the Grace country home near Santa Rosa, 
will give a tea at the Palace Hotel August 
1 7 and Miss Margaret Buckbee has issued 
invitations for a dinner dance to be given 
August 25 for the attractive bride-elect. 

— Miss Jennie Stone was hostess at a hand- 
some tea in Laurel Court at the Fairmont 
Hotel last week. 

Dances 

— One of the few large affairs on the so- 
cial calendar of the debutante is the dance 
which the Misses Josephine and Edith Grant 
will give at their home in Burlingame on the 
evening of August 12. The belles and beaux, 
as well as some of the young married cou- 
ples, have been invited. 

— Mrs. Norris King Davis entertained at 
a large dance Tuesday evening at her home 
in Montecito in honor of her two young 
daughters, Miss Nancy and Miss Margery 
Davis. 

Dinners 

— Mrs. Dennis Arnold was hostess at a 
recent dinner party at the Woman's Athletic 
Club, entertaining: Admiral and Mrs. Clar- 
ence Williams, Colonel and Mrs. Irving W. 



ADAMS GOLF CO. 

Specializing 

in 

Golf Instruction 

EXPERT INSTRUCTOR AND CLUB 
MAKER IN ATTENDANCE 



DEPENDABLE SERVICE 



54 Kearny Phone Douglas 7838 



August 5, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



Rand, Colonel and Mrs. William Banister, 
Colonel and Mrs. Andrew S. Rowan, Captain 
and Mrs. Charles Lyman. 

■ — In compliment to Miss Emily Crowe and 
her fiance, Kent Weaver, who are to be mar- 
ried this month, Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Gordon 
entertained at a dinner party on Saturday 
evening. 

— Preceding the dance at the Belvedere 
Country Club on Saturday evening, Mr. and 
Mrs. William Forbes Macdonald gave a din- 
ner at their home at Belvedere. 

— There were several events of interest 
this week down the peninsula. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stewart Lowery gave a dinner Wednesday 
evening, and Mr. and Mrs. Philip Wales en- 
tertained at a dinner Friday night. The 
largest event of the week will be the al 
fresco supper to be given Saturday by Mr. 
and Mrs. Latham McMullin at their home in 
Menlo Park. 

Weed End Parties 

Mr. Frederick Tillman has been enjoy- 
ing a week-end visit in Santa Barbara with 
his sister, Baroness Jan Carel Van Eck, who 
is spending the summer in the South. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Louis Titus motored to 
Salinas for the rodeo days. They were at 
Del Monte for the week end. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kellogg Hutch- 
inson and Mr. and Mrs. Choteau Johnson 
were guests at the Joseph G. Hooper home 
on the Monterey peninsula for a few days. 

— Mr. and Mrs. John Douglas Short, who 
are at Pebble Beach for the summer, had 
as their house guests a week ago Mr. and 
Mrs. Lorin Howard Tryon (Ola Willett), who 
motored down for several days. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Clinton la Montagne 
passed the week end with the Robert Cole- 
mans and the Harold Caseys at Del Monte. 
In Town and Out 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edward Tobin and their 
children, Miss Barbara and Master Richard 
Tobin, returned last week from Del Monte, 
where they enjoyed a fortnight's holiday. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Robert Miller returned 
Sunday from a ten days' visit in Santa Bar- 
bara, where they were the guests of friends. 
Friday they were among the guests of Miss 
Laura Kaime and Alvah Kaime at a dinner 
over which they presided in the Country 
Club. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Jean de St. Cyr, Mrs. 
Lloyd Bowers of Washington and Robert 
Burroughs of New York left San Mateo last 
Thursday for Plumas County, where they 
will visit for ten days at the camp of Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Oxnard. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Ford and their 
three sons, Masters Dick, Robert and Jimmy 
Ford, came up last week from their ranch 
at Merced, where they have been for the 
past two years. They are guests of Mrs. 
Ford's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. 
Davis, in Ross and they will be here until 
school reopens in the fall. 



LEARN COSTUME DESIGN— 

m Illustration — Pattern Drafting, 

rv Making and Designing 

Exhibition of Students Work 
i laaaea De>9 and Evening 

FASHION ACADEMY, Inc. 

Reottlsll Bite Temple 



-utter St. 



—Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Sullivan have re- 
turned from a visit to Del Monte, where they 
passed several days last week. 

— Mrs. S. Louise Bee has closed her 
apartments at the Hillcrest and left this week 
for Santa Barbara, where she will pass the 
month of August with her son, Albert W. 
Bee. 

—-Mrs. George T Marye and her party 
of friends, who went to Salinas for the rodeo, 
have returned. 

— Mrs. Curtis O'Sullivan has gone to Car- 
mel to pass the month of August with her 
mother, Mrs. Joseph Hooper. 

—Mr. and Mrs. William H. Taylor closed 
their home at Palo Alto and returned to 
town Monday. Mrs. Taylor's sister, Mrs. 
William Dolman Inskeep (Lorna Kilgarif), 
who was married in the South last month, is 
making her home at Long Beach. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Oyster and their 
children have returned to town, to open their 
home, after several months at Pebble Beach. 
The Oysters and the William F. Perkins had 
a cottage together at Pebble Beach. Mr. 
and Mrs. Perkins and Miss Helen Perkins 
have gone farther south, and upon their 
return will take apartments in town for the 
winter. 

— Dr. and Mrs. George Ebright have re- 
turned to town after a week's visit at Cata- 
lina. The Ebrights have enjoyed several 
short trips south this summer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Sewall Dolliver and Miss 
Kathleen Booth have returned to town after 
a five weeks' visit in Alaska. 

— Miss Minerva Lovell, daughter of Mrs. 
Mansfield Lovell, returned last week after 
having visited relatives in Honolulu for the 
past year. 

— Mrs. Edward H. Clark has arrived from 
the East to pass the summer in California. 
Mrs. Clark is at the Fairmont. 

— Mrs. Atherton Russell and her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Philip Hum, are here from Holly- 
wood, having motored up. 

— Mrs. Macondray Moore and Mrs. 
Thomas Breeze returned Monday to the for- 
mer's home in Broadway, after a visit of 
several weeks at Lake Tahoe. 
Intimations 

— Mrs. Edward Pringle and her daughter, 
Miss Frances Pringle, will return to San 
Francisco from Santa Barbara this week. 
They have been the guests of Mrs. James 
Hall Bishop for several weeks at her ranch, 
"Corona del Mar." 

— Mr. and Mrs. Samuel G. Murphy and 
the tatter's daughter, Mrs. John Biddle, will 
arrive in San Francisco the end of the week. 
While in town they will make their home 
at the Fairmont. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Schlacks, who 
arrived in California recently with plans to 
pass the warm season here, returned sud- 
denly to Philadelphia, where they were called 
on account of the illness of Mr. Schlacks' 
mother. Mr. and Mrs. Schlacks were at the 
Fairmont Hotel for several weeks prior to 
their departure on Saturday. 

— Miss Lisa Stillman. the attractive young 
daughter of Dr. and Mr*. Stanley Stillman, 
has decided against making a formal debut 
this winter, and though she will take part 



in the various pleasures and activities of the 
debutante set, she will not be definitely pre- 
sented to society. Miss Stillman has just 
graduated from Vassar, where she distin- 
guished herself in her studies and also in her 
contributions to several of the leading East- 
ern periodicals. 



We've often been asked 

why not have something new and stylish 
in glasses? Here they are — "Colonial" 
rimless lenses. They are decidedly prac- 
tical for they afford a wide field of vision 
— combine efficiency with smartness and 
do not emphasize the fact that glasses 
are being worn. 

W . D. Fennimore A. B. Fennlmore 

J. W. Davis 




*» 



wmm 



San Francisco - 181 Post, 2508 Mission Sts. 
Berkeley - - - - 2106 Shattuck Avenue 
Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 



BABYLON 

On the Bay at San Carlos 



The most unique and exclusive re- 
sort for motorists on the Coast 
Babylon's Chicken Maryland 

or Duck Dinners $2.50 

'Breakfasts and Lunches at 

Reasonable Prices 

ZMusic and T)ancing Every Night 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eyebrows arched and moles, warts and 
superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest improved multiple needle ma- 
chine. Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

1.13 Geary Street. Suite 723 Whitney Bldg. 

Phone Douglas 5232 
Oakland, Suite 424, First Natl. Dank Bid*. 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

Make Your Reservations 
at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 
I'nder Management CARL S. STANLEY 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 
• • • • • • 

PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 



JEWELS 



In Platinum 



REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

• • • • • • 
UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

• • • • • • 

FINE JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 

• • • • • • 

EXPERT Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 5, 1922 





By P. N. BERINGER 




AS WE go to press it looks as though 
the rail and the coal strikes were grad- 
ually being talked to death by both sides 
to the controversy with the government hold- 
ing a firm grasp of the situation. If there is 
no greater progress made toward a settle- 
ment of the trouble soon then the govern- 
ment will operate the roads and see to it 
that the coal is mined and shipped in suffi- 
cient quantities to meet the requirements of 
the nation. Here and there, all over the 
country, have been recorded disorders and 
rioting, with more or less damage done to 
people and property. In this State at Rose- 
ville and in Oakland there have been a num- 
ber of quite serious mixups, and a number 
of free working men have been injured by 
strikers and their so-called sympathizers. It 
is notable that everywhere there are disor- 
ders of a serious nature it is because the au- 
thorities are engaged in the task of straddling 
every issue presented to them. 

Despite the rail and coal strikes the coun- 
try is on the upgrade as to business every- 
where. The United States Chamber of Com- 
merce meeting, recently held at Chicago, 
showed that an optimistic feeling was pre- 
valent everywhere and of the delegates pres- 
ent, not one voiced a word of pessimism 
regarding the business future of the country. 
This is quite remarkable, when it is taken 
into consideration that two very important 
strikes are in full operation at this time. 

* ¥ * 

Luxuries are the one class of articles 
among those imported into this country which 
fail to show a big fall off in value in the 
fiscal year just ended. Manufacturing ma- 
terial shows a fall off of 17 per cent in the 
fiscal year of 1922, as compared with the 
fiscal year of 1921. Manufactures as a whole 
show a fall of 22 per cent. Foodstuffs show 
a fall of over 50 per cent when we compare 
the import values of the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1922, with those of the fiscal year 
immediately preceding. Luxuries show an 
increase. 

The intercoastal trade situation is improv- 
ing and the strike seems to have stimulated 
things rather than retarded them. The va- 
rious carrier lines do not show any indica- 
tion of being weary of the struggle at all 
and indeed it looks as though the open war- 
fare was better for all concerned than the 
hidden struggle, hitherto going on, when the 
conference rates were supposed to be in 
force. Some of the lines are carrying all 
they can find room for on board their ves- 
sels. 

Trans-Pacific trade is improving as to 
freight. Passenger trade is holding up very 



well and does not show any tendency to 
drop at all. Trade with the Orient via Ship- 
ping Board vessels would be in better shape 
if the speed of the vessels could be made 
greater. That, at least, is the report of the 
passengers coming in on the various vessels 
lately. The Pacific Mail, it is reported, is 
about to put more vessels on the run to 
Hongkong, having received the allocation of 
two more of the Shipping Board vessels. 

We are approaching real rapid transit on 
San Francisco bay when the diesel engine 
and electric control and driving force is used 
on ferry boats. The Golden Gate was the 
pioneer, to be followed by her sister ves- 
sel, on the run to Sausalito. Now the an- 
nouncement is made of still greater improve- 
ments in speed and convenience in the new 
boats of the Oakland Terminal route. Com- 
petition certainly makes people take notice 
and starts them along the road trying to 
emulate their rivals in business. 

Coastal steamship business is very brisk. 
The story goes that the demand for passen- 
ger accommodations are so great that on 
some of the steamers the management has 
been forced to place beds and lounges in 
the halls and on spare deck room. This ap- 
plies to steamer lines between San Francisco 
and Los Angeles, where there has been an 
imitation of a real rate war going on. 

Plans for the building of a ten-story ga- 
rage of the most modern type are being com- 
pleted in Chicago. The corporation will ex- 
pend a large sum on this building, which 
will be located within a stone's throw of 
the busiest part of the Windy City. The 
corporation is capitalized at $1,750,000, and 
construction on the garage should start within 
the next thirty days. As it is planned, the 
building will house 1000 automobiles at a 
time and can be so arranged as to double 
that amount by adding more floors to the 
building. The promoters believe that it will 
relieve the great congestion existing in the 
"loop district" of Chicago. Some such build- 
ing as an automobile hotel, would pay in 
San Francisco, especially if parking regu- 
lations were more strictly enforced. Street 
parking is gradually becoming very much 
of a nuisance and a time limit should be 
set and rigidly enforced as to parking. In 
the Chicago structure elevators and ramps 
are provided, giving easy access from one 
floor to another. Who is going to promote 
the San Francisco automobile hotel? 

The National Board of Fire Underwriters 
has published in "Safeguarding America 
Against Fire" for July a very interesting il- 
lustrated article, "Fighting Fire — Past and 
Present." 



The California Highway Commission has 
taken steps to prevent truck overloading, and 
inspectors are at work cautioning truck com- 
panies as to this matter. It has been ob- 
served that in those sections where regula- 
tion inspectors have been at work damage 
caused by overloading has been considerably 
lessened, thereby reducing the cost of main- 
tenance of the roads and of the trucks. 
¥ * * 

The United States, through its various de- 
partments, has inaugurated a system of road 
building and maintenance such as has never 
before been attempted by any nation in the 
world's history. The financing of such a plan 
is in itself a most gigantic task and the 
money must be forthcoming from the nation 
and from the states and counties as regularly 
as it is needed. It is believed that a plan 
has at last been adopted which will make 
this possible. The nation will have to bear 
about 33 per cent of this and the balance 
will be raised through state and local taxes. 
A larger percentage will be borne in the fu- 
ture by the actual road user and not by a 
general taxation on the communities. 

A. J. Owen, of the loss department of the 
Liverpool and London and Globe Insurance 
Company, has been called to the East and 
will take up more important duties with the 
company. 

Walter H. Speyer is honeymooning in Ber- 
muda and will return to his desk with the 
New Zealand Fire some time in August. 
* * * 

Webster Jones, the well-known coffee man 
of the firm of Jones-Thierbach Company, 
who had been appointed a representative to 
Rio Janeiro in the matter of the valorisa- 
tion of coffee, is not going on the mission. 
The delegation has been called off and it is 
supposed that the chaotic political conditions 
have had much to do with this decision on 
the part of the National Coffee Roasters As- 
sociation, of which Mr. Jones is one of the 
officers. 

In mining circles all the talk is that the 
year will show up very favorably in gold 
and silver mining activities in both Nevada 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

352 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 



BELVEDERE 

Rent or Sell — Attractive Home 

Eight Rooms, Two Baths, Furnished 

SAN GERONIMO 

Delightful Home, Furnished — Six rooms, 
two baths, old ivory finish throughout ; 
stream, rustic bridges. Redwoods. 

APPLY DR. B. W. HAINES 

Douglas 2433 323 Geary St., San Francisco 



August 5. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



15 



For Sale 



Sixty-acre almond orchard. Trees 
six years old. 3500 Thompson 
Seedless Grapes, 1 to 4 years old, 
between trees. Olive trees on three 
sides. Well, centrifugal pump, gas 
motor, tank house, water tank, and 
small cabin. 

Ranch of 2 acres, well improved; 
17 acres in good stand of alfalfa. 
Family orchard; fruit, berries and 
nuts. 9 first-class milch cows, dairy 
utensils, 4 doz. hens, 1 horse, wagon, 
mower and rake. 

272 acres fine farm land, fruit or 
alfalfa. Good improvements. Nicely 
located. 



JOHNSTON & GRITESER 

336 Call Bldg., San Francisco 

Phone: Douglas 44 56 



VISIT 

"The 
Catecombs" 



AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 4772 



Electrical Repairs, Motor Mainte- 
nance, Electrical Fixtures, Wiring, 
Supplies 

Goldberg & Wilson Electric Co. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS AND 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 

9036 Polk St root 

Phone Prospect 75 2S 

SAN FRANCISCO - - - CALIF. 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

in, EAR. NOSE AND THROAT 
Hours: 2 t 111 4, and by Appointment 

I'h.mr Sutter 1718 

REMOVED TO 

Howard Bnlldlnc, 209 Font Street 

Corner Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



and California. More money has been spent 
and more has been appropriated to be spent 
on re-opening old mines and the exploitation 
of the dumps of old mines in California than 
ever before in the history of the state. And 
a great deal of successful work has been 
going on. 

* * * 

Recently a company was formed in New 
York under the most auspicious circum- 
stances for the purpose of getting gold out 
of the sands and gravel of the Carson river. 

It isn't known here just what did happen, 
but somebody must have thrown a whole 
hardware store full of monkeywrenches in 
the machinery because it had but just started 
when the management called back its rep- 
resentative on the ground and there was some 
kind of a general row and the directors are 
now encamped in factional groups and are 
sitting upon the ruins of a very fair mining 
dream, which did not come true. 

* * * 

The best mining news of the day consists 
in that which comes from the Goldfield Red 
Top Silver Pick lease. Ore of high grade 
tendencies has been opened up on the fourth 
level of the Silver Pick. The ore shoot is 
from three to four feet in thickness and sam- 
ples average a hundred dollars a ton. This 
drift is apparently entering the main ore 
body on the intermediate and above the 
third level. This discovery is credited with 
establishing beyond any doubt the perma- 
nence of the ore body. Four air drills are 
in commission and the company will install 
another compressor to facilitate the opera- 
tion of another battery of drills. The ship- 
ment of ore to the mill continues with reg- 
ularity and the ore averages around $40 a 
ton. 

It is good news to hear that the Shasta 
Zinc and Copper Company is treating 150 
tons of ore daily at its plant near Winthrop. 
This may be taken as one of the most prom- 
ising signs of the times. 

* * * 

Shasta County, Calif., is coming forward 
as a steadily increasing gold producer. Old 
properties are being re-opened and new 
mines have started up. 



The Whole Story ! 

"My gums are a hundred per cent 
better. Find enclosed $1.00 for an- 
other treatment." — Mrs. M. F. M., 
San Jose, Calif. 

Mrs. M. F. M. has been using 

PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's 
Home Treatment for 

Pyorrhea and Sore Gums 

Package with directions postpaid for 

$1.00 

Phone or write today 

DR. W. W. HO AG LAND 

908 Market St.. San Francisco 

(Mention News Letter) 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gough 
Telephone Parle 271 



(25 years in business) Kearny 2842 

ENJOY YOUR VACATION BY 
HAVING YOUR 

HAIR PERMANENTLY 
WAVED 

—at— 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

360 Geary Street 
San Francisco 

We consider the health of your hair. 
Mr. J. and Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to I I p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seems necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or, if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-15 First Street - - San Francisco 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 5, 1922 




PLyDASURI/S WAND 



Columbia 

"Little Old New York" is a pictureful 
play of mighty Gotham in the days of its 
beginning, when its present plutocrats were 
but struggling pioneers and its avenues of 
wealth and industry were cowpaths. The New 
York players present this romantic and semi- 
historic comedy of Rida Johnson Young's this 
week for San Franciscans to enjoy, and they 
are manifestly doing so. Human nature in 
1810 was not an altogether thing from hu- 
man nature of today, and the types com- 
prised in the following notable cast were 
faithfully portrayed: 

Larry Delavan Creighton Hale 

Washington Irving William Lloyd 

Fitz Green Halleck Emmett Vogan 

Henry Brevoort _ Walter Plunkett 

Daniel Reilly John Beck 

Cornelius Vanderbilt John Miljan 

John Jacob Astor Louis Morrison 

Betty Schuyler Camille Moore 

Bunny Waters Frederick A. Thomson 

Rachel Brewster Florence Midgley 

"Bully Boy" Brewster.. ..Walter Scott Weeks 

Ariana de Puyster Dorothy Blackburn 

Michael O'Day Willis Marks 

Peter Delmonico Ancyn T. McNulty 

The Bookmaker .William H. Brown 

Patricia O'Day Isabelle Lowe 

Creighton Hale is a sympathetic and sin- 
cere young actor, but to your critic it seemed 
that the part of Larry Delavan called for 
more dash and a more impressive physique. 
Isabelle Lowe's "Patricia O'Day" was a 
truly delightful performance, twinkling with 
humor and vibrating with emotion. The play 
was well received and should have a good 
season here, for it contains an unusual 
amount of interesting material. 



"Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

ish woman of little means being splendid. 
She has a fine sense of emotional values and 
displays her talent in a most pleasing manner. 
Paul Merrick, Director Anderson and Mrs. 
Jones did good work in her support. 

"The Boor" is a none-too-new theme in 
the caveman style which afforded Miss Sea- 
grave and Mr. Anderson a good opportunity 
to amuse the audience and show their his- 
trionic ability. In between Oliver Alberti 
rendered two delightful violin selections. The 
management has improved in smoothness of 
operation over previous attempts, much to 
the satisfaction of the patrons. The next an- 
nouncement is awaited with pleasant antici- 
pation. 




Pacific Players 

The last presentation by this capable or- 
ganization was by far the most successful 
of their many attempts to give San Fran- 
ciscans real enjoyment in the realm of one- 
act plays. On the evening of July 28 two 
plays were offered, Crocker's "The Baby 
Carriage" and a translation of Anton Tche- 
koff's "The Boor." Miss Buster starred in 
the former, her characterization of the Jew- 



SAN FRAMC1SCO 



\n NA\J0E*\u.fc 



Kog 




M ™ s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Loges 



Alcazar 

For his farewell performance, Herbert 
Heyes is appearing in "Civilian Clothes," the 
post-war play of an "over there" romance. 
The plot is quite interesting and the work 
of Miss Van Buren is particularly good. 
However, the construction is very poor in 
places, particularly at the finish, but the 
lines and opportunity for good acting 
throughout counterbalance the defects. There 
is a large cast engaged in this play and the 
settings have been very happilv selected. Ned 
Doyle as the father is splendid, despite his 
small p?rt, and we are sorry the imitation 
New Orleans porter did not die before en- 
gaged for the part. He should be put in an 
aviary. Emelie Melville as Mrs. Lanham 
needs no praise; she does her usual excellent 
acting. Marie Dunkle has never shown to 
better advantage. Altogether the play is very 
worth while. 



Charlotte Greenwood at Century 

"Letty Pepper" is here and that means 
that the one and only Charlotte Greenwood 
is with us, arms et all We do believe she 
has grown an inch since last time. And all 
the old pep and snap and spontaneity is 
there, too, every bit of it. If the play were 
nil in entertaining value, Charlotte would 
make the show a howling success. Not that 
the scores are not good. It's true there 
might be a few more rollicking melodies 
thrown in, but nevertheless the numbers are 
tuneful, catchy and well done. "Ray of Sun- 
shine" is by far the best, and is tactfully 
retained through the whole show. 

And then the gorgeous dresses. Heeps of 
em. Someone near mentioned they were the 
latest style, and even that person being of 
the other sex, we pass it on for your in- 
formation. Whatever the date, we like them, 
and the girls inside, too. They aren't much 
on the chorus, but as models — better go and 
see them for yourself. 



Orpheum's Gay Week 

All for fun at the Orpheum nowadays, so 
if you don't want to be caught laughing 
you'd better stay away. Stan Stanley's • 
'Theater Episode" is delightfully humorous, 
played by a trio of good actors. Murray and 



Kissen in "The Barber of Seville," offer good 
entertainment and are heartily received. Har- 
ry Fox and Beatrice Curtis continue with 
their "Interruptions" to the pleasure of their 
audiences. The act of Cook, Mortimer and 
Hervey is unique; called "A Ball Game in 
the Dark," it consists of some remarkable 
bicycling and dexterous ball playing. Red- 
monds and Wells have a novelty, too, in 
their "Birds Cabaret," and Emilie Lee, 
dancer, is on the program for her second 
week. Shipman & Lipman's one-act comedy, 
written for Crane Wilbur and his gifted wife, 
Suzanne Caubert, occupies the place of first 
importance on the bill. "Right or Wrong" 
is an interesting little play, well acted. Mr. 
Crane's immense local popularity, and the 
fact that his charming wife is a niece of 
Sara Bernhardt, adds interest to their play- 
let. 



Imperial 

The Mae Murray and Rodolph Valentino 
season is in its second week at the Imperial 
where "The Delicious Little Devil" continues 
to attract large audiences. The Century Kids, 
in their comedy "You and Me," keep the 
laughs going, and Prior's orchestra has a 
program of excellent selections. 



Granada 

The much heralded picture "Human 
Hearts" with its stupendous dramatic and 
scenic effects, its cast of famous players and 
the appearance in person of its director has 
filled the spacious Granada Theater to ca- 
pacity all this week. Considerable patience 
and much physical endurance are required 
to see this great photoplay, and the demo- 
cratic movie throngs wait thousands together 



HOTEL PLA7A 

San francisco 



DINING-ROOM 

Surprisingly good meals 
pleasingly served. Note 
the moderate prices: 

3reakfuH( 25c to 75c 

Luncheon 05c 

Dinner ¥1.25 

(A la Carte Service also) 




August 5, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



17 



for the opportunity — and find that it has 
been worth all their trouble. The story is 
intensely human and the plot is logical and 
well carried through by a company of well- 
known artists including House Peters, Edith 
Haller, Ramsey Wallace, Gertrude Claire and 

»Mary Philbin. King Baggot, to whose di- 
rectorship a large portion of this success is 
due, makes his bow at every performance to 
the interested audience, and he must feel 
gratified by his enthusiastic reception. Paul 
Ash and his merry men give one of their 
hilarious performances, and some dancers 
help to fill the program. 



Mayc, is a young actor of great promise who 
has appeared with many of the distinguished 
stars of the country and recently filled a 
long stock engagement at Portland. 



California 

Zane Grey's "Golden Dreams" is a won- 
der. A highly emotional melodrama, with 
every possible situation and complex brought 
into its makeup, it is a tremendous produc- 
tion, and well acted by a capable cast, with 
Carl Gantvoort, Claire Adams, Bertram 
Grassby and Frank Leigh in the principal 
roles. The plot is an exciting one and the 
thrills are thick. 



Players Theater 

Monday night, August 7, brings the first 
performance of "The First Fifty Years," the 
unique study of married life by Henry Myers, 
to the Players Theater, Bush street near 
Gough. It also marks the return of Evelyn 
Vaughan, San Francisco's favorite actress, 
to the legitimate stage after an absence of 
four years, in what is said to be the most 
congenial role she has ever had. Opposite 
her will be William S. Rainey, recently re- 
turned from a successful season in New York. 
Reginald Travers is directing. 

The play, declared to be astonishingly ef- 
fective, has just completed a season's run 
at the Princess Theater, New York, and is 
offered to San Franciscans through arrange- 
ments with the Shuberts, even before Chi- 
cago, Philadelphia and Boston have an op- 
portunity of seeing it. There are seven epi- 
sodes, the first being the wedding day in 
1872, and the others the various anniver- 
saries down to the golden wedding in 1922. 

The author treats his subject courageously 
but with a delightful humor which is a wel- 
come leaven to some of the more serious 
moments. The production is scheduled for 
two weeks, with matinees on Tuesdays and 
Saturdays. 



Alcazar Next Week 

Booth Tarkington's "Seventeen" will be 
the medium for the introduction by the Al- 
cazar on Sunday matinee, August 6, of Ida 
Maye, pretty, petite and vivacious ingenue 
and Rankin Mansfield, clever and versatile 
juvenile man. It will be the first presenta- 
tion in the West of this stage classic at 
popular prices. 

Miss Maye has just concluded a stock en- 
gagement of several seasons with the Wilkes 
Players in Denver, in which city she became 
a reigning favorite. With Robert Edeson 
she toured the country in his great success, 
"Love Forbidden," and also will be remem- 
bered as having appeared on the Orpheum 
circuit with S. Miller Kent. 

Mansfield, who will play opposite Miss 



Orpheum Next Week 

There is probably no one any better known 
in the show world than Gus Edwards. In 
his newest act, "Gus Edwards' 15th Annual 
Song Re-Vue," Orpheum patrons will see a 
great Broadway production. Harry Carroll 
and the Varieties of 1922 attained such pop- 
ularity in their recent engagement here the 
management has arranged a return engage- 
ment for the one week only. With an un- 
usual talent for making people laugh them- 
selves almost into hysterics, Tom Smith, the 
funny comedian, begins. As the black face 
chauffeur of a rolling chair, Joe Rolley, with 
his excellent material, should be as big a 
riot as he was when last seen here featured 
with Anderson's Frivolities. Princess Radjah 
is said to be one of the greatest dancers. 



— The California Industries Exposition, 
which will be held in the San Francisco Ex- 
position Auditorium October 7 to 28, will 
again be opened with a grand industrial pa- 
rade in which San Francisco, east bay and 
all California manufacturers and counties 
will be invited to participated. Major Jesse 
C. Colman was selected as grand marshal 
of the parade and ordered to immediately 
formulate plans to make the parade the most 
representative industrial pageant ever held 
in San Francisco. All railroads have granted 
a special rate to the exposition from all 
interior California points. With the co-op- 
eration that is expected and already assured 
through participation of the various counties 
with comprehensive exhibits of their dis- 
tricts, the exposition should be the largest 
and most important industrial event ever at- 
tempted in San Francisco to stimulate the 
industrial development in this section of Cali- 
fornia. 



AT DEL MONTE 



Summer polo at Del Monte continues to 
furnish diversion for the gatherings. Im- 
promptu games are being played three days 
a week. Among the poloists participating 
have been Samuel F. B. Morse, William 
W. Crocker, Lawrence McCreery and Harry 
Hunt of Burlingame, George Rose of New 
York, Hugh Drury and Eric Pedley of Del 
Monte, and Major Max Fleischmann of Santa 
Barbara. 

A prominent party which came to Del 
Monte in a special car was made up of Mrs. 
Joseph Widener and Mrs. Albert Pancoast. 
both of Philadelphia; Mrs. Crawford Hill. 
Nathan P. Hill and Buckeley Wells, all of 
Denver, and Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney 
of New York. They spent some time in 
motoring to the scenic points of interest 
upon the Monterey peninsula and in partic- 
ipating in golf on the Del Monte and Pebble 
Beach courses. Mrs. Widener, who was hos- 
tess to the party, is taking in many of the 
interesting points on a tour of California. 

A group of friends who assembled for 
dinner at Del Monte Lodge last evening in- 



cluded Mr. and Mrs. William Parrott, Mr. 
and Mrs. Samuel F. B. Morse, Mrs. Malcolm 
Whitman, Mrs. Selby Hayne, Miss Helen 
Crocker, Count de Limur and Harry Hunt. 

On Sunday evening Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Tobin entertained at dinner, having as guests 
of honor Mr. and Mrs. Francis McComas and 
John Parrott. 



AT CASA DEL REY 

Golf is becoming more popular daily with 
the athletic guests. of the Casa del Rey as 
evidenced by the numerous cars leaving for 
the Santa Cruz Country Club each morning, 
golf bags strapped on. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Erlanger, prominent San 
Francisco folk, were recent arrivals in the 
golfing set, as were also Mr. and Mrs. W. 
H. Garlick, residents of Hotel Cecil, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Bulkeley, Chicagoites, 
spending the summer in California, making 
the Casa del Rey their headquarters. This 
month the annual mid-summer tournament, 
in which cups for all flights figure, will be 
held the 19th, 20th and 21st, on the pic- 
turesque course of the Country Club. 

The Stanley Merritts and Mr. and Mrs. 
E. A. Merritt were an interesting group of 
vacationists, as were also Mr. and Mrs. J. 
C. Harraman and daughter, and Mr. and 
Mrs. George Hauser. 

Mrs. William Thornton White, in com- 
pany with Mrs. Frank R. Brown, both from 
across the bay and prominent in all social 
and civic interests, were recent arrivals to 
the popular Casa del Rey . 

The Misses Myrtle and Isobel Bannon of 
San Francisco have had as their guest while 
sojourning in Santa Cruz at the beach re- 
sort, Mrs. Josephine Wilson of Havana. Mrs. 
Wilson is a San Francisco girl, but has spent 
three delightful years in the tropics, where 
her husband has large sugar plantation in- 
terests. The three attractive women enter- 
tained several naval officers from the two 
Eagleboats lying at anchor the past week 
for dinner and the usual Saturday night ball, 
including Ensign "Bud" Larkin, formerly of 
San Francisco. 



— All of the Bohemian Links camps had 
their parties and some of the most distin- 
guished men of the country were entertained 
at the grove this year. George Wickersham, 
who was United States Attorney General un- 
der President Taft.and Henry Taft came from 
New York for this event. Mr. Taft is a 
brother of the former president. General 
Emile Marie Taufflieb was another distin- 
guished guest, and still others were Harri- 
son Fisher of New York, Frederick L. Olm- 
stead, Wesley Boswell Coe, John Hartley 
Manners, George Horace Lorimer and Dr. 
Henry S. Pritchett. 



— After an illness of several weeks, Mrs. 
Henry T. Scott returned Monday to her home 
in Burlingame. Mrs. Scott was operated on 
more than a month ago and for a fortnight 
afterward her condition was most serious. 
Following her first convalescense, she was re- 
moved to the Hotel St. Francis, where she 
has been since. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 5, 1922 



The Automobile 



The Truck An Ally 

Gradually the truth seems to be impinging 
on the minds of the rail line managers that 
the automobile truck is an ally instead of a 
competitor. R. S. Parsons, of the Erie Line, 
has recently written an article which should 
open the eyes of railroad managers who 
strenuously hold that the truck is the worst 
enemy the -ailroad has. 

Mr. Parsons shows that the truck has 
demonstrated its ability to move freight 
promptly and efficiently. As the public has 
seen fit to provide the road bed, track and 
right of way, without expense, it is the duty 
of the far-seeing railroad manager to make 
an ally of the truck and not place it in the 
position of a competitor. 

Mr. Parsons points out that there are con- 
ditions under which the motor truck may be 
substituted for present-day railroad opera- 
tions: Short branch line operation, trap car 
service, suburban distribution, utilization of 
outlying yards in lieu of yards in congested 
districts, and terminal distribution. 

The suggestion is made that the motor 
truck may be used in industrial or farming 
centers to assemble freight at some conven- 
ient central station. Freight delivery may be 
made by the railroad directly to the con- 
signee or picked up from the consignor. 
There is no limit to the value of motor 
truck service to a railroad at terminal sta- 
tions. 

Rail men all over the country are invited 
to give the motor truck their attention, not 
in an aggressive and unfriendly way, but in 
the manner in which was welcomed the 
semaphore and other innovations which have 
made railroading more rapid and more safe. 



Speedometer Gears Must Be According to 
Tire Sizes 

When changing from normal size to over- 
size tires, it is necessary to change the 
speedometer gear if the instrument is to regis- 
ter absolute accuracy. 

The rule to follow is that the number of 
teeth in the large speedometer gear — that is, 
the one attached to the road wheel — must be 
twice the diameter of the tire in inches. For 
instance, if the car is equipped with 32 by 
3!/2-inch tires, the speedometer gear should 
have 64 teeth. But if an oversize tire — 33 by 
4 — which fits the same wheel is put on, the 
large speedometer gear should be changed to 
a 66-tooth size. 



Insulator for Plier Handles 

When working about the ignition of a car, 
the mechanic may accidentally touch a 
spark-plug terminal and get a very unpleas- 
ant shock. A common method of insulating 
the plier handles is to use friction tape, but 
the following is a better way of insulating: 

Small rubber tubing, just large enough to 
fit the handles snugly, is secured.. Cut off two 
pieces, slightly longer than the length of in- 
sulation wanted, and split one end of each 
for a short distance. Cement the plier han- 
dles and slip on the tubing, leaving the split 



ends projecting over the handles. Cement the 
splits inside and press together tightly, cover- 
ing the ends of the handles entirely. — L. R. 
B., Iowa. 



only the advertising signs that are within 
the bounds of the right-of-way. 



Detecting Cracked Porcelains 

Spark-plugs which are to be cleaned may 
be tossed into a can of kerosene for a few 
hours. This loosens the carbon and makes 
cleaning easier. Then wipe dry and, if de- 
sired to test for invisible cracks,, dip them 
in tire talc or talcum powder. 

If cracks are present, the kerosene will 
dampen the talc and make a dark line. Such 
porcelains should be discarded. — R. W. T., 
Mo. 



Gear Changing 

Starting on second gear to save the trouble 
of going through the gate in due order, is 
bad for the tires. I proved this yast year, 
says a writer, by noting the wear on two 
cars of the same make and type, one of which 
the owner always started on its first and 
lowest gear, while the other owner always 
started on his second speed, if not on too 
steep a gradient. The pattern was torn off 
the back wheel tires of the latter car three 
months or more before that on the tires of 
the first vehicle. 



Indiana Bars "Ads" on State Roads 

Advertising signs must be removed from 
the right-of-way of State highways in In- 
diana, according to a ruling laid down by 
the State highway department. All signs 
other than those of the State highway depart- 
ment or of the Hoosier Motor Club, desig- 
nating the roads, detours and railway cross- 
ings, will be removed. This order affects 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 
FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OCR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. Leidesdorff 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Rroker 

208 CROCKER RUTLDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 




WE KNOW HOW 

Your car is piling up a big repair bill 
every mile you drive without proper 
lubrication. You can depend upon 

LOYAL AND EFFICIENT SERVICE 
at the 

DE LIXE GARAGE & SERVICE STATION 

Post and Hyde Sts. Phone Franklin 3 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
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to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



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Weak, fallen or broken arches reduce 
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THE POST SYSTEM 

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259 Geary Street, San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6147 



I 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 

(ESTABLISHED 1817) 

Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 

Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept., 1921 

OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

359 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, 

Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of 

Australasian Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 2 9 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of Calif., National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bk., Crocker Nat'l Bk. 





MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30tk, 1922 

Assets $76,170,177.18 

Deposits 72,470,177.18 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - - - 2,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund ----- 385,984.61 

A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4U) percent 
per annum was declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 



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BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 
of Automobiles 



We Stand for the Best In Business 
Training 

Munson tfpb/S)] School 



For 
PRIVATE SECRETARIES 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 
Send for Catalog 

BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
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Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.).... 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. $1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

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"Half Dollar" Specials 
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151 Powell Street 




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Casa Del Rey 



SANTA CRUZ 



CALIFORNIA 



The ^Million 1>ollar Fireproof Hotel 



THE ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm 
beach bathing; dancing; good music; artistic, home-like 
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playgrounds; sanitary warm bathing pool; swimming 
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the warmest and most accessible beach out of San Fran- 
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Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also 
under the same management as Casa Del Rey. 

Correspondence about rates for families with maids 
and children solicited. Special rates by the week or for 
extended stays of a month or two. Address: 



CASA DEL REY : : SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 

MORRIS & WAENER, Proprietors. Phone 600 




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p. in. iiml nl .Me reed until ~i : 110 a. in.) 




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80. timid fur return within 15 days. 



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ROUND 
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Our Agents Will Gladly Furnish You Further Information 

Southern Pacific Lines 

50 Post St Ferry Station Third St. Station 

Phone Sutter 4000 






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Established July 20, lsr.i; 








PRICE 10 CENTS „ „ __ $5.00 PER YEAR 

TAX PAYERS WEEKLY 



SAN FRANCISCO 






SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 1922 



LOS ANGELES 








EARLY SAX FRANCISCO (\<». 18) 

Haves Valley In 18«4. The Protestant Orphan Asylum at the extreme upper left. The early site of the present Civic Center is 
to the right of the end of the train disappearing around the hill; the semi-circular building, Hayes Pavilion. The train at the 
edge Of the hill is heading for Haves Valley. The train in the foreground is the old locomotive train that carried old-time 
passengers from Market street to Hayes Valley, and to Willows, a great amusement park in 1S64. Lone Mountain is seen in 
the background, extreme right. 






MILLS & HAGBOM 

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New Location, ALEXANDER BUILDING 
155 Montgomery St., Cor. Bush 



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IN THE HEART OF THE SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS — Established 1859 

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Ask Any S. P. Ticket Agent; See Peck-Judah Co., 672 Market St., San Francisco, or Crabtree'f 
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day 



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including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



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furnishes its MEMBERS with 
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833 Market St., Room 902 

Phones Douglas 1203-1204 



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955-975 POST STREET 
San Francisco, California 



NOTICE 

In the Superior Court of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. 

In the matter of the application of the San Fran- 
cisco News Letter and California Advertiser, 
to be declared a newspaper of general cir- 
culation under the provisions of section 4460 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Notice is hereby given that Frederick Marriott 
has filed in the above entitled court a petition 
alleging that the San Francisco News Letter and 
California Advertiser, is and ever since July 
20. 1856, has been a newspaper established, 
printed and published at regular intervals, 
namely, on each Saturday, excepting the Sat- 
urday following the great fire of April 18, 1906, 
for the dissemination of local and telegraphic 
news and intelligence of general character and 
having a bonafide subscription list of paying 
subscribers, and that it has been declared to be 
a newspaper of general circulation by decree 
of the above entitled court given in or about 
the year 1880. but that the records thereof have 
been destroyed and asking that it be adjudged 
and decreed to be a newspaper of general cir- 
culation within the provision of section 4460 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Said order will be applied for before Depart- 
ment No. 1 of the above entitled court 
upon Tuesday, September 2. 1922. at the hour 
of 10 a. m. at which time and place any person 
interested may appear and show cause if anv 
they have why said petition should not be 
granted. 
Dated June 28, 1922. 

FREDERICK MARRIOTT. 
C. F. Adams, Attorney at Law, 703 Market St. 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO" 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON 
process. , 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Quality 1866-56 Years-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burlingame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodside 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866 
Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 1922 



No. 6 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— It is a very strange sort of week in San Francisco which does 
not show up with one or more conventions going full blast. 

— Some kind of a hoodoo seems to have attached itself to the 
big flyer of the Admiral Line fleet. Wonder if she was christened 
with water? 

— California old guard Republican hymn for Hiram: "Oh how 
I laugh when I think how I cried when I'd voted for you." But 
never again. 

— Business is improving all along the line and there are no lines 
that are exempt. When the strikes are over you will see things 
take a spurt forward. 

— Is the arrival of a fire chief in San Francisco for the fire fighters' 
convention in an airplane to be taken as a sign that fires will soon 
be fought from the air? 

jfr if. S$ 

— And now they are stealing airplanes. We are no longer safe 
in the skies. Somebody may come along and take the plane right 

out from under you. 

* * * 

— The Japanese delegation to Brazil is making a splendid showing 
in San Francisco. No better appearing set of men has ever been 
received at the Chamber of Commerce. 

* * * 

— The automobile industries are enjoying one of the most suc- 
cessful seasons they have ever experienced. It is a moving business, 

just now moving in the right direction. 

* * * 

— Mr. J. P. Morgan makes a present to Uncle Sam of a mansion 
in London for ambassadorial residence purposes and Harvey of the 

silk stockings moves in. Good for Morgan and Uncle Sam. 

* * * 

— It is perfectly safe to assume that Great Britain will try to 
force France to accept the German's terms of payment of the rep- 
aration's costs. England wants France to disarm and the easiest 
way to do this, it is thought, is to stop the German payments from 
being enforced. Without money the French cannot maintain their 
army. The only weakness in Lloyd George's argument is found in 
the fact that he has not taken the French people in consideration. 



- — It is to be hoped that the business man will believe the issues are 
important enough to make him vote at the coming election. Ab- 
stainers from the polls should be heavily fined. 

— It has been said it takes all kinds of people to make a world. 
The world might get on very well indeed without some of the kind 
lately obtruding themselves on our notice — the Castors, for instance. 

— More than sixty cases a day set for hearing this week looks 
as if illicit liquor makers must have been quite busy lately. And 
that doesn't count for hundreds who have never been brought to 
book. 

— The idea is now put forward that the Castor murders might 
not have occurred if the probation laws were not so loosely en- 
forced. Maybe that is so, but it looks as though there had been 
leniency extended to Castor in more than a probationary direction. 

— There is no compilation at hand to show the number of mur- 
ders committed in the past by strikers and their sympathizers. It 
would be interesting to see published, every day, the mounting 
scale of such murders and the last two or three months would be 
a revelation. 

— The striking rail men are trying to establish the fact that, al- 
though by resigning from employment you give up all your rights, 
that by returning to employment you receive some of the rights 
back again, as a reward for disloyalty. And that is why the strikers 

hang on to seniority with such tenacity. 

* * * 

— The air of San Francisco pulsates with wisdom and with en- 
ergy. The wisdom is found in the legal lights here gathered and 
the energy among the firemen. And, don't forget the Pythians and 
their wives and pretty daughters; they furnish the finishing 

touches of culture. Welcome to the city that knows how. 

* * * 

— Mexico has sent the United States a protest, about the mob 
conditions at Herrin on account of the killing of Mexican citizens, 
who were employed by the coal operators at that point. Mexico 
might repeat that protest every time the killing of Mexicans occurs 
and Mexico should be commended for her action and attention paid 

to her protests. 

* * * 

— Henry Ford and Thomas Edison should be forced to give their 
individual attentions strictly to matters which they thoroughly un- 
derstand. The one should bother himself about his automobile fac- 
tory and the other about problems in electricity. When these two 
very popular men take up the question of money and begin advo- 
cating issuing of what is known as "cheap money" they are trying 
to bring us very near to a national collapse, and they do not seem 
to realize that fact. They should be restrained within their realm 
of real capacity. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 12, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




It is never a good thing to straddle an issue. 
Straddling the Issues Better stand four square on what you think 

you have solved for yourself as being right 
than to give way here or there over a question which may have far 
reaching results. Recently there was issued in Washington a book, 
which is tSe sequel to that called "The Mirrors of Washington." The 
book is by the same author and it is called "Behind the Mirrors." 
In this book the author says that President Harding feels that he 
"has to be so very careful." The decision made by the President 
in the case of the rail strikers seems to bear out the statement of 
the anonymous author of "Behind the Mirrors." President Harding 
was evidently so very careful that he could not bear to hurt the 
feelings of the strikers by taking away their seniority rights, so- 
called. A large number of men strike and cripple an industry. The 
strike is made, not against their employers but against a decision made! 
by the Railway Labor Board. After leaving their employment a 
large number of the strikers and their friends attempt to prevent 
willing workers from taking their places on the lines. They riot 
and they browbeat their successors. They defy the government to 
enforce its decision and they question the right of anyone to take 
the places they voluntarily vacated. They knew they had lost their 
seniority when they struck. And they are not entitled to it now that 
they propose to go back to work. The blame lies with the President 
in the fact that he straddled the question and allowed them a right 
which they had so very clearly lost in striking. 



Mr. Ford's Commoner is still devoting a lot of 
Monkeys and Bryan space to the question of our common descent 

from the ape. The Commoner is trying to 
decide whether Warwin was right or wrong, whether he presented 
the idea as a fact or an hypothesis. What is the difference and who 
cares, anyhow? That is, outside of Ford and Bryan and a few col- 
lege professors. Why should we care? A good respectable ape is 
quite as decent an ancestor as most of the humans who have func- 
tioned in a like capacity. Taking Ford and Bryan as proofs of hu- 
man advancement does not seem to disprove the theory advanced 
on either side of this question. If it is any satisfaction to him we 
will vote for and with Mr. Ford because we could not possibly 
reconcile ourselves to voting with and for the "Howling Dervish 
of Nebraska." 



It is apparently becoming quite a question 
Two Lines, Two Costs for discussion that two lines of cars mean 

two lines of fares, a duplication of costs 
and a duplication of annoyances. The duplication of costs acts as 
an additional tax on the citizens. It would be far better if one or 
the other company was out of the way and it is with pleasure it is 
noted that the proposition to buy the Market Street Railway is to 
be revived and some pep put into negotiations. The people have 
been disappointed at the conduct of the supervisors in this matter 
and are looking forward to a different conduct in the future. What 
the people really need and want is one line of street railway ser- 
vice only. 



It is announced from Washington that there has been 
Some Decline a decline of more than half a billion dollars in the 

exports of foodstuffs for the year 1922, as compared 
with the year 1921. This is a very serious decline in exports and 
when this is taken in consideration in connection with other exports, 
which have also declined to a very great extent, the loss to this 
country must run close to a billion dollars for the year. It does 
not look as if we had a proper idea of what our opportunities are 



in this great struggle for the survival of the fittest, and in the com- 
mercial war which is always going on we seem destined to lose 
out to other nations, some of them younger and some of them much 
older than we are in the game. 

Why is it that we cannot fit ourselves to hold our own and do 
better than that as regards export and import trade? What is there 
so fundamentally wrong with us that we cannot cope with England, 
Germany, France, Japan, Argentina and other countries in the 
trade with the world at large? Why is it that we cannot operate 
a merchant marine successfully? The questions are closely related, 
of course, but underlying the whole problem is that of world finance, 
of which we seem to know very little indeed. 



The accident, by which there were thirty- 
The Human Element seven people killed in a train wreck is Mis- 
souri, illustrates how very difficult it is to 
eliminate what is called the "human element" in automatic signal- 
ling. Here was an engineer, who lost his life, through his criminal 
carelessness, who had worked as an engineer practically all of his 
life, who had not one black mark against him in his whole career, and 
who not only disregarded his orders, but who chose to disregard a 
signal as well. 

How can we account for such a thing? We do not and we can- 
not. It is seemingly impossible to eliminate the "human element" 
and the "human element" errs and death and sufferings result there- 
from. 



The frequency of automobile accidents, 
Automobile Accidents especially in that period of time between 

Friday night and Monday morning, is in- 
creasing and the lists of those hurt or killed grow. Nearly everyone 
of these deplorable accidents are avoidable. In nearly every in- 
stance we can trace the cause to the drivers of cars. And there is 
no reason why the number of accidents should not be cut down far 
below what they are at the present time. We lessen the opportunity 
for more accidents by a rigid enforcement of road laws and the 
heavy fining of those who deliberately break them. 



That is about all it will be, although called for 
The London Parley important considerations. Great Britain is 

trying to cause France to take a more lenient 
attitude toward Germany and is attempting to cause France to dis- 
arm. France, on the other hand, aims to hold Germany strictly 
to account and will not budge from the position she has taken. Great 
Britain will, most probably, be backed by Italy, while Belgium will 
most probably side with France in this controversy. Great Britain 
is anxious to have the whip hand over France, not only in a com- 
mercial sense, but in every other way. No statesmen know Germany 
as well as do the French, and France will not disarm, not as long 
as there is any danger of a sudden attack from the German side. 
That danger is present now and the menace from Germany is more 
acute today than it has been in some time. 



And still they come. We mean the delegates to the 
Conventions various meetings and conventions in San Francisco. 

We have had the firemen, now it is the Pythians, 5000 
strong, and then we shall have the Bench and Bar. Taft will be, 
here and the erudite Wickersham will speak. Bring em, San Fran- 
cisco knows how to entertain them and send them home with a 
pleasant smile and a promise to come again at the very first oppor- 
tunity. 



August 12. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



The strike situation has been much improved. 
The Strike Situation The coal and the rail strikes are moribund 

and the latest developments are to be found 
in an appeal made by the brotherhood unions that the cars and en- 
gines are unsafe to run in a run-down condition. It must be expected 
that the unions will hang together and that they will make every 
effort to assist the strikers on the rail lines by every possible means 
falling short of an actual strike by the brotherhood unions. 

The coal strike is on its last legs and it is only a question of a 
little while unless something unheard of happens when the coal 
unions will call the strike off and go back to work. 

And, if the expected does not happen, the government will seize 
the mines and roads and operate them. This should have been done 
in the first place. 



Evidently in General Wu Pei Fu China has 
General Wu Pei Fu found a man among men. He does not seem 

to be afraid to say just what is in his mind 
and that something is always to the point and wise and for the good 
of his country. General Wu now takes the Chinese nation to task 
for not making the proper effort to carry out its agreement with 
Japan as to the Shantung railway. ' He says that China is apathetic 
as to Shantung and its restoration, after having made a political 
pow-wow over it. He calls attention to the fact that Shantung is the 
cradle of China's culture and religion and that China has pledged 
herself to redeem the railroad from the Japanese by a public sub- 
scription, but that the Chinese people do not seem to care a rap 
about Shantung or anything else that matters. He declares China 
is an unresponsive nation and that it now faces humiliation. 



Keepers of restaurants, who are so squeamish they 
The Navy Men will not allow a man in the uniform of Uncle Sam's 

navy to eat in their places, should be disciplined 
very severely for their acts. The men in the navy of the United 
States are exceptionally fine fellows and they rarely give offense to 
those who may be seated in the same restaurant with them. It is 
true that there have been cases where sailors and soldiers have shown 
the effects of drink, but that, too, may be said of the civilian. 
The protection the restaurant man has is in treating each case in- 
dividually and in ejecting any man, be he in uniform or in civilian 
clothes, who comes to his eating house in a drunken condition. To 
attempt to apply a rule excluding the sailor, marine or soldier, be- 
cause his uniform identifies him as such, is an insult to the nation, 
to its navy and its army, and as such should be resented by all 
loyal citizens. 



Last week we made mention of the fact that Mr. 
Going Anyhow Webster Jones, the well known member of the firm 

of Jones-Thierbach Co. was not going to Brazil, 
to attend the Valorisation convention as to coffee and the Brazilian 
National Exposition, on account of the revolutionary conditions ex- 
isting at Rio. Mr. Webster Jones is going to Rio Janeiro and will 
be one of a delegation of two and a secretary to represent the 
United States. His associates in the coffee business and his friends 
in the Commercial Club and the Merchant's Exchange and on Cali- 
fornia street are wishing him bon voyage and a safe return. No 
better man and none who is better posted could have been selected as 
an American representative to Brazil in behalf of the coffee and 
business interests of the country. 



Henry Morgenthau aims to form a fifty mil- 
To Rebuild Austria lion dollar corporation with the avowed purpose 

of rehabilitating Austria. Mr. Morgenthau is a 
very capable man and he has a fine understanding of the Austrian 
people, as well as those of Hungary, and the Balkans in general. It 



would not be a bad idea to place most of the countries, beginning with 
Germany, in the hands of an efficiency commission, composed of 
delegates from all nations, with a view to rehabilitating them. No 
country seems, just now, to need that kind of a commission as 
much as Germany, with Austria running a close second. Russia is 
not mentioned, because Russia will have to do a little redeeming 
on her own account before Russia may be deemed worthy of having 
efficiency experts take her in hand. 



SONGS OF THE STREET 

(O'Farrell and Market streets) 

They have sung of the Songs of the Wildwoods, 

Of the Forests and Prairies and Trees, 

But the song of the Street in the City 

Has a Beauty that's greater than these. 

When the low notes of Traffic grow heavy 

And the rumble swings into a Roar 

When the strident clang of the street car bell 

Comes up through the narrow gore. 

When the factory siren's whistle 

Away on the City's edge. 

The music of hurrying people, 

Comes up to the pinnacle ledge. 

The Buildings tower over the rushing 

As it swirls around at their feet. 

But the sounds that come are beautiful 

For the song of the Street is sweet. 

When you tire of the quiet and country, 

And you long for the bustling din, 

There's a song that's sung in the City 

That is charm to the ears of its kin 

For the Greatest songs ever written 

Or sung by the Voices of Fame 

Can never compare with the melody 

That the Street ever sings in refrain. 

— Charles F. Gallagher. 



— There is more hiking by men and women than ever before 
in the history of the country. And it is a good thing to have some, 
place to hike to, too, isn't it? Marin County seems particularly, on 
account of its mountain scenery and its beaches, to call to the hik- 
ing spirit which lies smoldering within most of us. And we have 
all kinds of hikers. On last Sunday I met an old woman at Stinson 
Beach who told me she was sixty-three years of age. She looked 
about forty-five. She had on the regular riding breeches of the 
hiker and good, sound hob-nailed shoes. A few minutes afterward 
I met an eighteen-year-old miss, who had on riding breeches, too, 
but whose foot-gear was composed of flapper slippers. She had 
walked these through to the skin of her feet and was looking to 
find some sort of store where she could procure insoles. Verily, 
the tribe of damphool is ever with us. 



— "Hunt for the woman" is the trite expression of those who have 
been unable to find a motive for a crime. For that reason the sister- 
in-law of Wilkens has been pounced upon by the police as a prob- 
able cause for the murder of her sister by Wilkens, or by some 
hired by him to do that deed. So far, this young woman comes 
out of the ordeal with a clear, sensible and truth sounding state- 
ment. It begins to look as though the detectives and their friends 
would have to look for some other woman somewhere else. 



— The Irish are still hot-footing it after the Irish. Keep it up, 
boys, and the devil take the hindmost. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER August 12, 1922 



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IS WILKENS GUILTY? That is the question a jury will have 
to decide. Wilkens denies that he is guilty and this denial offers 
a chance for a psychological study of his case. If Walter Castor 
did not kill Mrs. Wilkens and if Wilkens was not his accomplice, 
before and after the act, why did Castor commit wholesale murder 
and why did he flee from the officers? If, as Wilkens says, Castor 
had never any conversation with him since he was in his employ 
years ago, if he had never seen Castor since that time, then why 
did Castor so carefully avoid being brought face to face with those 
who accused him of complicity with Wilkens in the murder of his, 
Wilkens', wife? 

And, right after the crime was committed, we find the Castors 
with money to spend, and to spend in the denomination of the bills 
supposed to have been stolen from Wilkens at the time of the al- 
leged hold-up. Three new one hundred bills. We find the Castors 
running away, hiding themselves, after their first police grilling, as 
to whether they knew anything of this crime or not. We find Wil- 
kens shielding them to the best of his ability by giving wrong in- 
formation as to the kind of car that followed him and jammed him 
against the curb, we find him pretending not to recognize the Cas- 
tors, when drawn up in line at police headquarters, and we find 
Wilkens entrenched in an almost unassailable position, through these 
denials, and because of the disappearance of the Castro brothers. 
Then one of these is caught and he almost immediately confesses 
to complicity. Wilkens denies all this but the search goes on for 
evidence with which to prove that Wilkens conspired to have his 
wife killed. 

There are odd and irreconcilable facts connected with Wilkens 
and his relationship to his wife. Those who were with the couple 
and their children on the vacation preceding the killing of the wife 
are agreed that not a more loving couple ever had a play time to- 
gether and that Wilkens' conduct was irreproachable. At the same 
time there is the statement that, some time ago, Mrs. Wilkens was 
ready to file papers to obtain a divorce, or a separation, from her 
husband. In this instrument, it is said, the wife alleged Wilkens 
had relations with other women. Who were the other women, or 
who is THE woman? So far none has intruded in the affair, as 
far as the public knows from what little evidence against Wilkens 
has been published. 

And an attempt is now being made to show that Wilkens him- 
self killed his wife. Did he? That remains a question. If he did 
kill his wife there was no reason for the stand Castor took as to 
the police and no good reason why Castor should so strongly fear 
arrest. 

And right in the fear inspired by Castor in others is found a par- 
tial solution of much that is mysterious in this case. Taking it for 
granted Wilkens was really an accomplice we can account for the 
desire not to identify the Castor brothers with the crime in the fear 
in which he held Walter. We can lay his stubborn adherence to the 
statement made originally as to the kind of car the hold-up men 
rode in to this fear. The whole Castor family was full of fear. Fear 
of this and fear of that. They had been terrorized for years by 
the son, Walter. The daughter-in-law was living in alliance with 
her brother-in-law. 

It may be said that this case was not nearly as well handled by 
the police, and especially by the detectives, as it might have been. 
If the Castors had been held when they were first detained on sus- 
picion, and a proper investigation had then been made the proba- 
bility is the case would have been cleared by this time and Mrs. 
Wilkens might have been the only victim. For reasons, which have 



not yet been probed to a clear understanding, the Castors were re- 
leased and there does not seem after that to have been a very great 
co-operation shown by those working on the case, to say the least. 

Now, that Walter Castor is dead, it seems many persons are quite 
willing to testify he was always wrong in the head, had been kicked 
by a horse. If that is a fact and these persons, those closest to him, 
his brothers and his mother, knew this to be a fact and they were 
living in a constant fear that something dreadfully tragic was im- 
pending, why did they not take the proper steps under the law to 
have him placed somewhere in restraint that this horrible tragedy 
might not happen? No, they did not do this thing, which was ob- 
viously the thing to do, but they clung together in shielding him 
from harm, from being taken in hand by the authorities and placed 
in an asylum. And even now that he is dead by his own hand, is 
accused of having killed Mrs. Wilkens, is shown to have killed two 
other human beings, and of having attempted to murder another, 
these same relatives and others rush to his defense because he 
"washed the kitchen floor for his mother and was always ready to 
clean the dishes." We have maudlin individuals who are full of 
charity for him in his misdeeds, the same kind of persons who would 
turn a hard face to a misguided individual who might slip ever so 
slightly from the straight path and against whom no charge was 
ever made and whose reputation otherwise was unblemished. 

Here is an individual who, by the confession of his mother and 
other apologists, was always looking for trouble, who was wrong- 
headed about things and always inclined to be violent, who, ap- 
parently, was the seducer of his brother's wife as well as her mur- 
derer, who is accused of the murder of Mrs. Wilkens, and who wan- 
tonly killed and wounded officers of the law, who very readily finds 
those in the community who would blame everything but himself 
for the awful things he has done. It is certainly a very queer world 
with a lot of very queer people in it. 

The history of the case, as we piece it together, goes to show that 
once his temper unleashed, Walter Castor was a fiend thirsting for 
blood. That gives one of the best reasons for believing that he 
killed Mrs. Wilkens. 

Wilkens denies having anything at all to do with the killing of 
his wife. His frantic appeals to those who were driving the auto- 
mobile, after the woman was shot, to hurry to the hospital because 
she might die before they got there, is something in his favor. His 
little son's testimony is another strong refutation of the charge 
against him. And yet, there are a number of circumstances, and 
the evidence of one of the Castors, that Wilkens not only knew Wal- 
ter Castor, but was quite familiar with him. Since the murders and 
suicide there steps forward a nurse who says that Wilkens killed his 
wife. She will undoubtedly be a witness. Was it necessary that 
Castor should put himself out of the way before this woman might 
step out and testify to clear him of the act of killing? Was it fear 
kept her from the police with the knowledge of this case? And what 
of the Castor brothers, especially of Robert, the man whose wife 
Walter had taken, what of him? Why didn't he come forward and 
rid the family and the community of this potential murderer before 
additional murdering was done? 

Wilkens is said to have plotted the killing of his wife. He is 
credited with having told Castor he would get $5000 for the deed. 
He is credited with having paid Castor $450. If Castor did not 
kill the woman why did he complain that he had only received 
$450 out of his promised thousands. And, after all, what was the 
urgent motive behind this death in Wilkens' mind? What was the 
motive and where is the other woman, if such exists? 



August 12, 1922 AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 7 

gqMM>««M«>nMMHIHIHr MH I MMMM^ ^ 




Poisnte for Property Owimers 



iHSHiaaBiiaBiHHigiiaiiBiiiiBiiiHaaHBisHiaBKMiaHi 



THE PROPERTY owner is the greatest factor in a community's 
welfare. Probably he does not know this to be a fact, but it 
is nevertheless true. He stands for solidity and safety and it is on 
his or her shoulders communities are built and made to last. 

If every man or woman, of rather more than adolescent age, 
could earn a piece of land and a home upon it, although it might 
not be more than a shack, that man or woman would add to the 
standing and the lasting qualities of the community. 

It is ownership of land, ownership of stocks in corporations, which 
has given France its capacity to withstand the onslaughts of the reds. 
It is that which has given the French men and women their abiding 
faith in the institutions of their country. The French are property 
owners. If it is not land and a home they own they are owners of 
stocks in industrial activities or in co-operative farms or in a thou- 
sand and one dividend paying concerns. That kind of people can- 
not revolute. If they did they would destroy the value of their 
shares in corporations. 

What is needed in this country is a multiplicity of land owners 
and a multipilicity of holders of stocks and bonds in our many cor- 
porations. 

With every year passing we are driving the landed proprietors, 
who own large estates, to cut these up and sell them in smaller par- 
cels and in every way we are making it easier for men and women 
to own their own homes or their farms. 

The ownership of very large pieces of land may easily become 
a menace to the advancement of the country and it is better that 
there should be a dozen owners of a parcel than one. Of course, 
that subject has already been touched upon in these articles, but it 
does no harm to mention it again. 

The property owners are a class of people who do not, as yet, 
possess the proper class consciousness. Class consciousness is so lit- 
tle developed among them it is only in isolated instances that they 
have had the sense to stand together against harmful legislation or 
for beneficial improvements. 

It would be far better for the city, and for themselves, if the prop- 
erty owners were to form themselves into associations, which would 
be inter-related, each association devoted to some particular dis- 
trict and delegates from all of these coming together for delibera- 
tion at least once a month. 

Such an association would promote a better government for the 
city and would certainly ensure a more just system of taxation and 
would eliminate a lot of lost motion and graft. Such an associa- 
tion would certainly be a great power for good, not only as to what 
might affect the city at large, but as to what would affect the 
owners of property and in its effects would tend to broaden the 
minds of those owning property, thus brought together in a com- 
mon cause. 

Many very foolish ideas now finding lodgment with property owners 
would be brushed aside and many new and valuable ideas to give 
property a greater real value would almost immediately be brought 
forward. Parts of the city in which property has lost its value 
could be made to assume a different character almost over night, and 
a co-operative action could always be taken to combat any evil 
threatening the property owner or the value of his property. 

The city and county of San Francisco should be divided into dis- 
tricts and each district should have its Co-operative Association of 
Property Owners. Each association should have its delegate or 
delegates to the monthly convention of the Associations of Property 
Owners. The property owner would not only then be a factor in the 



welfare of the community, but through these associations property 
would have something to say in regard to city government and that 
something would HAVE to be listened to and heeded. 

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Fred Solari — Cahens Grill 

1 9 Union Square Ave. 

Off Kearny Street, Opposite Chronicle Bldg. 

Enlarged and refurnished, with perfect ventilation 
system. Private booths on mezzanine floor, quality 
food and service, personal attention. Large parking 
space. 

Phone Sutter 8613 
Open Till 10 P. M. 

Fred Solari— Cahen's Grill 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 12, 1922 



3SXXXJOSXX*XXViiNV*X>a3S3a{XS£XXX^ 



©m Heaird It? 



Being a foreigner, Sam Cohan found it a task to write signs 
for the windows of his department store. At last he hit upon an 
idea, and instead of writing the amount of an article in dollars, he 
simply put down a dot. For instance, one dot (.) meant one dollar; 
two dots, two dollars, etc. 

One day he left his son, Abie, to take care of the store while he 
went to unch. When he returned he noticed a pair of trousers 
had been sold from the window which had been marked four dol- 
lars. He immediately went to the cash register, and to his surprise 
found that twelve dollars had been put in. 

"Abie," he called excitedly, "what else did you sell?" 

"Nuttin'," replied the worthy son. 

"But my son, Abie," replied the father, "the pants dey were 
marked four dollars, here is twelve." 

"No, father, they were marked twelve dots." 

Sam Cohen rubbed his hands for several seconds, and then his 
face brightened, and, folding his hands, he cried: 

"God bless de flies!" 

A widow in the Fish Lake valley, Nev., country several years 
ago hired a Piute Indian to work in the harvest. The second night 
at supper the widow, who did her own cooking, served a sort of 
pancake, as she had at the evening meal the day before. As she 
was passing around the plate of rather heavy discs, she noticed 
that the Piute was trimming off the arcs from his cakes before 
he gulped them down, and had a pile of the quarter-circle frag- 
ments about his plate several inches high. 

"Hey, there, Charlie!" she demanded angrily, "what's the big 
idea, anyway. Flour'n eggs cost too much in this country to waste 
like that!" 

Charlie looked up. "Well," he said, his burdened fork hoisted 
half way, "last night me eatum mebbyso twenty, t'irty pancake — 
he rollum 'round and 'round all night all same wheels in clock — 
me no ketchum much sleep. Tonight me fixum — me makum all 
square — she no rollum 'round tonight." 

Senator Hiram Johnson was praising, at a dinner in Washington, 
the beauties of his native state. 

"And our fish!" he exclaimed. "If you could see our jeweled 
fish swimming in the pellucid California water among the pink, 
the green and the cream-colored corals. Why, we actually have in 
California fish that blush." 

Senator Johnson smiled. 

"Of course, it's no wonder they blush," he added, "considering 
the abbreviated bathing suits that some of our California girls wear." 
— Los Angeles Times. 

A canny Scot and his wife visited an aviation field and wished 
to take a ride in an airplane, but the aviator's charges seemed pre- 
posterous to the Scotchman. After much bickering the aviator, with 
a wink, agreed to take MacTavish and Maggie up for $5 if they 
didn't utter a word during the flight; but if they did, it would cost 
him $50. 

The Scotchman agreed, and they started off. As soon as they 
got in the air the aviator dipped, looped the loop, and did every 
kind of a dare-devil stunt he could think of, but nary a word out 
of the Scot. 

Finally, when they touched the ground, the Scotchman said: "Kin 
I speak now?" 

The aviator yelled, "Sure." 
MacTavish yelled back, "Well, Maggie's oot!" 



The Bakersfield 

Sleeper on 

"OWL" 

Leaving San Francisco (Ferry Station) 
6 p. m. Daily 

Provides most convenient service. It 
is cut out at Bakersfield during the night 
and passengers can remain in their 
berths until breakfast time. 

On return trip to San Francisco Sleeper 
can be occupied any time after 9 p. m. 

Dinner in Dining Car on going trip and 
Breakfast returning. 

Make your sleeping car reservations early 

Southern Pacific Lines 

50 Post St Ferry Station Third St. Station 

of Phone Sutter 4000 




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t * 

Casa Del Rey | 



SANTA CRUZ 



CALIFORNIA + 



The ^Million 'Dollar Fireproof Hotel 



THE ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm 
beach bathing; dancing; good music; artistic, home-like 
spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful 
playgrounds; sanitary warm bathing pool; swimming 
instructors; saddle ponies for children. Special kitchen- 
ette in hotel proper where maid can prepare food for 
young children. 

Complete highways, through the most beautiful sec- 
tion of California. (Only 80 miles.) The Southern Pa- 
cific offers unusually low rates from all California points; 
the warmest and most accessible beach out of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also 
under the same management as Casa Del Rey. 

Correspondence about rates for families with maids 
and children solicited. Special rates by the week or for 
extended stays of a month or two. Address: 



* 

$ CASA DEL REY : 

* MORRIS & W.1BNER, Proprietors 



SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 

Phone 600 



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' t* ' l" I "t"t"I"t"t"t" t "t ' » **»< " t " l'»»4 " t "H" t'»»*****»»»»»'> " t"t " t " l'*»'i' 



August 12, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




HER 

— The big noise is not nearly as much noise as I imagined it was 
going to be. I was present at a cinema the other day when some 
very good pictures of Senator Johnson and his two boys were shown 
by the Fox films. I expected that there would be some hand-clap- 
ping and enthusiasm shown, but there wasn't enough of that kind 
of business to make it worth while. And they were good pictures, 
too. I noticed another thing, as well. When Hiram was speaking 
at the Ferry depot the crowd which greeted him was barely large 
enough to fill the front of the film. What is the matter with Hiram's 
boom? He certainly was, in times past, one of the strongest crowd 
and cheer builders we have ever known. Has he lost his magnetism 
and are the people tired of the noise? Judging by the way these 
film pictures are being received, and by the films themselves, Hiram 
is slipping fast. 

— Isn't it about time the Chamber of Commerce got out of the 
newspaper business? If it is a commendable act to have the Cham- 
ber enter into a lively competition with legitimate publishers, who 
have a hard enough job making a living anyway, why does not 
the Chamber open up dry goods stores, paint selling shops, house- 
hold hardware establishments, hair cutting parlors, bird, cat and 
dog shops; soft drink boozeries; shoe shops, and a host of other 
enterprises? If the Chamber is to be a sort of soviet institution 
on a small scale why not enlarge the scale and treat 'em all alike? 
Why should the Chamber aim to hurt one class of business only? 
Why not hurt all in every line and be consistent about it? 

— The supervisors are coming to the decision to establish a water- 
front bus line. There is not any doubt at all that a line of some 
kind should be operated along the waterfront, but a bus is scarcely 
the right thing. Unless the supervisors will have the front paved with 
asphalt in its entire length, it is scarcely wise to attempt to run a 
bus over the various samples of paving now existing. It is claimed 
such a line will not pay but it is pointed out that a loop line would 
pay, if run from the foot of Hyde street to connect at the other end 
with the Third and Townsend street terminal of the United Railways 
and with transfer privileges at both ends. And that is another rea- 
son why the municipal line should own the entire street car system of 
San Francisco or get out of the business and let the Market Street 
Railway do the job and do it right. 

— I am told the rotunda, if it may be called, of the Ferry build- 
ing is at last to be made use of by the California Development 
Board and that the exhibits of the board will be strung along in 
the big space. In my opinion the California Development Board 
will only make a partial use of the space and the rest of it should 
be fitted up so as to be rentable to merchants of every line. Make 
use of the depot, just as the Grand Central and the Pennsylvania 
roads' depots are made use of in New York. Depots are ideal 
places for stores and there is not any good reason why the Ferry 
depot at San Francisco should not be turned into a large attractive 

mart. 

* * * 

— If personal appearance and style of speech goes to show what 
kind of an individual you are, then the Japanese delegation to the 
Brazilian exposition, who passed through San Francisco this week, 
is most exceptionally edifying as to the Japanese people whom they 
represent. A better impression was never left anywhere than this 
delegation left in San Francisco as being composed of courteous, 
educated, cultured gentlemen. 




(aswe 

1^— ^ NATIONAL CREST 

(Me 

.800.000 cup* were serve 
at the. PANAMA- PACIFI 
International EXPOSITIO] 



Telephones 
Softer 6654 — Oakland 1017 



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day for your future 

if you live — for your family's future if 
you don't? This deposit GUARANTEES 
$5000 whether you live or die. At age 35 
deposit required only 24 years, according 
to our present dividend schedule. 



ARTHUR J. HILL 

California Manager. State Life of Indiana, 
1001 Monadnook Bldg., San Francisco 



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If you can save 50c a day. All in and 
mail this blank to Mr. Hill. No obli- 
gation is entailed. 

I Name 

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| Address 

, Age nearest birthday 



.J 



10 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 12, 1922 




Thirtv-Tw© Thousamidl Iirwestoir, 



'Of 



^^^^^^^^^^^e^^S^S.sS.~&^&a^WS^M^^^S^^^^^^^^M^S^SSSxSM'~.~ S 's ~ » >• RUSH! 




TO BE ABLE to look backward in the history of a public service 
corporation and to derive from the retrospect just as much if 
not more satisfaction than in looking forward, is a very unusual 
gratification to those owning stock in the corporation. When it is 
remembered that from a very small beginning has grown one of the 
largest and most beneficent and effective services the world has 
ever known the pleasure is very materially increased. 

That is the case with those who have aided by their investments 
and their belief in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company to build 
up this great organization. This California corporation has thirty- 
two thousand stockholders in California. It is a utility that has 
been managed and built up by Californians and with California 
money. 

The company is offering its First Preferred stock — to yield 6.86 
per cent on the investment. The factors of safety are found in the 
fact that the company supplies every day necessities, its business is 
therefore stable and it has increased with every year of the com- 
pany's existence. It has made a gain in subscribers in fifteen years 
of nearly half a million subscribers. Its gain in gross business, cov- 
ering the same period, was $26,167,566, and this means an average 
yearly gain of $1,744,504. The field is an exceptional one and is 
found in the fact that California is one of the wealthiest and the 
most rapidly growing of the forty-nine States. In its business field 
the company serves just about one-half of the population and this 
means 610,067 consumers. It has behind it sixty-eight years of 
experience and its corps of 8000 employes are trained to the min- 
ute and many of these have become stockholders. 

The surplus earnings, upon which Preferred Stock Dividends have 
first call, are based upon sound property values and have never been 
less than double dividend requirements. 

It is most interesting to know that the earnings have never de- 
creased annually and that the twelve months ending with the last 
day of May showed earnings as follows : Surplus available for divi- 
dends, $5,372,213; Preferred Stock dividends, $2,375,586, while 
the balance was $2,996,627. The dividends on Preferred Stock have 
been paid continuously for thirteen years. 

The proceeds of the present issue of stock will be expended in 
income producing additions and extensions. This includes very 
large hydro-electric developments, recently completed and now under 
way, aggregating 137,000 H. P. In the last five years the com- 
pany has invested more than fifty millions of dollars of new capi- 
tal in additional properties made necessary to meet the growth of 
the demand on its business. 

The most important considerations to those who desire to place 
their money where it will bring back the largest possible return, with 
safety as to the investment, are the factors we have just named and 
additionally the special advantages the issue of such a stock offers. 
This is the day of investments in all kinds of stocks and bonds 
carrying the elements of safety and combining with these special ad- 
vantages appealing to the business sense of the investor. 

Consider that this stock is non-assessable and non-callable. It is 
free from all State, county or municipal taxes in California, and 
it assures a continuance of liberal returns. The dividends are paid 
at convenient intervals, there is an established market for the stock 
in New York, Chicago, San Francisco and other centers. 

It is an exceptionally fine medium for the investment of private 
and business reserve funds and we cannot bear too strongly on this 
particular advantage over many other forms of investment which 
may be offered. 



No enterprise is so full of potentially beneficent advantages to 
the State of California as the Pacific Gas and Electric Company in 
its present and future development and no single enterprise means 
so much to the people of the State. Every step forward made by 
this corporation is a step forward in the development of the indus- 
tries of the whole State, because power development is the founda- 
tion upon which the manufacturing enterprises of the State must 
depend. The development of power means the development of the 
transit companies of the State and the expansion of every business 
using electricity. It is almost impossible to look into any kind of 
business activity "Pacific Service" does not enter into as one of 
the largest factors in creating a success. 



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Davis and Sacramento Sts. 

Beware of Imitations. Ask your grocer. Insist 
upon the Original Modesto Creamery Brand 



August 12, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



11 



A MILLION FARMERS FOR A MILLION 
FARMS 

That is the slogan adopted by the people 
who have the handling of the one hundred 
and fifty million dollar propaganda fund for 
Australia. They point to the fact that here 
are thousands of acres of arable land, thou- 
sands of acres of timber, mineral land in 
plenty, Austrialia occupies a very peculiar 
position in the ecomonic development of the 
world. It is a country of anomalous condi- 
tions and of strange prejudices. It is a colony 
of old England, a wonderful commonwealth, 
teeming with the hidden and exposed and 
potential wealth of the world. It is a coun- 
try which has worked itself so far in its des- 
tiny that it has developed an individuality all 
its own and a distinctive nationality. It has 
eight hundred million acres of vacant land. 
Unoccupied and rich as any of the territory 
of these United States. It has given to the 
world many statesmen, many eminent men 
in all walks and callings and many notable 
women. It wants to increase its citizenship 
to a large extent and it is willing to spend 
money to bring this increase about. Australia 
knows the value of printer's ink and is go- 
ing to sling it about on the dead walls of 
the world, in the public prints and in every 
way to attract notice to itself. The News 
Letter salutes the Commonwealth and wishes 
it success. 



A DESERVED HONOR 

Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove has been elected vice 
president of the National Hair Dressers As- 
sociation at the St. Louis convention of 
that body. The convention adopted three 
styles of women's coiffure and has estab- 
lished a National Beauty Week. The slogan 
adopted for this event is "Look Your Best." 
This is the day of looking your best and 
when Mrs. Cosgrove arrives home she will 
be able to tell the many patrons of Cos- 
grove's Hair Store how to look their best. 
Mr. J. and Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove have been 
in attendance at the national convention of 
the association. 



Natural History Teacher: Jimmy, where 
does the swallow go when it goes south? 
Jimmy: To the stummick. 



Cafe Marquard 

GEARY AND MASON STREETS 
Telephone Prospect 61 

Visitors In San Francisco Delight In the 
Gay Bohemian Atmosphere, the Enter- 
tainment and Danclnit. the Rare Quality 
of Food and Courteous Service 



I.VNCIIEON 

Continental Style 

Twenty-Six Delicious Pishes. Prepared 

and Served So Differently 



DINNER 

Every Evening — Six to Nine 
Select B la Carte 



Dancing and Cabaret 



Sunbeams 

"Old Alf is bringing an action against the 
company. The dinner bell went just as 'e wos 
liftin' a 'eavy piece of iron, an' 'e let it fall 
on his foot." 



Banker: How much liquid assets have 
you? 

Customer (cautiously) : About a case and 
a half. — Manufacturers' Trust Quarterly Bul- 
letin. 



Ted: Have you selected the things you're 
going to take on your motor camping trip? 

Ned: Yes, and now I have to pick out the 
ones I must leave behind. 



Papa: Why did you permit young Gay- 
bird to kiss you in the parlor last night? 

Daughter: Because I was afraid he'd catch 
cold in the hall. — Boston Globe. 



Chambermaid: Would you like me to put 
a bottle in your bed, sir? 

Mcintosh: Aye, I would that! Johnny 
Walker for preference! — The Passing Show 
(London). 



"She is false to our club, that girl." 

"What now?" 

"Here we are selling kisses to raise money, 
and she's bootlegging 'em free in the con- 
servatory." 



"In time of trial," said the preacher, "what 
brings us the greatest comfort?" 

"An acquittal," responded a person who 
should never have been admitted. — Stan- 
ford Chaparral. 



Jazz: My girl told me she weighed 120 the 
other night. 

Beau: Stripped? 

Jazz: Yeh; she was in an evening gown. 
— Ohio Sun Dial. 



Interviewer: What sort of girls make the 
best show girls? 

Stage Manager: Those who have the most 
to show, of course! — Dartmouth Jack O'Lan- 
tern. 



"Papa, what is common stock?" 

"Home-brew." 

"Well, then, what's preferred stock?" 

"The other man's." 



Father (reading a letter from his son at 
college to mother) : Myopia says he's got a 
beautiful lamp from boxing. 

Mother: I just knew he'd win something in 
his athletics. — Oregon Ag. Orange Bowl. 



A physician has discovered that married 
people all look alike. But they never wear ex- 
actly similar expressions when an unexpected 
motor party arrives just before dinner. — Life. 



Ho: Look at the goat chewing on that 
dress. 

Hum : Yes, it must be a dinner gown. 



YOUR APPETITE WAITS 

Many a person has an appetite which lit- 
erally waits on the surroundings and such 
persons may not partake of a menu where 
the process of satisfying hunger must be at- 
tended with noise and unpleasant surround- 
ings. That is why the Fairmont luncheon is 
such a popular thing with the business man. 
The surroundings are such and the lunch- 
eon is so appetizing that the business man 
finds it a recuperative stimulus for rest of 
the business day. The Fairmont is only five 
minutes' ride from the busiest centers. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Pays You 
$500 a 
Month 
for Life 



IF YOU ARE A MID- 
DLE AGED BUSINESS 
MAN EARNING AS 
M UCH AS $8,000 A 
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PHYSICAL CONDI- 
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old with assets over 58 million 
dollars. 

It interested, fill out and send at- 
tached coupon 

Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company 
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Name 

Age 

Address 

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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 12, 1922 




ociet 




Busy Cupid 

THE marriage of Miss Emily Crowe, 
daughter of Mrs. Madeline Crowe, and 
Mr. Kent Weaver, son of Mr. Lloyd Weaver 
of this city, was solemnized at 4:30 o'clock 
Tuesday afternoon at the Crowe home in 
Oakland. Dr. William K. Guthrie officiated 
in the presence of the two families. Mr. and 
Mrs. Weaver will go to the Hawaiian Is- 
lands on their honeymoon and on their re- 
turn they will make their home in Piedmont. 

— Announcement is made of the marriage 
of Dr. Perie Penfield of this city to George 
S. Newell of San Antonio, Texas. The cere- 
mony took place at the home of the bride's 
brother, Frank Penfield, at Houston, Texas, 
August 3. The bride, who has been asso- 
ciated with Dr. Adelaide Brown in the prac- 
tice of medicine, has a host of friends here 
to whom the news will be a surprise. The 
newlyweds will make their home in San An- 
tonio. 

— Mrs. Mansfield Lovell announces the en- 
gagement of her daughter. Miss Minerva 
Lovell, to Angus Gordon Nicolson of Bridge- 
port, Conn. The Lovells are one of the 
prominent pioneer families of this city. Miss 
Lovell being a granddaughter of the late 
Charles H. Hathaway, one of this state's 
early capitalists. Young Mr. Nicolson comes 
of an old Scotch family, many relatives be- 
ing in the service of the British government, 
in the army and navy, and otherwise. It 
was while the Lovells were in Honolulu on 
a visit that the engaged couple met last year. 
Mr. Nicolson is visiting in San Francisco. 

—Mr. and Mrs. L. Holden Parker of Ra- 
cine, Wis., have announced the engagement 
of their daughter. Miss Elinor Dudley Par- 
ker, to Major Ward Stanley Wells, medical 
corps, U. S. A. Miss Parker has passed much 
of her time in California. She is a niece 
of Mrs. E. A. Heron of Oakland and of Mrs. 




Under the guidance of R. H. Collins 
and his associates, the Peerless was 
bound to be a better and better Peer- 
less. The public response came quick- 
ly and is indicated by augmented sales 
in old Peerless strongholds and 
throughout the country in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St 

Telephone Prospect 8800 



Wallace I. Terry of this city. Major Wells, 
who is at present stationed at the Letterman 
General Hospital, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
E. J. Wells of Nashua, Iowa. The marriage 
will take place in San Francisco this fall, 
probably at the Wallace I. Terry home, 
where Miss Parker is passing the summer 
months. 

Luncheons 

— Miss Priscilla Leonard, who is visiting 
from Pawtucket, R. I., was the guest of 
honor at a luncheon at which Mrs. Edward 
Rice was hostess Tuesday afternoon. The 
party was held at the Rice home in Belve- 
dere where Miss Leonard will pass the month 
of August. 

— Mrs. Elmer Cox, recently home from 
abroad, entertained for her visiting friend, 
Mrs. Conrad Peters of Paris, France, at 
luncheon at the Hotel St. Francis Monday. 

— Mrs. Ord Preston and her two daugh- 
ters, the Misses Mary and Eleanor Preston, 
are here from Washington, D. C. Miss Anne 
Peters entertained for them at an informal 
luncheon at the Hotel St. Francis Monday. 

— Mrs. C. A. Severance, wife of the presi- 
dent of the American Bar Association, was 
honored at a delightful luncheon party in the 
fable room of the Hotel St. Francis Mon- 
day given by Mrs. W. H. H. Piatt of Kan- 
sas City. 

— Mrs. Daniel Murphy gave a luncheon 
last week in Burlingame when she had as 
her guests Mrs. Arthur Page-Brown, Mrs. 
Thomas Eastland, Mrs. Lawrence Mc- 
Creery, Mrs. William Parrott, Miss Bernard 
Ford, Mrs. Eugene Murphy, Mrs. Edward 
McCauley, Miss Helen Crocker and Miss 
Josephine Grant. 

— Miss Blanche Burbank was hostess at 
a delightful bridge luncheon on Tuesday 
at the Hotel Plaza. 

— Mrs. R. P. Schwerin and Mrs. Lawrence 
McCreery were together for luncheon on 
Monday at the Hotel St. Francis. 

— A delightful luncheon party in the gar- 
den of the Hotel St. Francis on Monday in- 
cluded Miss Jennie Blair, Miss Celia O'Con- 
nor and Mrs. Ritchie L. Dunn. 

— Mrs. George Warren, notable among 
the women writers of Honolulu, was the 
guest of honor at a luncheon party given by 
Mrs. D. M. Linnard Tuesday at the Fairmont 
Hotel. 

Teas 

—Mrs. Sydney Ford and Mrs. L. Spencer 
Davis shared the honors at the tea which 
Mrs. Robert J. Davis and Mrs. Arthur W. 
Ford gave at the Davis home in Ross Wed- 
nesday afternoon. 

— Mrs. Gerald Campbell, wife of the newly 
appointed British consul to San Francisco, 
was the guest of honor at a tea which Mrs. 
Margaret Bruce Beaumont entertained Tues- 
day afternoon in the Palace Hotel. Forty- 



five guests were bidden to the delightful 
affair. 

— Miss Kiltie Fletcher gave a tea and 
bridge party Tuesday afternoon for Miss 
Hope Somerset, whose engagement to Don- 
ald Walsh has been announced. 

— Mrs. Frank Ogden gave a very de- 
lightful tea at the Palace Hotel Saturday 
in honor of Miss Emily Crowe, whose mar- 
riage to Kent Weaver occurred on Tuesday. 

— Mrs. Bertha Stringer Lee, one of the 
notable women painters of California, gave 
a most enjoyable tea at her home on Thurs- 
day afternoon. The particular idea of in- 
terest was an exhibition of paintings, all 
California scenes, which brought a vivid 
reminder of the seasonal beauty of the hills 
into the rooms. 

— An event of the week which is being 
anticipated by society is the Mah Jongg tea 
to be given at the Fairmont Saturday for 
which almost 100 tables have been engaged. 
Miss Marceline d'Alroy has been appointed 
art director of the World's Art Salon under 
whose auspices the tea will be given and 
she is in charge of the pageant of fashion, 
part of the afternoon's entertainment. San 
Francisco was the first city in the United 
States to introduce the game of Mah Jongg 
and it has achieved an immediate success, 
teas, at which the game is played, being 
given often, both in San Francisco and down 
the peninsula. 

Dinners 

— Dudley Gunn was host at a delightful 
dinner party at the Hotel Rafael on Satur- 
day evening, entertaining as his guests a 
group of the young people who are summer- 
ing in Marin. Mr. and Mrs. Ralston White 
chaperoned the party. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Denman were 
hosts at a dinner party Monday night in 
honor of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Severance . 

— Mrs. Lawson Adams was hostess at a 
dinner party for sixteen of her friends on 
Sunday night at her home in Belvedere. 
The affair was in compliment to Dr. Albert 
Abrams. 

Dances 

— Miss Geraldine Graham has issued in- 
vitations to a fancy dress ball which she will 
give at the Montecito Country Club this Sat- 
urday evening. 



ADAMS GOLF CO. 

Specializing 

in 

Golf Instruction 

EXPERT INSTRUCTOR AND CLUB 
MAKER IN ATTENDANCE 



DEPENDABLE SERVICE 



54 Kearny Phone Douglas 7838 



August 12, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS - WEEKLY 



13 



Receptions 

— A large reception was given this week 
at the Fairmont Hotel in honor of Chief 
Justice William Howard Taft, former am- 
bassador to Great Britain, John William 
Davis and former Attorney General Wick- 
ersham. Mrs. Louise F. Monteagle, with 
a score of assisting hostesses, and Dr. 
Charles Mills Gayley were head of the re- 
ception committee. The affair was given 
by the California branch of the English- 
speaking union. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bothin extended the 
hospitality of their home in Ross Saturday 
afternoon for the ninth annual celebration 
of the Sir Francis Drake Association. 
In Town and Out 

— Mr. Willis Walker motored from his 
country place at Pebble Beach to Santa 
Barbara Saturday and he is enjoying a va- 
cation of several days at El Mirasol. 

— Miss Mary Grace Hayne has gone to 
Santa Barbara to pass the month of August 
with her father, Mr. Robin Hayne. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hayne have recently returned to the 
southern city from a several weeks' vaca- 
tion at Zaca Lake . 

— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. Redington of 
San Mateo and their daughters, the Misses 
Margaret and Mary Redington, arrived Fri- 
day last at Ye Castle Inn near Santa Barbara 
to remain throughout the month of August. 

— Horace D. Pillsbury, who has been visit- 
ing friends at Mount Diablo, has returned 
to town. Mrs. Pillsbury, who is abroad with 
her son and small daughter, will return home 
next month. 

— Mrs. Milton Pray and her little cousin, 
Genevieve Hart, have returned from a visit 
to Del Monte, Monterey and Carmel and are 
at the Pray home, 1272 Cabrillo avenue, 
Burlingame. Mrs. Pray owns property at 
Pebble Beach and will build a home there 
in the near future. 

— Mrs. Arnold Gilmore and Mrs. Fred- 
erick Van Sicklen have returned to their 
homes here after having taken a motor trip 
through the South. They were away several 
weeks. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Athol McBean and Master 
Peter McBean have gone to Lake Tahoe for 
a stay of several weeks. They are guests at 
Tahoe Tavern. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Wade Ellis, who arrived 
last week from Washington, D. C, to spend 
a holiday in California, returned Tuesday 
from Burlingame, where they passed the 
week end with Mr. and Mrs. George T. 
Marye. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Horace Hill and their 
little daughters. Miss Cynthia and Miss 
Peggy Hill, have gone to Lake Tahoe 
for a five weeks' stay and they are occupy- 
ing the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Gallois 
on the lake shores. Mr. and Mrs. Gallois 
have again postponed their return to San 
Francisco, and in spite of the intolerable 



LEARN COSTUME DESIGN— 

Fashion Illustration — Pattern Drafting. 

Millinery Making ami Designing 

Visit Exhibition of Students' Work 

ClassM Daj i*ml Evening 

ne Prospect 67S 

FASHION ACADEMY, Inc. 

Srolll-li Kile Temple 



1290 Salter St. 



heat, they are enjoying the summer in New 
York. 

— Mrs. Stuart Mackay (Vida Dodge) is 
here from New York visiting her mother, 
who makes her home at the Fairmont Hotel. 
She will return East within a fortnight. This 
is the first visit here of the young matron 
since her marriage about two years ago. 

— Baron and Baroness J. C. Van Eck, with 
their children, who have been summering at 
Santa Barbara, have returned to their home 
in town. 

— The golf links continue to be the center 
of attraction at Feather River Inn. Fishing 
in all the lakes is at its best, as well as in 
the Feather river. Fishing parties start out 
early each day, returning in time for dinner 
with the limit — 25. The largest catch of 
the season was made by Mrs. Max Kuril 
and Mrs. George Bell recently. Mr. Kuhl 
is also an enthusiastic fisherman, as is Dr. 
Levin, who has caught the limit several days 
this week. 

Intimations 

— Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Griffin and 
their children, Miss Constance and Master 
Frank W. Griffin Jr., have taken possession 
of their new home in Union street, which 
was formerly occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Jo- 
seph Kellogg Hutchinson. For the past year 
the Griffins have resided in an attractive 
residence in Vallejo street, which was pur- 
chased some months ago by Mrs. Edward 
Pringle Sr., who will take possession of it 
in October. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Van Dyke Johns will 
make their permanent home in the North, 
probably in Seattle. Since their return from 
the Hawaiian Islands, where they were mar- 
ried in the spring, they have been in the 
Northwest, and have been dividing their time 
between Seattle and Spokane. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Harold Ward Law, who 
went abroad in the early part of the sum- 
mer, are now at Venice. They plan to leave 
Europe next month for San Francisco. 

— Mrs. Harry H. Scott, who with her 
daughter, Nancy, has been in Santa Bar- 
bara, returned home Tuesday. Mrs. Scott's 
mother, Mrs. Edgar Preston, accompanied 
by Miss Frances Ames and Miss Josephine 
Drown, who are now in England, will come 
home next month after being abroad a year 
or so. The girls have been attending a fin- 
ishing school. 

—Mr. and Mrs. James G. Blaine Jr. (Beryl 
Whitney), who have passed the last four 
months in Burlingame, will return to San 
Francisco for the winter. 

— Friends of Mrs. Horace Blanchard Chase 
will be glad to know that, although she is 
still confined to her home, she has almost 
recovered from her recent illness. 

— Lieutenant Commander and Mrs. F. G. 
Reinicke are being congratulated on the 
birth of a daughter on July 5 at Long Beach. 
The young mother, who is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. John R. Chadwick of Long 
Island. N. Y.. is a relative of Miss Mary 
Louise Phelan of San Francisco and of for- 
mer Senator James D. Phelan. 

— Mrs. Peter Martin and her son, Charles 
Oelrichs Martin, have taken an apartment 
in Rome. 



FASHION ACADEMY 

The students of Fashion Academy, a 
school of costume design at Scottish Rite 
temple, will give a fashion show at the Mah 
Jongg entertainment given by the Worlds 
Art Salon at the Fairmont Hotel on Satur- 
day, August 12. 

The costumes worn by the students are 
to be very bizarre and artistic in every way. 
The dresses are made entirely of crepe paper. 
Combs made of sealing wax, earrings of 
decorated clay, shoes tinted and colored to 
match costumes will be worn. The costumes 
are complete and striking, and every one is 
dfferent and reveals an individual type. 

The artistic ability of the students of Fash- 
ion Academy is shown in the marvelous ef- 
fects they are obtaining in the designing of 
these paper costumes and they are to be 
congratulated for their cleverness in present- 
ing something that will be so highly unusual 
and original. 



Entirely new — 
Optically correct — 

are the semi-invisible rimless "Colonial" 
eyeglasses which have become so popular 
because of their many decided scientific 
advantages over the old style lenses. They 
are attractive, practical and comfortable, 
and add greatly to one's appearance. 

IV. D. Fennlmore A. R. Fennlmore 

J. W. Darin 




San Francisco - 181 Post, 2508 Mission Sts. 
Berkeley - - - - 2106 Shattuck Avenue 
Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eyebrows arched and moles, warts and 
superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest Improved multiple needle ma- 
chine. Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary Street, Suite 723 Whitney Bide. 

Phone Douglas 6232 
Oakland, Suite 424, First Natl. Bank Bid*. 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

Make Your Reservations 

at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 

Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

• • • • • • 
PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

• • • • • • 
JEWELS In Platinum 

• • • • • • 
REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

• • • • • • 
UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

• • a • • • 

FINE JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 



EXPERT 



Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 12, 1922 





U^inanoal; 

By P. N. BERINGER 




Central American trade is rerv badly off, 
.n general. 



THE price of commodities has been hav- 
ing an upward tendency in a few in- 
stances, but in the majority of cases, about 
20 per cent, has shown a downward ten- 
dency. Quite a number of commodities have 
stood still. Manufactured articles have shown 
an upward tendency, although the changes 
have not been great. 



The crop conditions all over the state are 
good except in the case of certain fruits, such 
as apricots, where the crop is very light. 
The grain crops in California are good ex- 
cept in the interior where the heat has 
shrunk the yield to some extent. In the rest 
of the country rains have hurt the grain 
crops to quite a great extent and the heat, 
too, has damaged the crops. The price is 
down to where it is yielding less than a dol- 
lar a bushel at country stations in the West. 
This refers to the winter wheat crop. 

Money is easier than it has been for some 
time. 



The strikes have done much less injury 
to business in general than ever before in 
such instances. This is mainly due to the 
fact that business men have felt the coal 
operators and the rail managers could han- 
dle the situation even without any govern- 
ment intervention. It is to be regretted the 
administration felt it necessary to straddle 
the question and to grant the returning 
strikers seniority rights. This demand for 
seniority rights to be restored to men who 
willingly gave up their positions and then 
encouraged attacking physically and terror- 
izing those who were willing to work is not 
endorsed by a justice loving couple. No 
man or woman of fair mind quarrels with the 
right of those who may wish for a good rea- 
son or no reason at all to quit their jobs 
but when others who are willing to take 
these jobs do so they must not be inter- 
fered with at all. 



It is a great satisfaction to know that 
your work has been well done and that the 
merited praise for such work is made yours 
by those who are placed above you in the 
management of the business enterprise for 
which you are working. Arthur J. Hill, the 
California manager for the State Life In- 
surance Company of Indiana, recently re- 
ceived word that he led the entire United 
States for personal production in July and 
that Wesley Tilton, the district manager at 
Fresno, was the leader in class B. The Cali- 
fornia agency has the distinction of stand- 
ing second of all states for July with a pro- 
duction which was the largest of any July 
in the history. Mr. Hill is to be congratu- 
lated. 



Negotiations have already been com- 
menced by the refunding commission of the 
United States looking to a rearrangement as 
to payments to this country by European 
nations, but the action taken by Balfour in 
proposing a cancellation of war debts is a 
good deal like throwing a monkey wrench 
in the machinery. Such a proposal was 
looked for but up to date no really respon- 
sible party in any country has ever made 
such a proposition officially. What will be 
done about this remains to be seen, but it 
may be taken for granted that the United 
States will never consent to such an ar- 
rangement, and also it must be taken for 
granted that France is absolutely debarred 
from acceptance of such a plan. A mora- 
torium and some new arrangement as to 
money payments may be made with Ger- 
many and it may well be that the Allies may 
eventually extend their occupation to take 
in Berlin, or France may have to decide to 
do this all by herself, but Germany must re- 
arrange her currency situation and she must 
pay her debts. She must be made to occupy 
a better position toward her own people and 
she must stop the printing of valueless marks. 
Germany has never attempted to tax her 
people properly to raise the necessary money 
for her national budget. Her government has 
allowed a shameful exploitation of the work- 
ing classes and this should be put a stop 
to at once. 



That "there are good times immediately 
ahead" is still one of the lines kept standing 
in type for nearly every article by economic 
writers. But these good lines are very slow 
in materializing. Business is fair to good 
and if matters were more settled in the world 
at large it might very reasonably be ex- 
pected to point to an early resumption of 
very good business conditions. The profits 
of business men are increasing and manu- 
facturers are making more money. 



In some directions industries and business 
affairs are lagging along, just dragging 
themselves through. Those industries de- 
pendent to some extent on foreign trade are 
suffering to a very large extent. It is true 
business has improved in an export way to 
certain countries, while to others there is a 
showing of a very appreciable decrease. Latin 
American trade is dull, trade with China is 
dull, trade with Japan is brightening up, 
trade with the Philippines is slow, and so is 
trade with the Dutch East Indies. Business 
in export and import with India is not good. 
Mexican trade might be developed to a very 
great extent but there seems to be no desire 
on the part of the foreign trader in San 
Francisco to exert himself in that direction. 



All over the United States, in every large 
center, there is much construclioa going on. 
This construction is giving thousands v-ork 
who have been idle until quite recently. There 
is an increased demand for steel, lumber, 
cement, sand and this in turn gives employ- 
ment to others who lately have been unem- 
ployed. Production in the automobile line 
has already passed a mark indicating a re- 
turn to good times and almost a capacity 
pioduction being made, in other industries, 
to a greater or less degree, there is an up- 
ward trend. 



The insurance business, which is a fine 
business barometer, shows a big net gain 
for 1922. 



We have turned the corner in business, 
we are on a straight road and unless un- 
foreseen accidents happen and obstructions 
are placed in the path of progress we can 
follow the straight road which in time will 
lead to prosperous conditions. 



Prosperous conditions cannot arrive ex- 
cept there is peace all over the world. Until 
Germany stops quibbling and gets down to 
real business with the Allies, until the Turk 
quits his fighting and the Greek theirs, until 
Ireland frees Ireland of one or the other kind 
of Irish, until China quits fighting China- 
men, until Brazil settles down to an era of 
peace, until Russia comes out of her red 
trance, and, in fact, until the world at large 
comes into a state of sanity in its inter-re- 
lationship we cannot hope to have that pros- 
perity. 



And the tariff tinkerers in Washington are 
not helping to a very great extent in making 
the export and import business of this coun- 
try easier to handle for the exporter and the 
importer. 



Never, in the history of recent times, was 
there so much of a necessity for the business 
man to take to advertising and advertising 
hard in order to energise and vitalise busi- 
ness. Do it now. 



Here is a company which has a manage- 
ment believing in the value of printer's ink 
in propaganda. The Southern Pacific Com- 
pany in 1921 distributed throughout the 
United States and Europe 6,200,000 folders 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

352 Bush Street 
Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 



August 12, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



15 



"SAVE YOUR TEETH" 

SPONGY, BLEEDING AND SORE 
GUMS ARE WARNINGS OF 

PYORRHEA 

Treat yourself at home with 

PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 

Package with directions postpaid 
tor $1.00 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

908 Market Street, at Powell 
San Francisco 

Please mention News Letter 



'VISIT 



f| 9? 



Catacombi 

AT 

CYPRESS LAW 

CiliiVlK'.lERY 

City Office: 



San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 4772 



Electrical Repairs, Motor Mainte- 
nance, Electrical Fixtures, Wiring, 
Supplies 

Goldberg & Wilson Electric Co. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS AND 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 

2036 Polk Street 

Phone Prospect 752S 

SAN FRANCISCO - - - CALIF. 



and circulars, advertising the resources of all 
kinds of California. 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours: ~ till '. »"d by Appointment 

Phone Suiter 1718 

REMOVED TO 

Howard Building, 209 l'ost Street 

Corner Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



BELVEDERE 

Rent or Sell — Attractive Home 

Etffht Rooms, Two B&thS, Furnished 

SAN GERONIMO 

Delightful Home. Furnished — Six rooms. 

two laths, old ivory finish throughout; 

stream, rustic bridges. Redwoods 

\ri'l,V DR. B. W. HAINES 

r>miKla« S43S 33S «!eiiry St.. Sim Francisco 



The Southern Pacific Company is equip- 
ping itself for a relentless war against all 
rodents and flies. In 1921 it carried on just 
such a war and this was so successful that 
it encouraged the company to carry it on for 
1922. If every individual farmer fought the 
rats and the gophers and if every citizen in 
the towns and cities conscientiously attacked 
rats and flies it would only be a very short 
time when California would be rid of these 
loss and disease breeding pests. Don't wait 
for the other fellow to act, go to it your- 
self. One thing you can do very easily. Do 
not feed flies and rats and they will soon 
starve. The probability is that it is with you 
just as it is with many others, you are feed- 
ing flies and rats just as much food as they 
will eat. Are you? 



The bureau of public roads of the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture at Washington has just 
issued a compilation which goes to show that 
there is available $750,000,000 for auto- 
motive highway construction. California 
leads all the forty-eight states in the amount 
to be spent for the coming year. This 
amounts to $53,000,000, and the next in 
point of expenditure is Pennsylvania. The 
Quaker state is followed by Illinois, New 
York and Texas, in the order named. 



The mining conditions are unchanged ex- 
cept that there seems a still wider discrep- 
ancy exists in relation to price of stock and 
production of bullion at the mines. One 
would think that production would have an 
immediate effect up or down on the price 
of certain stocks, but that is not at all so. 
Apparently, in the case of some of the stock 
of producing mines, the original stock sold 
in the last few years brought so high a 
price that it has prevented any movement 
whatever on the exchange and the stock re- 
mains "frozen" while the small amount 
which is being gambled in does not in any 
way reflect conditions at the mine as to pro- 
duction or as to future prospects. 



St. Mary's 
cAcademy 

San Leandro. California 



Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gough 
Telephone rark 271 



(25 years in business) Kearny 2842 

ENJOY YOUR VACATION BY 
HAVING YOUR 

HAIR PERMANENTLY 
WAVED 

— at — 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

360 Geary Street 
San Francisco 

We consider the health of your hair. 
Mr. J. and Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Toni's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Ty pewrite r Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made » lilttc better than weem* necenitary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 

durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 

- are sold in similar Vjoxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 

!• r. or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1SS5 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 12, 1922 




PL/EASURE/S WAND 



Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




Players Theater 

"The First Fifty Years" is a unique play 
in seven episodes with two people in the cast. 
Henry Myers has written a thoroughly in- 
teresting, but unsatisfying, dramatic com- 
ment on married life, and William Rainey 
and Evelyn Vaughan have ably portrayed 
the couple through the half century that falls 
upon therr between the wonderful honey- 
moon night that they come into their little 
home as bride and groom, to the day of 
their golden wedding when they sit in the 
same room, old woman and old man, look- 
ing back over the years. The intervening 
anniversaries are intensely painful occasions; 
we are obliged to watch the ruthless destruc- 
tion by these two people of their happiness, 
and so thorough is the havoc that little sym- 
pathy is felt for either of them — only re- 
gret that "fools rush in where angels fear 
to tread.". That, if any, is the point of the 
play — ill-suited pairs spoil the heaven that 
might be theirs. The acting of William 
Rainey is something that this critic always 
has to mention with curb on pen, so greatly 
is it admired. But Mr. Rainey is a romantic 
actor, and it seems rather too bad to ex- 
pend his rare talent on so commonplace a 
part as this married man person. Beautiful 
Evelyn Vaughan did some excellent acting 
as the wife, and was completely buried in 
flowers at the close of the first scene. A 
very distinguished audience witnessed the 
first performance of the play. I noticed 
Emily Melville and William H. Crane chat- 
ting animatedly in a box, and all the critics 
were there. 



Portola 

As playwright and actress, Leah Baird dis- 
tinguishes herself this week in her own pic- 
ture "When the Devil Drives." The play has 
a strong plot and is well constructed and ad- 
mirably acted. The cast includes Richard 
Tucker, Arline Pretty, Katherine Lewis and 
Vernon Steel. Miss Baird has a part well 
suited to her particular style of acting. 

Larry Semon.in "The Head Waiter" cre- 
ates much mirth in the audience and terrible 
destruction among the crockery. The news 
film and music are of a high order. 



SAM fRAMClSCO 



w N/vyot^uxt 




! 



MAT ™™ 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted In Dress Circle 
and Loges 



Orpheum Has Fine New Bill 

Gus Edwards is again in our midst, and 
this time his annual revue of musical fes- 
tivity is called "A Fountain of Youth." His 
company is strong and strikingly young 
throughout, with all the dash and spirit that 
make a performance like this take hold of 
an audience. Young Chester Edwards, the 
Oakland boy dancer whom Edwards took 
several years ago under his tutelage, has 
some new and sensational eccentric dances, 
and a score of other talented young artists 
are included in the cast, giving a really beau- 
tiful and entertaining show. 

Tom Smith, "artist, gentleman, scholar," 
has a fund of sharp humor and an interesting 
act. Joe Roiley at Palm Beach — he is out 
for fun and he creates a lot of it. Joe is 
one of the best black-face comedians in 
vaudeville. The Oriental dancer called Prin- 
cess Radjah goes through some weird con- 
tortions without moving her feet. 



Imperial 

In "The Storm" the vast range of camera 
possibilities are presented to us with startling 
effect. The picture is made in that wonderful 
country where stand the Canadian Rockies 
and beautiful scenery is shown as well as 
forest fires, snow storms, a wildly rushing 
river bearing a canoe. Woven into this mag- 
nificent pattern of grandest nature and the 
fury of the elements, is a powerful love 
story. House Peters, that able actor, has 
come into his own, and his part in "The 
Storm" is played with splendid vigor. Vir- 
ginia Valli is the heroine. Matt Moore does 
excellent work in a rigorous role. 

Prior's orchestra and a number of short 
reels complete an excellent program. 



Columbia 

"Little Old New York" closes a most suc- 
cessful fortnight this evening. The comedy 
has a historical background and the char- 
acters have traditions; with such good ma- 
terial Rida Johnson Young has woven a 
play of great charm. The vivacity of Isa- 
belle Lowe in the part of Patricia O'Day 
and the smooth and agreeable acting of 
Creighton Hale as Larry Delavan lend added 
attraction to the excellent performance. 

On Monday evening these two stars, to- 
gether with Mrs. Thomas Whiffen, a popular 
New York "old timer," will appear in one 
of Henry Miller's metropolitan successes, 
"Just Suppose." 



Strand 

The management has brought back D. W. 
Griffith's French Revolution "Orphans of the 
Storm" for an additional showing. This is 
the film that made such a decided triumph 
abroad as well as at home, and it certainly 
is worthy of a second run. The story deals 
with France during the revolutionary times 
and includes all the notable figures of his- 
tory. The cast includes the Gish sisters, 
Monte Blue, Joseph Shildkraut and many 



ethers of lesser note but equal, if not better, 
acting ability. The musical arrangement is 
particularly good and well taken care of by 
Fitzpatrick's ensemble. The program is 
rounded out with short reels of popular in- 
terest. 



California 

The California knows how, and this week 
presents a well balanced program consisting 
of music, good comedy and a compelling 
feature film, "Divorced Coupons," with Cor- 
rinne Griffith in the role of the girl who an- 
nounced that she was getting a marriage cer- 
tificate with divorce coupons attached. 

"My Wife's Relations" is Buster Keaton's 
mirth provoker, and the adventures of this 
serious looking young cut-up with his various 
"in-laws" are indeed amusing. 

Brown's Saxaphone Six made popular mu- 
sic for enthusiastic listeners and Severi is 
at his best in selections from "The Firefly." 



Granada's Thriller 

"The Fast Mail," Lincoln Carter's melo- 
drama, contains all the exciting elements 
known to man. Moving with tremendous 
force we pass through a series of races with 
automobiles and trains, horses and handcars, 
into terrific encounters with desperadoes; en- 
dure the dangers of an explosion on a steam- 
boat, and experience narrow escapes from 
violent death in so many ways that we are 
left in a state of bewilderment when it is all 
over and we find ourselves sitting quite safe 
in a comfortable Granada lodge. The play 
begins auspiciously in the Sunny South, 
where an old negro mammy tells the heroine's 
fortune in tea leaves. Eileen Percy, Charles 
Jones, Adolph Menjou and a large cast of 



HOTEL PLA7A 

San francisco 



DINING-ROOM 

Surprisingly good meals 
pleasingly served. Note 
t h e moderate prices : 

JrcnkfaKt 25c to 70c 
Luncheon 65c 
Olnuer $1.2a 

(A la Carte Service also) 




August 12. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



17 



able players interpret the piece in a satis- 
factory manner. 

"Dances of the Nations" surpass anything 
the Granada has done in the way of dance 
novelties. Ruth St. Denis and Anita Peters 
Wright have combined their talents to make 
this an artistic success, and with a company 
of fifteen dancers, their production is a tri- 
umph. 

Paul Ash and his orchestra have a program 
that delights the audience this week, and so 
gjeat is their popularity that they threaten 
to "stop the show." Especially pleasing to 
the lovers of jazz was Clark Wilson's saxo- 
phone solo, "By the Sapphire Seas." 



Century 

The second week of "Letty Pepper" is 
on in full swing. The elongated Charlotte 
Greenwood and Ray Raymond head the cast 
and do the best work, though the cast is 
well rounded and quite capable. There 
could be more melodies and better voices, to 
be sure, but the musical comedy fans will 
hardly complain as there is enough humor 
and action to make up. Some gorgeous 
gowns are very adequately displayed on the 
human models, much to the interest of the 
front-seaters. 



Alcazar 

Booth Tarkington is always interesting and 
generally amusing. "Seventeen" combines 
both and scores heavily because of the fine 
work done by the principal characters. Ran- 
kin Mansfield could not have been improved 
upon as the young man of the house. He 
has caught the spirit of the play and given 
a fine interpretation. The casting of Miss 
Van Buren as the baby-talk girl, however, 
was unfortunate. This actress has consider- 
able talent and should never have been called 
upon to take such a part. The remainder 
of the large cast fits in splendidly and were 
fine support for the lead. Little Ida Maye 
as Jane Baxter deserves praise for not over- 
doing the part. Ned Doyle and his dog got 
the most laughs, and it is pleasing to remark 
that his colored impersonation is a great 
improvement over the pullman porter role 
he essayed a few weeks ago. The settings 
this week are well conceived and pleasing, 
though we all expected to see the light in the 
i upper window during the serenade. This 
play is to run but one week, to be followed 
by "The Mountain Man," featuring the re- 
turn of the ever popular Dudley Ayres. 

Alcazar 

Dudley Ayres, the Alcazar's popular and 
talented leading man, has been re-engaged 
by Belasco & Mayer for another season and 
will make his re-appearance Sunday matinee, 
August 13. One of the most fascinating 
plays to be seen in recent years, "The Moun- 
tain Man," by Clare Kummer, has been se- 
lected as the vehicle for his home coming. 
In the stellar role he will have one of the 
really big chances of his career and it was 
by reason of his exceptional fitness for it 
that the piece was chosen for presentation 
at this time. 

(Catherine Van Buren will appear in the 
principal feminine characterization, one in 



which her winning personality can best be 
displayed. Ida Maye and Rankin Mansfield 
will be found agreeably cast and the other 
parts exceptionally well handled. Great prep- 
arations are being made for the production 
by Stage Director Hugh Knok and the scenic 
investure will be a feature. 



Orpheum Next Week 

Roscoe Ails, great cyclonic comedian, a 
newcomer to the West, with a great com- 
pany, which includes clever Kate Pullman; 
Tom Smith, a laugh provoker; Princess Wah- 
Letka, a remarkable woman who can read 
your mind and can foresee future events. 
Said to be the wonder of the age; Joe Rol- 
ley, a funny blackface comic; Gus Edwards 
for his final week here is going to put on 
another revue. All new costumes, numbers 
and some more surprises; Laurel Less, "The 
Chummy Chatter," has pep, personality and 
ability; Kerekjarto, a genuis of the violin 
who was such a success upon his last ap- 
pearance here that the management was 
forced to bring him back for a return en- 
gagement for one week; Heras & Wells are 
backyard entertainers and offer a great nov- 
elty. 



CHARLES G. JOHNSON, REPUBLICAN 

CANDIDATE FOR STATE 

TREASURER 

Charles G. Johnson was State Superin- 
tendent of Weights and Measures for eight 
years, and during his incumbency saved the 
women of California households in dollars 




and cents an incalculable sum of money. He 
is the author of the Net Container Act, the 
Public Weight-Master Act and weights and 
measure laws now on the statute books of 
the state. 

Behind his record as a state official, John- 
son has twenty years of banking and com- 
mercial experience. 

In making his fight for State Treasurer, 
Johnson stands on his record as public ser- 
vice. He was the first of the three aspirants 
in the field for the Republican nomination 
to announce his candidacy. He will poll a 
heavy vote in Northern California and with 



two Southern California candidates against 
him, his headquarters predict that he will re- 
ceive more than his share of votes south of 
the Tehachapi. 

Johnson has an mtimate knowledge of 
state affairs. He has taken an active part 
in public matters for many years. As State 
Superintendent of Weights and Measures he 
had representatives of his office in every 
county in California and of necessity was 
in close touch with county affairs through- 
out his eight years at the capital. 



At Del Monte 

— The largest and gayest gathering of so- 
ciety of the year will take place the latter 
part of this month for the holding of the 
annual California golf championships. The 
contests on the links will get under way on 
August 25 to 27, with the holding of the 
Del Monte summer tournament, and on Sep- 
tember 2 to 10 the championships are to 
hold sway. 

—Mr. and Mrs. William Taft of New 
York City have been spending a quiet but 
delightful sojourn at Del Monte. The Tafts 
have motored a great deal and are great 
lovers of the scenic beauty on the Monterey 
peninsula. 



— Commercial highway transportation is 
here to stay, providing the highways stay. 
The highways will stay if they are not over- 
loaded and abused beyond their strength 
and beyond the financial ability of public 
agencies to maintain them. If the use of 
present highways is not limited to the weight 
of traffic that they were built to carry, they 
will break down and with them will vanish 
the transportation that is dependent upon 
their integrity. It would seem, therefore, 
that truck associations should work for 
adoption of such weight limits and speed 
regulations as would protect existing high- 
ways until they can be brought up to a 
heavier standard instead of attempting to 
secure the highest possible maximum weight 
and the lowest possible license fee. Most 
truck associations' arguments look to the 
load and rate of speed from a standpoint 
of cheapness of freight and passenger rates 
only, ignoring the fact that their ability to 
transport at all depends upon the existence 
of the highway over which they travel. 



— Bishop and Mrs. William Ford Nichols 
will go to Portland in September and from 
there East to be away until Christmas and 
possibly much longer. While East they will 
visit their daughter, Mrs. Charles Mills, and 
family at Milton, Mass. 



PLAYERS THEATRE 

Bnafa St., n*>nr Gooffb Phone Weel ISS1 
2nd week commencing Moil, Aug. nth 

MfttlneM Tiic-ilav ami *><ittir<laf 

"The First 50 Years" 

By Henry Myers, with 

EVELYN VAUGHAN & 
WILLIAM S. RAINEY 

"AbSOTblngly interesting "—S. F. Call 

Evenings. $1 and $1.50; Matinee?. 5 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 12, 1922 



The Automobile 



Good Roads 

The prosperity that has come to the rural 
districts of the United States is directly trace- 
able to the effects of the good roads that 
have been built by the state authorities. 
Starting in the late 90's with an agitation 
by the members of the civil engineering pro- 
fession the movement to improve the roads 
of the country gained but little headway 
until the automobile became an economic 
factor in the life of the citizens of the farms 
and the ^mall communities. 

Previous to the advent of the motor ve- 
hicle the farmer was satisfied with the dirt 
roads that threaded the countryside, but when 
he owned a pleasure car or a motor truck 
he quickly realized the advantages of the al- 
ways smooth surfaced road, and he is now 
the strongest advocate of the extension of 
the already large system into all the dis- 
tricts of the land. 

It is estimated by government engineers, 
who have to do with highways, that more 
than 350,000,000 tons of produce and mer- 
chandise are transported over these public 
highways during a single year. When the 
first investigation was made it was found 
that the expense of hauling was 23 cents 
per ton mile. Recently other tests have been 
made which show that the average cost has 
been brought down to 1 3 cents per ton mile. 
It becomes evident from these figures that 
the dweller in the cities, who are not owners 
of motor cars, are as much benefited by 
good roads as the farmers themselves, as 
the savings made are reflected in lower 
prices. When it is taken into consideration 
that every 10 cents in cost that the farmer 
adds to his prices is multiplied again and 
again by the middlemen who pass it on to 
the consumer, one can appreciate that the 
savings accumulate to much more than the 
10 or 12 cents a ton that these tests showed. 



Avoiding the Bumps 

It is not always a case of avoiding the 
bumps. It would be a great deal better if 
there were no bumps, but the ideal road 
has, as yet, not been built. Bumps will ap- 
pear, through wear and tear, in the best of 
roads and negligence will occur as to re- 
pairs. That is why the Gabriel Snubbers 
should be brought to mind and used on your 
machine. You certainly can control the 
bouncing of your car through the use of the 
Gabriel Snubbers. Your attention is called 
to the advertisement of the Pacific Auto- 
motive Service, Inc., in another column of 
this issue of the News Letter. 



Oils and Oils 

There can be no doubt about it that there 
are oils and oils and that some are used as 
oils and others as lubricants. The difference 
is that oiling, as a rule, will not do a motor 
much good- It is absolutely necessary to 
know just what you are doing and, in any 
event, you should use an oil which 
has been demonstrated as a lubricant. Mara- 
thon Motor Oils will do this, lubricate prop- 



erly. Marathon Motor Oils obviate having 
any doubt in the matter at all. You can be 
sure of proper lubrication and that is what 
you want in order to do that which is best 
for your car. The Joseph Mulvihill Com- 
pany are just now entering upon a state cam- 
paign and they have a very good proposition 
to offer to dealers as to Marathon oils. Their 
advertising literature is very attractive and 
they are issuing a booklet on scientific lubri- 
cation which should be in the hands of every 
automobile owner. It is called "The Master 
Oiler," and it is furnished free of cost to 
those who are interested. 



" Bout the same as now. Gals and madri- 



gals. 



-Judge. 



Same Ingredients 

"Now I see they had comic opera in the 
thirteenth century." 

"How was it constituted?" 





Fred Kahn 

Automotive Engineering in its 
Entirety 

UNDER ONE ROOF 






General Repairing and Overhauling 

Feaider and" Ignition 
Radiator Work Welding 
Body Building Brazing 
Woodwook Blacksmithing 
Machine Work Electrical 
(arburetion 






Experts in Every Branch 
1507 SUTTER Telephone West 8296 

Authorized Elgin Parts and Service 





Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 45S6 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. LeidesdorrT 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 




WE KNOW HOW 

Your car is piling up a big repair bill 
every mile you drive without proper 
lubrication. You can depend upon 

LOYAL AND EFFICIENT SERVICE 
at the 

DE LUXE GARAGE & SERVICE STATION 

Post and Hyde Sts. Phone Franklin 3 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing- manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Prank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



Watch Your Feet 




Weak, fallen or broken arches reduce 
your efficiency, cause headache, back- 
ache, sciatica, pelvic and stomach trou- 
ble, as well as other ailments. 

THE POST SYSTEM 

for foot correction restores the flexi- 
bility and resiliency of the feet. 

The Post System for Foot Correction 
259 Geary Street, San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6147 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND | 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital. 
Reserve Fund.... 



Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept., 1921 




25,000,000.00 
17,500,000.00 

25.000,000.00 



$ 67,500,000.00 



. $359,326, 760. 00 



OSCAR LINES, General Manager 

359 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, 

Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of 

Australasian Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of Calif., National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bk., Crocker Nat'l Bk. 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1922 

Assets $76,170,177.18 

Deposits 72,470,177.18 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds ... 2,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund - 385,984.61 

A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4 54) percent 
per annum was declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3/4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid l'p Capital ¥15,000,000 Total Assets Over S479.000.000 ¥15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

486 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



LEE S. DOLSON 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 
of Automobiles 



We Stand for the Best in Business 
Training 




For 
PRIVATE SECRETARIES 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 
Send for Catalog 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.)— . 75c 

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Portland Seattle 



Established July 12(1, IS6fl 




PR,C E „CENTS TAX pAYERS WEEKLY *S.O, PER VE AR 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 1 







LOS ANGELES 



Oust Extravagance — Inaugurate Economy || 

IN STATE GOVERNMENT 



State costs increased 
74 per cent in 1921 
over 1919, despite 
promises of a reduc- 
tion of the state tax 
burden by the admin- 
istration. 

Heavy taxes stifle in- 
dustry, cause unem- 
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aiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 




More business and less 
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is Richardson's slo- 
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for efficiencv. 



Elect FRIEND W. RICHARDSON 

Republican Candidate for Governor 

This advertisement is paid for by a supporter of Mr. Richardson. 




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NOTICE 

In the Superior Court of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. 

In the matter of the application of the San Fran- 
cisco News Letter and California Advertiser, 
to be declared a newspaper of general cir- 
culation under the provisions of section 4460 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Notice is hereby given that Frederick Marriott 
has filed in the above entitled court a petition 
alleging that the San Francisco News Letter and 
California Advertiser, is and ever since July 
20. 1856, has been a newspaper established, 
printed and published at regular intervals, 
namely, on each Saturday, excepting the Sat- 
urday following the great fire of April 18, 1906, 
for the dissemination of local and telegraphic 
news and intelligence of general character and 
having a bonafide subscription list of paying 
subscribers, and that it has been declared to be 
a newspaper of general circulation by decree 
of the above entitled court given in or about 
the year 1880. but that the records thereof have 
been destroyed and asking that it be adjudged 
and decreed to be a newspaper of general cir- 
culation within the provision of section 4460 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Said order will be applied for before Depart- 
ment No. 1 of the above entitled court 
upon Tuesday, September 1-. 1H22. at the hour 
of 10 a. m. at which time and place any person 
interested may appear and show cause if any 
they have why said petition should not be 
granted. 
Dated June 28, 1922. 

FREDERICK MARRIOTT. 
C. F. Adams. Attorney at Law, 703 Market St. 



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ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1866 
Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CI 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, AUGUST 19, 1922 



No. 7 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— The headlines said that U. S. turned down plea for Ng Ka Py. 
Thought is was something about radio and found out it was Chinese 
booze. 

— We told you so. • It is unkind of us to remind you of that fact. 
But we said the London parley would end by being a parley and 
that is all. 

— Would it be possible to innoculate conductors on the San Fran- 
cisco street car lines with the virus of politeness, exhibited in Oak- 
land, and get results? 

— We are all of us interested in keeping down the cost of con- 
struction. In order to help that idea along we should vote down 
the anti-shingling ordinance. 

— Two men married two sisters and two daughters were born 
on the same day to the two men and women. That is what may 
be called living strictly on a schedule. 

— Let us have peace — in Ireland, in Turkey, in China, in Mes- 
opotamia, in India, in Siberia, and in many other places — and the 
world will be all right again once more. 

— We wonder if it pays the daily newspaper in San Francisco to 
play up the preacher and the politician. They have long ago ex- 
hausted their bags of tricks and are no longer interesting. 

— Any strike or any lock-out is a loss and nobody ever recovers 
from the loss, no matter which side wins. Isn't there enough strong 
common sense in this country to stop strikes and lock-outs? 

* * * 

— Last week could be very readily called "convention week" be- 
cause of the entertaining of three or four big conventions at one 
and the same time in San Francisco. Surely San Francisco knows 

how. 

* * * 

—Bill Hart, it is said, has played the movie villain to his wife 
and she is now said to seek the divorce courts as a relief. Farrar's 
husband claimed, at one time, that Geraldine insisted on waking 
him at night to tell him she was very much like the grand opera 
heroines she portrayed on the stage and because he yawned she 
locked the door on him. Being temperamental always has its draw- 
backs for some one. 



— Last week the search was on for a woman in the Wilkens case, 
and now they are searching quite as eagerly for a motive. Other- 
wise the case is said to be set very strongly for conviction by the 
prosecution. 

— The woman who kept a pack of hounds, eleven in number, to 
protect her from possible attack by men, must have had an inor- 
dinate idea of her attractiveness. And one man is dead in conse- 
quence of this idea of hers, it seems. 

— A male movie star kisses a female likewise, who happens to 
be his wife, in a studio at Hollywood, to prove that there isn't going 
to be a divorce. Huh! What does one kiss prove? Or more than 
one, for that matter, in a movie studio? 

— Three hundred and fifty thousand criminals in the United 
States is the estimate of careful and painstaking lawyers who lay 
that great number to the fact we all disregard the law or exhibit 
mawkish sympathy with the criminal. Time to stop. 

— If the national legislators only knew what is best for the coun- 
try they would drop the tariff legislation like a hot potato and 
streak it out for home, after giving the strike the attention it de- 
serves at their hands. Monkeying with the tariff always does more 
harm than good. 

— Interest in the movies is said to be waning and the attendance 
is turning back to the spoken play. If that is so, the spoken play 
should be improved and the different attractions should be thoroughly 
advertised. The movie has, in many instances, received a lot of 
unpaid for and undeserved publicity. 

— The Allies seem to be getting wobbly over the German situa- 
tion and Germany goes right on printing paper marks with the view 
of making the situation at home just about as bad as it can be made. 
The French want to take the Ruhr basin and want to levy on what- 
ever they can lay their hands on in Germany that is of any value. 

* * * 

— The Big Four striking at any point on a line like the Santa Fe 
means until strike conditions are remedied in effect the same condi- 
tions established all over the line and is much more expensive for 
the road than would be a general strike. It is guerrilla warfare 
of the worst kind. The government should take the road and op- 
erate it. 

* * * 

— Apparently in Oregon the opposition to the K. K. K. has come 
to a show down and it is a religious quarrel. The K. K. K. is cred- 
ited with open opposition to the Catholic Church and the Catholics 
are in the same boat apparently as the K. K. K. All of which is 
to be regretted and all of which should make us go very slow in 
endorsing movements to oust from public positions men who belong 
to the K. K. K. or any other kind of organization. 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




The permission given by the Big Four to 
The Big Four Guerillas members of the Brotherhoods to quit work, 
whenever they think their lives are in danger 
through a run-down condition of cars or locomotives or by reason of 
being abused by armed and irresponsible guards, is a piece of good 
generalship in the handling of the strike on the part of the railroad 
workers but it is one of the most dangerous weapons to use in such 
an emergen :y. 

Everyone knows that the danger from rail equipment, which is not 
in good condition, is being lessened every day and it is further known 
that the Brotherhood men have not been threatened or abused by the 
guards employed by the rail lines or placed in charge of property by 
the government. In giving this permission to their members the 
Brotherhoods avoid responsibility and, at the same time, grant letters 
of marque for local unions to pirate and prey on the railroads in aid 
of the striking union members. 

It is high time the government took control of the rail lines and ran 
them in a way to suit the public needs without regard to the demands 
of the strikers or their assistants in the Brotherhoods. 

This country was dictated to, during the war, when a period of 
stringent necessity for rail service was before the nation at all times 
but it is too big a country and that example of how a rail union or 
several of them may hold up Uncle Sam at will is too fresh in our 
memory to allow it to take place again. 

We have definitely come to the point where it will have to be de- 
cided whether we are willing to turn over the government of the, 
country to Mr. Gompers and his very able assistants or whether we 
are going to keep the reins of government in our own hands. It is 
simply a question as to whether a thoroughly well organized and dis- 
ciplined minority may dictate to an unorganized and undisciplined 
majority. It is a question whether the people of the country, as repre- 
sented by that majority, is willing to relinquish its rights in the mat- 
ter and delegate all power to organized labor, as represented by these 
striking unions and their friends and sympathizers. 



The building now boom is still on and those 
The Build Now Move who did build earlier in the year are reaping 

a harvest in rentals. This is true not only of 
business structures but of residences. In every direction there still 
seems to be a great scarcity of housing. With the coming of winter 
this scarcity will make itself felt in a more pronounced manner. In 
nearly all of the suburban districts where although there has been a 
great deal of building, the empty house is the rarity. It is a most 
astonishing fact that property owners so often overlook the oppor- 
tunities offering themselves to improve their incomes. For instance, 
down-town San Francisco, that section of the city devoted exclu- 
sively to business, is dotted with empty lots. These lots have been 
devoted to the use of the public as catch-alls, since the big fire. In 
most instances these lots could have very easily been turned into in- 
come producing, tax paying property by the erection of buildings. 
Buildings have not been put upon these lots and the owners have 
been satisfied to wait for their neighbors to give an added value to 
their holdings without any effort or investment by the owner of the 
property. It is one of the worst conditions in this city that so much 
of this property lies vacant today and is unproductive. 



We have had the visit of many notable men in the last 
Notables two or three weeks, and among these was the vice presi- 
dent of the United States, Mr. Coolidge. Mr. Coolidge 
is a man of very few words and he seems to have dispensed with 
any very long speeches while in the city. He is a man who very 
easily makes friends, however, and these friends are always of the 



intensely loyal variety. Quite distinctly different in his characteristics, 
we have had with us Judge Taft. His broad smile and genial per- 
sonality radiates happiness on all with whom he comes in contact, 
and his popularity in San Francisco is great. He is a cosmoplite and 
fits in everywhere and at any time. Judge Taft is welcome here al- 
ways and will always be given two hands in fellowship. 



Friend W. Richardson, the candidate for the 
It Is Only Too True nomination for governor stresses the fact that 
economy is needed as to running the State of 
California and that he will practice economy, if elected. Richard- 
son has made a good record as treasurer of the state; in fact, Mr. 
Richardson is one of the well known notables of California whose 
record is his very best recommendation. 

This is, of course, said about every other candidate and is dwelt 
upon strenuously by the candidate himself. In the case of Friend 
W. Richardson it is absolutely unnecessary for him to say any- 
thing at all, except to outline his platform. The people, who so 
thoroughly know him, will do the rest. Mr. Richardson is reported 
as charging the present administration, and especially the Governor, 
with a reckless extravagance. The budget requirements, under the 
Stephens regime, have increased 154 per cent. The population has 
increased only 25 per cent. From a budget of $35,000,000 in 1915- 
16 the cost of government in this state has mounted to $91,000,000 
in 1921-22, according to the charges made by Mr. Richardson. 

Mr. Richardson's own words are perhaps a better evidence than 
anything which might be said in comment. He says, "As state 
treasurer I have been in a position to see the reckless extravagance 
practiced and to know how the costs of government can be reduced, 
without hampering any humane, progressive or educational func- 
tions of the state. 

"I favor justice to our war heroes; every possible aid to farmers; 
fair dealing with labor; strict enforcement of all laws and protec- 
tion of life and property." 

No better platform could be devised upon which to elect a man 
for governor. 



The rail strikers have shown the most co- 
The Colossal Nerve lossal nerve of any strikers engaged in that 
delectable outdoor and indoor sport in years. 
They struck, quit their jobs, attacked those who were willing to 
work, demolished property, destroyed trackage, beat up working 
men, bombed round houses, and in every way annoyed their former 
employers and attempted to make their property of less value than 
when they were on the job. And now the colossal nerve! They 
profess a willingness to come back to work, to accept terms of set- 
tlement, but they tack on to this the proposition that, having given 
up their jobs and their rights, these rights consisting in a very large 
measure in the seniority held by them, a reward for faithful ser- 
vice and loyalty, that the railroad companies grant them a return 
of the seniority rights they themselves threw to the winds. 

Should the railroad managements grant these seniority rights it 
would virtually amount to a recognition of the fact that these un- 
willing workers threw down their tools, temporarily, while they 
enforced their will on their employers and that, having been suc- 
cessful in the staged hold-up, they will now return to work and 
take everything there is in sight belonging to them in perpetuity. 

For the rail managements to grant this right to the seniorities 
would be to establish a precedent in labor disputes, and their ad- 
justment with labor unions, that would bedevil us forever and would 
establish the right of organized labor to exclude any other kind of 
labor from employment. It would establish the fact that employers, 
and the public, have no rights at all, when it comes to a question 



August 19, 1022 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



as between themselves and union labor, that union labor is bound 
to respect or take into consideration. 



The city Supervisors are showing some activ- 
That Enabling Act ity in getting down to practical things about 

the purchase of the Market Street system. They 
have decided to ask the people of San Francisco to authorize them 
to buy that part of the Market Street Railway being operated in 
San Mateo County and the provision enabling them to do so will 
be placed on the November ballot. The probability is that nego- 
tiations by the special committee, having the purchase in charge, 
will finally come to some sort of an agreement with the representa- 
tives of the railway before the November election as to that por- 
tion of the system within the limits of San Francisco. At any rate, 
that is what seems to be the intention of the committee, at this time, 
if the committee heeds the wishes of all concerned. Outside the 
body of the Board of Supervisors there seems to be a unanimous 
opinion to get on as rapidly as possible in this purchase but within 
the board opposition has always appeared to delay matters, when 
such opposition was the last thing to be expected. It is the hope, 
openly expressed by all classes of citizens, that this kind of oppo- 
sition has at last seen its day and that nothing more will now crop 
up to prevent a business-like and careful conclusion of negotia- 
tions as to price with the officials of the Market Street Railway 
by the special committee of the Board of Supervisors. 



the vast tax-paying majority, owning the university, decides for 
clothes as against nakedness or partial nakedness in histrionic de- 
velopment, the governing student body will have to take notice and 
mend its ways. 



We have heard from various well inten- 
Movie Wives and Husbands tioned women and men that the Holly- 
wood colony of movie people is really 
no different from any colony of any other kind of people, located at 
any old place. We have been told by these moral white-washers that 
movie people have the same actions and re-actions as other more or 
less moral people in everyday life. The white-wash wielders have 
smeared it on thick and fast and have told us that Hollywood was 
one of the most respectable and quiet neighborhoods in the world and 
that these nice young people behaved much in the same way as other 
nice young people comport themselves in other localities. The mov- 
ing picture, it was said, had no effect on the movie actress and actor. 
Now, all of the above may have appeared to be so to the well- 
intentioned white-washers but from the evidence Hollywood furnishes 
to bear out the white-washers' statements somebody has not been 
telling the exact truth about things in general and in particular. 

We had got quite used to a scandal every three or four days but 
last week the climax was capped with four of these in one day. The 
weather must have something to do with it and not the movie actress 
and actor business. We are told the weather has been quite sultry in 
the film borough of the City of the Chemically Pure and so we will 
blame it all on the weather. Rotten weather that. 



Some parent individual has been writing to 
Clothes or No Clothes the newspapers voicing the protest of a great 
number of people as to the tendency at our 
university to devote much time to histrionic development of the un- 
clothed character among the students. It may not be denied that 
there is a growing protest as to any dramas and dances of the par- 
tially unclothed variety. This protest is getting to be more vigorous 
right along. There is another style of protest and that is regarding the 
production of plays having even less clothing to cover their naked- 
ness than the actors taking part. The parent public is not at all de- 
sirous of seeing a continuation of plays that are being produced in 
which morality stalks in stark nakedness or where morality does not 
enter into the play at all. 

A great many people, besides those in attendance at the university, 
are interested in its welfare and these people are in such a vast ma- 
jority that their will should be of some moment to the governing stu- 
dent body. If it is to be a decision, as to clothes or no clothes, and 



Some lawyers, who are supposed to keep 
A Big Gain in Crimes abreast of the times statistically, brought out 

very clearly last week that the crime industry 
is gaining on us and that criminal acts of the first magnitude are 
claiming the attention of our people and that a wave of extraordinary 
size and duration is sweeping the country just now and that this has 
been going on for some time. We are inclined to protest against lay- 
ing any of the blame on the prohibition law and we suggest that the 
increased use of narcotics may have little to do with the attempt to 
make the country as dry as it is possible to make it. To be sure, the 
effort is of such a feeble character that the dryness, which is sup- 
posed to ensue, isn't so very apparent but there is consolation to some 
that the effort is really being made to squelch the bootlegger and 
destroy the moonshiner. The crime increase has been laid to the war. 
It is said to be the result of the war. If that is so, there should be a 
much greater ratio of increase in crime in England, France and Bel- 
gium. War must have a different effect over there, as the crime rec- 
ords of England have decreased. There is little or no crime in France 
and Belgium is so darn busy trying to recover from the damages in- 
flicted by Germany that no one has any time for crime. And, besides 
all of this — it must be remembered that it is only in very few in- 
stances indeed any veteran of the Great War has been found impli- 
cated in crime. The war has given these men of the Legion a responsi- 
bility and a patriotism which will not allow them to take part in any- 
thing disgraceful or criminal. So, those who are guessing at why the 
increase in crime will have to make a few more guesses why, after 
eliminating the war and various other excuses, which can easily be 
shown to have no bearing on the case. We do know, however, that 
crimes of magnitude and of violence are on the increase and that this 
increase is being made more rapidly as time wears on. 



Strikes and lockouts, as we have often said, 
The Effect of Strikes cause losses which may in no way be made 
good. The strike and the lockout belong in the 
dark ages of industrial development. They are the weapons of primi- 
tive man; man who will not listen to reason and who stands on get- 
ting what he wants, regardless, usually, of the rights of the other 
fellow. 

Such a stand is inevitable, whenever class consciousness is the basis 
on which union laborism or capitalism is dependent for its success. It 
is not far removed from the standpoint of the cave man or woman 
and it is dependent usually on force and intolerance for its success. 

The losses entailed, through a strike or a walkout or a lockout, are 
primarily levied on those who make these conditions possible but, in 
the final analysis, these costs are always borne by the public at large, 
in the form of increased cost of living and increased taxation. And 
there is no good reason why the strike and the lockout should be tol- 
erated for one minute by the people of the country because there are 
other ways, there must be other ways and saner ways, through which 
to arrive at the justice of any situation which may demand adjust- 
ment between the employed and the employer. There is no reason 
why the strike and the lockout should be tolerated, because if the 
people were not cowards they would tell the workingman or woman 
and the business man or manufacturer employer to compose their 
differences in some other way, some way that will not involve the 
rest of us in losses and which will much more quickly and more effec- 
tively settle moot questions. 



— The welcome news is given the coal strike may be over "in two 
days" — this time the news comes from the head of the coal strikers. 
He may know what he is talking about. 



6 SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER August 19, 1922 



m 



mmita 



the Woman 



MRiMaigmaaBigMigKi gHHiaiawaiaa.gafaHBWKi.Bifgi'aiaBiBiiiBiBBB 

IN THE Willcens case a woman was pointed out by the news- 
papers as the probable cause of the murder of his wife by 
Wilkens or by those who are said to have been associated with him. 
A woman must be found at the bottom of this crime. 

The re .son for finding the woman is because some old French 
book detective said some time or other in the dim and distant past 
that you must always seek the woman in any criminal case. In 
other words, the novel writing detective inferred that no crime ever 
was committed unless some woman was connected with it as 
the urge. 

And, apologizing to all of those who have picked up the cry and 
are always looking for the woman, it may be said that it is not al- 
ways true that women are at the bottom of crimes committed and 
that they figure very strongly as urging on murder. Men have 
murdered for love of women but very often the loved woman had 
no idea the demented male was going to run amok among his kind 
and kill. Of course, women have participated in crimes and in some 
cases have urged that crimes be committed but it is unsafe to adopt 
a general rule and say that in any crime you should begin a search 
for the woman who surely must be the hidden motive for the com- 
mission of the crime. 

The woman against whom suspicion has been directed in the case 
under discussion is the sister of the late Mrs. Wilkens. She has 
come forward and frankly told her story, the story of the life lead 
by Wilkens with his wife, of the delusions of Mrs. Wilkens, of their 
drinking habits, the man and the woman, and of the accusations 
Mrs. Wilkens hurled at Wilkens at various times and of his far 
from angelic disposition. It is said that he had at times beaten his 
wife and at the same time it is said that his wife after making ac- 
cusations would recant these and accuse herself of having been 
unfair. And then would come periods of quiet and of perfect un- 
derstanding between the two. 

Hunting the woman has not been a very successful quest so far 
for the astute detectives of the police department. Finding the sis- 
ter-in-law did not produce enough evidence on investigation to hold 
her as an accomplice, the police and the district attorney have 
found another woman. It is announced they are hot on her trail 
and that she may yield a better grist of evidence on which to hold 
her, either as a material witness or an accomplice in the trial of 
Wilkens. 

The Wilkens case presents much that is mysterious and it is a 
very difficult thing to make up your mind as to the guilt or inno- 
cence of Wilkens. The lack of a motive for the killing is puzzling 
those who have the prosecution of the case and the evidence at 
hand is not so absolutely strong as to make it possible to convict 
the accused. Just about as much has been uncovered which would 
point to his innocence as would indicate his guilt. The statements 
made by him as not knowing Castor, his failure to identify him 
when he was placed before him at police headquarters and his 
stubborn adherence to the story that it was a Dodge car which 
pressed him to the curb before the hold-up men shot his wife, are 
all items against him. The evidence of one Castor is against him 
and by implication points to him as the guilty man. It remains to 
be seen whether the prosecution has anything up its sleeve which 
it will produce at the trial to clinch the case against Wilkens. It 
may be the prosecution has in its possession just such evidence, but 
if it has and has not cried it out aloud over the house tops it is 
certainly a seven day wonder. Wilkens, on the other hand, has a 
great deal which may be advanced against the charge that he killed 
his wife, and in addition he has the advantage of having secured 



[Mgjjjjtjig'gggggg »-g">rM''«.g x'nv Ki!gaaigr;f'a1si' : iffai[g|lg51IBi5i^HaWiglBl!ai.' tl 

a very clever lawyer. The struggle to convict Wilkens will be looked 
upon with a great deal of interest by the public. If he is guilty 
it is to be hoped that this guilt will be shown beyond a shadow 
of a doubt as being so. 

In the meanwhile the sleuths and the lawyers are poking and 
peeking and peering around looking for the woman. Are they going 
to find her? 



— The rail magnates are preparing for a contest to a finish with 
the unions now out on strike. It is time something like that hap- 
pened. The successful hold-up by the brotherhoods during the war 
has emboldened the union leaders into thinking they can get any- 
thing they want by asking for it and striking if they do not get it. 



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August 19, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




mm 

0* <t4lnl/fj, r lit d^J.m rH^, 

— And again the appalling list of accidents in automobiling over 
the Sunday holiday. If every driver would take this matter seriously 
to heart this list might be very materially lessened. Almost every 
accident is an avoidable one and a little care here and a little pre- 
caution there might save two or three lives and several cripplings. 
Why not remember that if you are careful and the other fellow is 
careful, too, there will be fewer chances for deplorable smash-ups. 
You never know what the other fellow is going to do. You know 
what you are going to do yourself and if you all remember that 
part of it you need not worry about the other fellow, because 
there ain't goin' to be no other fellow! 

— There has been bombing at Roseville, and on the Santa Fe, and 
the Western Pacific. There is a substitute for "peaceful picketing" 
of former days. A train was bombed and ten persons injured in 
New Jersey; a roundhouse was destroyed at Portland, Ore.; a bridge 
was dynamited at Wichita ; another dynamiting of a bridge oc- 
curred at Ash Grove, Mo. No, this is not a tabulation of what the 
gentle striker, or his friends, is doing these days; it is a record of a 
few hours only. It begins to look as if the "direct action reds" 
were in complete charge. And the heads of the unions have adopted 
the Lenin tactics of denying that any union men are involved and 
of advising against "harsh methods." 

— It is to be supposed the losses inflicted on all kinds of shippers 
of perishable commodities, especially fruits and vegetables, are of 
no concern whatever to the striking railroaders, providing they can 
make that loss big enough to force the railroad managements to 
give in to the strikers, in every direction. This is simply an illus- 
tration of the utter selfishness of an organized body of workers who 
do not care how much harm they visit on the rest of the community 
in their quest for an advantage over their employer. 

— The newspapers say that the long skirt has come to stay for 
a while — a long time some of them say. Well, if that is so, I do 
not care to say anything complimentary to the women or their in- 
telligence. The long skirt is a disseminator of disease, picked up 
through trailing in or too near dirt. The long skirt is a constant 
impediment to freedom of action, it is unsightly, and it deprives 
me of the compensation due of seeing well formed legs when I 
have been disappointed by the sight of a face I would preferably 
forget. Well formed legs are a joy to us all and there isn't any 
use trying to deny this fact. A bas the long skirts altogether! 

— A rose by any other name would smell as sweetly and the idea 
that Germany is no longer an empire makes no difference over there 
or here. The German foreign office in sending out its embassadors 
sends them out as representing the German Empire and the presi- 
dent of Germany is designated as president of the German Empire. 
All of which is very queer there being no emperor to this empire. 
President Harding made it very plain that the credentials were 
accepted from the German Republic but all official Germany still 
speaks of that nation as an empire. How come? 

— Why want to look like Lincoln? Why not look like yourself? 
What is the matter with yourself, anyway? And besides, Abraham 
Lincoln isn't here to defend himself. How is your record, Mr. Poli- 
tician, that you should want to set up a Lincoln camouflage to 
hide it? What about it, anyhow, Hiram? 



— A woman and her money were parted and now the woman 
mourns her money and not her husband. Mrs. Pearl Moore is the 
woman and the Moore in the case is supposed to be named John 
Moore and is said to be a "well known business man of New York 
and San Francisco." The abandoned wife makes the charge that he 
got away after two days of married life with jewelry valued at 
$1000 and left behind him wrecked affections. Boy, page Mr. John 
Moore, business man. 

— Last week the San Francisco News Letter asked if the arrival 
in an airplane of a fire chief at San Francisco was simply a foretaste 
of fighting fires from the air. This week one of the fire chiefs an- 
nounces that fire fighting in a sky scraper via use of planes was 
only a question of development which would take place very shortly. 
We live in an age of wonders. 



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1«5!> Mason St. S:in Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Franklin 6912 

Subscription Price $6.00 Tor Year 




8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 19, 1922 



v — Heard It? I 





Two negroes of a decidedly black variety met in the streets of New 
York after many years of absence. The one was indigent and ragged, 
and his exchequer would as soon buy him the Woolworth Building as 
it could buy a "follow" plate of "ham-and." But his colored brother 
had done well. He was "some" success. His clothes were of the 
gaudiest, and jewels sparkled about him, scintillating through the 
smoke of i big, banded cigar from which he puffed swiftly pursuing 
aromatic clouds. But he remembered his old friend of boyhood and 
said: "Why, kid, wharrer you gone an' done? Are you jest done gone 
broke? Cos' say, if heff-a-dollar's any good to you, lemme know. 
The indigent one said he hadn't the price of a sandwich. The Croesus, 
dipping his fist into a pocketful of money, pulled out a handful which 
contained every kind of coin except a half-dollar. Finally, he pro- 
duced a dollar piece and, flauntingly passing it to the penurious one, 
said: "See, niggah. Ah ain't got no heff-dollar. But you c'n have this 
'ere 'ole dollar, an' never mind no change." Grabbing his food and 
lodging, the other said: "Whay! you great big chief. Yo' th' only 
niggah Ah knows as c'n be called a reg'lar white man. An' yo' are." 



Australia and California 



The colonel of a Scotch regiment who was disliked by his men 
wanted to locate a sniper. He called for Sandy, the crack shot of 
the regiment, and said: "Sandy, there's a sniper over there. He's 
been shootin' at us all day. The fir-r-st time he knocked the hat off 
me and the second time he knocked the cigarette ott of ma mouth. 
Go over and get him. I think he's in yon clump of bushes." 

Sandy went toward the spot and found a German hidden in a 
small tree. Sandy shook the tree and down fell the German, who 
threw up his hands and cried, "Kamarad, Mercy!" 

Sandy looked at him disgustedly and said: "Mer-r-cy? Ye'll 
get nae mer-r-cy from me! Ye missed the colonel twice!" 



Three Fours Are Twelve. — It was Sunday morning and Mr. Newly- 
wed insisted on going downstairs and preparing breakfast. 

Half an hour later the little bride descended to the dining-room, 
and there found breakfast, hot and steaming, waiting for her. One 
gentle, graceful movement with a knife severed the shell of an egg 
and laid bare its contents. Mrs. Newlywed paused, and — 

"My dear John," she gasped, "what have you done to these eggs?" 

"Boiled them, of course!" retorted John. 

"Yes; but for how long?" 

'My dear girl, I carried out your instructions to the letter." 

"Nonsense! These eggs are as hard as bricks!" 

"Well, I only boiled them for twelve minutes." 

"Twelve minutes!" exclaimed Mrs. Newlywed. "But I told you that 
three minutes was long enough for an egg." 

"I'm quite aware of that," retorted her husband, proudly. "Accord- 
ingly, I allowed twelve minutes for four eggs." 



Only Oue Ship. — An American doughboy, captive to a Boche of- 
ficer, was questioned: 

"How many of you American soldiers are there on this side of the 
Atlantic?" queried the German. 

"Oh! About three million of us." 

"It must have taken a lot of ships we knew nothing about to bring 
all of you over, didn't it?" 

"Oh, no; only one ship brought us over!" 

"Only one! Impossible! And what one was that?" 

"The Lusitania." 



WE ARE told by one Capt. Roy Moyes, Australian born, and 
ex-shipmaster, world traveler and lecturer, that Australia, 
with the aid of English interests, will expend something like five 
hundred million dollars in the effort to find population for the un- 
developed lands of the great Australian commonwealth. 

This money is being made available and is being spent in ac- 
quainting the world at large with the advantages Australia offers 
to the settler, the kinds of opportunities for exploitation and the 
vast acreage now untenanted by white men. It is one of the greatest 
efforts ever put forward by a nation to "sell" itself to new blood 
and new energy. 

Australia, in its various provinces, has to a greater or less ex- 
tent, exploited the many isms offered by all kinds of people as 
cure-alls for the ills that bedevil government. She has been the 
prey of the laborite and near socialist and she has partially in 
some instances recovered from these attacks and in other instances 
has entirely recovered and is now firmly forging ahead along the 
road of reason and common sense. From her experiments with the 
cure-alls offered by the labor elements she has derived a certain 
amount of good laws and a number of laws that were bad, but in 
her recovery it may be safely assumed she will not retain the bad 
laws but will retain the good. 

And Australia's efforts at peopling her vast domain with those 
who will benefit themselves while benefiting the country through 
its development will certainly be a success. She is calling to over- 
peopled England and she is calling to other countries to change the 
flow of migration from these countries to Australia. 

California is, in a measure, in the same position as Australia 
and her efforts to advertise her productiveness of soil, the astound- 
ingly rich output of her mines in minerals and in oils, her growth 
in the industrial lines, and her foreign trade are sure to bring re- 
sults. California is just now telling the world what she offers to 
those who would migrate from cold and barren lands to her offers 
of plenty. California wants the world to know of the unpeopled 
prairie, mountain and timbered lands to be found within the vast 
empire that is called a state. California wants new citizens and 
she wants workers, she wants the captains of industry, she wants 
the farmer and the miner and she wants all of those who would 
migrate to better their conditions. And there is no place on earth 
where lie awaiting man and man's energy and initiative in develop- 
ing them so many potential possibilities for producing wealth. 

As far as the United States is concerned, California is the future 
center of all things and San Francisco is its financial and indus- 
trial heart, the mart for its raw products, its greatest rail and ocean 
traffic point now or for the future. 

We are face to face with a new future. With peace coming to 
the world will come prosperity and the hun cf industry will be 
heard in the land. The fields will yield of their crops and the mines 
of their wealth to the end that the newcomer and the older resident 
may bless the day they came to dwell under our sunny skies, amid 
our flowers. 

All success is wished to Australia in her efforts to people the 
country. It is well for those who seek beUer conditions and who 
wish to make a change that California extends the greetings of a 
true and fostering hospitality. There is room for all and so let 
them come. 



— There are toads in India that eagerly swallow bits of red-hot 
charcoal with no apparent discomfort. 



— In view of the rapid increase in crime is it possible that the 
publication of such stories as that of the life of Landru has an evil 
effect on the people's minds? There has enough of that kind of 
stuff found its way into the Sunday Supp to corrupt more than 
three hundred and fifty thousand criminals. That number is said 
to be our modest quota. 



August 19, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



Points for Property Owners 



SOME enterprising people, gifted with energetic initiative, stole 
a march on the taxpayers of various districts forming a small 
nearby town, and although the result was arrived at in open meet- 
ings, concrete roads were being built, before those who would have 
to pay for them wakened to the fact. 

These roads covered many miles. They were put down at a time 
when that kind of work was considered almost so high priced as to 
be prohibitive. But they were put down, and there were more of 
the same kind built, when a violent storm of protest came from 
the property owners in the various districts in opposition. And, 
after a hectic period, the road building program was abandoned, 
for one year. 

The fever heat of argumentation is past and the people in the 
districts with improved roads are preparing to meet the first install- 
ment of their assessment. What has been the effect of this pav- 
ing on the districts and on the town itself? 

It might have been any town, large or small, and it is doubtful 
if the effect would have been any different. If we are to judge by 
the outward and visible signs we find new fences and old ones that 
are newly painted; we find houses painted and repaired, which had 
not been repaired in years; we find lawns, where none existed be- 
fore; we find a general air of prosperity where before the appear- 
ance had been down-at-the-heel. And we are told that there is 
not a single vacant house in these districts that is worth living in 
and also that rents have gone up from 10 to 15 per cent. The price 
of property, too, has advanced. 

What was threatened as a result of the assessment for those new 
streets? One of the favorite expressions was that property would 
have to be confiscated to pay for the assessment and that this 
confiscation would be brought about through liens brought against 
the property by the contractors for the street improvement, and that 
these liens would in effect be considered as taking Drecedence over 
any mortgages which might be in force against the property in de- 
linquency. The stories went the rounds that more than half of the 
property affected would be given up to the contractors, and that 
the city, through general taxation, would have to buy these prop- 
erties in. The roads were built on the district plan and the rest 
of the town had no part in bearing the expense, unless a district 
proved delinquent. 

That was the situation several months ago. !o date there has 
been no apparent move on the part of anyone to give up property 
and the assessment, as far as can be seen, is not in any district acting 
as a wholesale confiscator of property. 

The whole town is being benefited right along, through the im- 
provements which have been made, and property ha> increased in 
value. The population of the town has increased, rents have in- 
creased and other improvements have been made to keep pace with 
the improved and beautiful condition of the streets. 

This particular case is an object lesson for property owners tc 
bear in mind. It is not always the wisest course to pursue to stand 
in the way of public improvements. In many instances it is far 
wiser for the property owner to stand the burden of taxation with 
a view of adding to the value of his holdings and helping the tow-i 
itself in a gene>al way. 



— Is it possible the automobile accidents are going to be allowed 
to increase at the present frightful rate? Some means should be 
adopted by the authorities of the city and the adjacent counties to 
stop the sacrifice of life on the altar of speed. Friday to Monday 
has earned a very tragic history for itself as a period of wild driving 
and dreadful tragedies. And we can minimize this to a great extent. 
Now, why not do it? 



THE PURCHASE OF THE MARKET STREET SYSTEM 

The San Francisco News Letter has repeatedly announced that 
the negotiations looking forward to the purchase by the city of the 
Market Street Railway would be re-opened, and this is now an as- 
sured thing, through the unanimously adopted resolution, put for- 
ward by Supervisor McGregor, that a new committee, as to purchase, 
be appointed and the old committee discharged. 

The difficulty seems to have been to arrive at what is really a 
fair valuation of the properties that are to be bought and various 
people have made suggestions so widely divergent as to seem, in 
many instances, mere guess-work to arrive at results. The first com- 
mittee failed to agree on this subject and members submitted prices 
ranging from seventeen million to thirty-five million dollars. City 
engineer O'Shaughnessy's price was fixed at $40,000,000 and the 
company asked $50,000,000, while the Railroad Commission figure 
was placed at $45,000,000. It would seem it should not be so 
very difficult a task to arrive at just what the system is worth. 

The way has been cleared by the supervisors to arrive at a price 
and to make possible the purchase of the lines being operated by 
the Market Street Railway Company in San Mateo County. 

Considering that the summer months are a very poor criterion 
upon which to base any kind of an idea of street railway earnings, 
the showing made by the Market Street Railway Company is a very 
good one. Its earnings statement for July shows that it had a net 
income of $110,404, before providing for Federal income taxes, 
sinking funds or betterments. July is a vacation month and is there- 
fore seldom a banner month for the local street railway system. 

Now that the supervisors are apparently unanimous in the idea 
of the purchase it seems that any further delay should not be ex- 
pected. It is significant that those speaking at the meeting on Tues- 
day represented all kinds and shades of opinions. This can be judged 
best by scanning the following names: P. H. McCarthy, Dr. John 
Galwey, George Skaller, Mrs. D. E. F. Easton, Mrs. William B. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Anne Godfrey, Edgar Peixotto, representing the 
Down Town Association, and Col. T. P. Robinson, representing 
the Park-Presidio Improvement Association. 



THE MACHINE IN STATE POLITICS 

With some people it is the fashion to talk quite glibly of "the 
machine in politics," and to make the statement the machine will 
elect Mr. Johnson for the Senate. As far as the machine is con- 
cerned it may be said that its day is over. There is no such thing 
in this state and Mr. Johnson must find his strength just where his 
opponent, Mr. Moore, will find it — in the confidence the people 
have in his integrity and capacity to serve them in the national 
legislature. The Johnson strength is certainly not nearly as great 
as it was in former times and this is being shown in many ways. We 
have made comment on this fact before. As far as Mr. Moore is 
concerned he has brought an unusual strength to his candidacy and 
his repute for putting things over is helping him a great deal with 
the people. Mr. Moore is known as a reputable and successful busi- 
ness man, a man who achieves and his public works speak for him 
in a very convincing way. He is not attached to any particular 
private interests and he holds the confidence of the masses. As 
the campaign goes on his strength seems to be getting more evi- 
dent every day. It will be Senator Moore after election day if 
public expression before election means anything at all. 



A five-year-old girl was given a teddy-bear with eyes sewed on 
so crookedly that the bear looked cross-eyed. The next Sunday, 
when she came home from Sunday school, she was heard to call 
her bear "Gladly." 

"What a queer name! Where did you ever get it?" she was 
asked. 

"Why, this morning in Sunday school we sang "Gladly a Cross 
Td Bear." 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 19, 1922 



Press Agenting Any Old Thing 



THE press agent is a great American institution and from the 
humblest citizen to the government itself is made use of in 
one way or another to make truths public or to create an effective 
propaganda for this, that or the other without regard as to facts 
or no facts. The press agent is a very effective piece of the ma- 
chinery of life in this great republic. He moulds public opinion in 
a great measure and his work is to be found in every hamlet, town, 
or city in the land. He reaches the inner consciousness of the far- 
mer, the prejudices of the worker, the pride and pocket of the capi- 
talist through all kinds of uses of the printed word. 

Some newspapers lend themselves very easily to being press 
agented. They like it because it saves time and the average editor 
is a run-down-at-the-heels lazy cuss. The average editor must in 
this case mean some one other than the editor of the large news- 
paper in the populous center. The average editor means the rank 
and file, the thousand and one small fry from the country districts, 
clever fellows who have been overlooked when Hearst, or Bennet, 
or Munsey was around mousing for geniuses. 

This average editor is a power in the land because in the aggre- 
gate what he says and what he writes really does reach a much 
greater constituency than that reached by those hired geniuses 
who draw their salaries from men like Hearst or the others. His 
sanctums, they are always sanctums, they become editorial rooms 
when the town becomes a city — his sanctum therefore is not much 
to look at. It is stuffy and nasty. It smells of stale tobacco, either 
pipes or cigarettes. The average editor doesn't strike the happy 
medium by smoking a good cigar, except around election time. 

He is a bright fellow and he is looking for the best there is in 
life with the least effort on his part. And right here is the great 
weakness which gives the press agent his strength. Along comes the 
mail. In the mail is found this or that item. It is short. No sensible 
press agent ever sends a country editor a long story. The long story 
road is that to the wastebasket or the stove. It is because it is 
short it appeals to the editor. He squints at it and it sounds good 
to him. It will just about fill the space between two ads. So he 
shoots it into the space and it fits perfectly. Ten to one it is not 
as innocent as it looks and is a part of big mosaic the press agent 
has laid out to instruct or fool the public. At other times the press 
agent may be bolder because the editor is under obligations to the 
company being press agented for an advertisement running the 
whole year through. Unless the editor is a cantankerous individual 
the item goes in usually without being read. And that item may 
be part of some big campaign which may or may not be of benefit 
to the people served by the editor. 

The big newspapers lend themselves to the same kind of press 
agenting and when they do it it is because the thing has been thor- 
oughly canvassed and the editor is thus warranted in giving publi- 
cation to the press agent stuff. Some of this material is vastly in- 
teresting and at times the very best writers on special subjects are 
employed by bureaus in the press agenting business. 

What of the people? The people never know when they are being 
press agented. Sometimes they think they are when they are not, 
and at other times the press agenting fitting in with their own ideas 
they become strenuous advocates of the press agent's publicity. 

Press agentry is the delicate art of creating opinions — opinions 
in politics, about soaps, foods or complexion powders, about re- 
ligion, about music, about automobiles, movie stars, real actors and 
actresses and many other things. Press agentry is the art of using 
the newspaper's columns without giving the publishers any pay for 
the use of them — a sort of polite thievery by experts in the calling. 
It is a wonderful art and it has done wonders in this country in 
changing public opinion, sometimes for the good of the people and 
sometimes decidedly to their loss. 



CHARLES C. MOORE 




for 

UNITED STATES 
SENATOR 

REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE 

Primary Election August 20th 



CHARLES C. MOORE. Republican 
candidate for the United States 
Senate at the primary election Au- 
gust 29th, is one of California's fore- 
most citizens and is best known as the 
president and builder of the Panama- 
Pacific International Exposition in 1915. 

In addition to his engineering busi- 
ness, which is extensive, Mr. Moore has 
many other varied industries through- 
out the State. He is the owner of the 
largest olive groves in the world, at 
Sylmar, near Los Angeles, and has other 
agricultural interests. He is a stock 
raiser and farmer, as well as engineer, 
and is ideally fitted by experience to 
act intelligently and effectively on the 
many problems of interest to Califor- 
nians and the different sections of the 
State. Mr. Moore has a record of over 
twenty-eight years as a business man 
without ever having had any serious 
difficulty with labor and in labor circles 
it is pointed out that the exposition that 
he built was the one exposition in his- 
tory which was built without a single 
labor disturbance. 

With the beginning of the war, 
Charles C. Moore issued a standing or- 
der that all employes of his concern 
who went into war service should have 
paid to them the difference between 
their service pay and the salary paid 
to them by his company. This rule was 
effective during the entire war period. 
In his platform, Mr. Moore says: 

"Being personally engaged in the pro- 
duction of California's agricultural and 
horticultural products, I realize that the 
future prosperity and growth of our 
State depends most largely upon these 
industries, and therefore I favor a tariff 
which will give them full and ample 
protection. 

"I favor legislation to aid and en- 
courage the development of the mineral 
resources of the West, and for the pro- 
motion of the great irrigation projects 
for the reclaiming of our arid lands. 

"I believe in a businesslike and eco- 
nomical administration of Government, 
and in a reduction of the taxes that are 
now burdening and crushing our indus- 
tries. The country needs more attention 
to its business in Congress, and less ora- 
tory; more application of business prin- 
ciples to measures pending and less de- 
votion to making stump speeches for 
political purposes." 

Northern California Headquarters of 

diaries C. Moore for United States 

Senator, 

214 Crocker Building, San Francisco 



August 19, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



11 



AT PRESENT PRESIDING JUSTICE 

Judge A. T. Barnett wants to be re-elected 
as justice of the peace and he cannot get 
around to see his friends, so his friends are 
doing all they can to foster his re-election 
to office. It seems that some time ago the 
justice sprained his ankle, while walking 
down stairs in the new city hall. It was an 
unfortunate accident in one way, but in an- 
other it was fortunate for it brought the 
friends of the judge to the front to make 
his campaign for him. It is expected that he 
will receive a large majority in the primaries 
but the friends who are working for him 
expect you to join in making this majority as 
large as it is possible to make it. 

Judge Barnett is deeply versed in the law 
and has many endearing qualities besides 
the possession of this legal lore. He has 
broadened his mind by the study of science 
and literature, in both of which he excels. 
His candidacy has been endorsed by the Civic 
League of Improvement Clubs and Republi- 
can County Committee. 



ANOTHER FINE APPOINTMENT 

Following closely upon the news that A. 
C. Parsons had been appointed as manager 
of the San Francisco branch agency of the 
Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company, now 
comes the announcement that Paul C. Jones, 
well known for several years past as city 
sales manager of the Portland Santa Cruz 
Cement Company, is appointed manager 
of the business department of the San 
Francisco office of the Pacific Mutual In- 
surance Company. This is certainly going 
along the lines of strengthening the battle 
front in every possible way. Business men 
of San Francisco are well acquainted with 
Mr. Jones and many will remember him as 
the son of Clinton Jones, who has long been 
well and favorably known in financial and 
business circles of the big city. 



AN UPRIGHT JUDGE 

The system by which we select the judi- 
ciary has been adversely criticized by people 
from other countries, who claim that judges 
should be elected by a jury of their peers and 
that they should be named for life and be re- 
movable only through impeachment pro- 
ceedings brought before a jury of their peers. 
That is practically what is done in France 
and in other countries. We can not agree 
that we have made many mistakes in the 
selection of judges through the elective sys- 
tem. The system may not be the most per- 
fect in the world but, under it, judges have 
very often proven themselves worthy in every 
way of public confidence and have earned the 
right to ask to be returned to office. Judge 
James M. Troutt is an example of that kind 
of judge. He is known for his great ability 
and he has proven himself, while serving the 
people. He should be re-elected. It is hoped 
our readers will not forget that when they are 
marking their ballots. 



Spoof: Hey. what's the idea watching the 
library steps all day? 

Goof: Oh, merely a matter of form.— Ore- 
gon Lemon Punch. 



The head of a large business house after the first few days, the business man 

bought a number of "Do It Now" signs and counted up the results he found that the 

hung them up around his offices. They were cashier had bolted with $5000, the head 

effective beyond expectation, and yet it can bookkeeper had eloped with the typist, and 

scarcely be said they worked well. When three clerks had asked for a raise in salary. 



TWICE 
1 2th and Market, 4 Days Starting DAILY 



Thurs. Aug. 24 



2 P.M. 
CrftP.M. 



L> 



circus \ 



BUFFALO BILLS 
^ILDWEST SHOW 



STAGES STARS 

AND THE GREATEST 

CLOWN RIDERoNEARTH 



5 RINGS 



IL^^^ 



Ill 



ES HANNEFORI 

[WITH THE FAMOUS HANNEFORD FAMILY 



«L 



Downtown Ticket Office Show Days 
at The Owl Drug Store, Phelan Bldg. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




ociot 




Busy Cupid 

FORMAL announcement has been made 
of the engagement of Miss Georgia 
Creed, daughter of Mrs. William H. Creed 
of Oakland, to Mr. Addison Posey of Pied- 
mont. The wedding will be celebrated Au- 
gust 22 and will be witnessed only by mem- 
bers of the immediate families. Miss Creed 
.is a sister of Mr. Wiggington Creed of Pied- 
mont and of Mr. William Henry Creed. After 
their wedding tour, Mr. Posey will bring his 
bride to Piedmont, where an attractive home 
awaits them. 

— Miss Ruth Rogers, daughter of Judge 
and Mrs. Merrill Rogers of Ventura, was 
married to Remi Chabot Knight, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert S. Knight, on August 10, 
the ceremony being solemnized at the Church 
of St. Monica on Geary street and Twenty- 
third avenue. Mr. and Mrs. George Mount- 
ford entertained the bridal party and guests 
at a reception and wedding supper at their 
home after the church service. The newly- 
weds left for the Canadian Northwest on 
their honeymoon. The marriage unites two 
families prominent in their communities in 
this state. The bridegroom is a nephew of 
Samuel Knight of Burlingame, of Mrs. James 
H. P. Dunn and Leon Bocqueraz. 
Luncheons 

—Mrs. Philip T. Prather and Miss Mary 
Bates entertained at luncheon at the Wo- 
man's Athletic Club on Saturday afternoon 
of last week in honor of Mrs. Lawrence Clay 
Brown, wife of Colonel Brown, U. S. A. 
Colonel and Mrs. Brown took their departure 
Monday for Fort Leavenworth, Kas., where 
they are to be stationed. They are making 
the trip by motor. 

—Mr. and Mrs. John L. McNab enter- 
tained a group of visitors here for the Amer- 
ican Bar Association last week. The party 
motored into the Santa Clara Valley and 




Under the guidance of R. H. Collins 
and his associates, the Peerless was 
bound to be a better and better Peer- 
less. The public response came quick- 
ly and is indicated by augmented sales 
in old Peerless strongholds and 
throughout the country in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St. 

Telephone Prospect 8800 



lunched at the Hotel Vendome at San Jose. 
John W. Davis and Mrs. Davis, Lord Shaw 
and Mrs. Isabel Thompson were in the party. 

— Mrs. Francis B. Loomis gave a hand- 
some luncheon at the Burlingame Country 
Club on Saturday afternoon, having twenty- 
five or thirty friends as her guests. 

—Mrs. Charles S. Whitman of New York 
was the guest of honor at an informal lunch- 
eon at which Mrs. George T. Marye enter- 
tained Monday. The party was held at the 
home of the hostess in Burlingame where 
covers were laid for Mrs. Whiteman, Mrs. 
Charles B. Alexander, Mrs. Lawrence Mc- 
Guire of New York, Mrs. George Cameron, 
Mrs. George Pope, Mrs. Joseph D. Grant, 
Miss Flora Doyle and Mrs. Marye. Mr. and 
Mrs. Whitman left for the South Monday 
evening. 

— Miss Anne Petz entertained formally at 
luncheon at her home in San Rafael Tuesday. 

— As a compliment t o former Califor- 
nians now visiting here, Mr. and Mrs. George 
A. Pope gave a large luncheon party at 
their home in Burlingame Monday, more 
than fifty guests enjoying their hospitality. 
The party had been planned in honor of 
Vice President and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge, 
but the latter's itinerary precluded their re- 
maining over. 

Teas 

— Mrs. Clarence Grange was hostess at 
a Mah Jongg tea at her home near Napa, 
a number of the guests going up from here 
for the week end. Mrs. Grange had a Chi- 
nese, Low Dong, gowned in picturesque Ori- 
ental style, to enlighten her guests in the in- 
tricacies of this most ancient of the Chinese 
pastimes. The party took place in a sum- 
mer house decorated in Chinese style for 
the occasion, Mrs. Grange having a lovely 
collection of Oriental art which she secured 
during a visit in China and India a few 
years ago. 

— Mrs. James Parker Helm, wife of Lieu- 
tenant-Commander Helm, U. S. N., enter- 
tained at tea at the Hotel St. Francis Wed- 
nesday afternoon. 

— Mrs. Mark Gerstle had a small group 
for tea in the garden of the Hotel St. Francis 
on Monday. 

Dinners 

—Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Waterlow Ford 
were dinner hosts Saturday at their home 
in San Mateo, later attending the Grant ball. 

—Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Clark Jr. were 
hosts at a small dinner Saturday night at 
their home in San Mateo. Their guests in- 
cluded Mr. and Mrs. William Gregory Par- 
rott, Mrs. George Gordon Moore and Mr. 
Raymond Armsby. 

— Entertaining the younger element of so- 
ciety from Burlingame and San Francisco, 
Miss Josephine Grant was hostess at a din- 
ner Saturday evening at the San Mateo 



Country Club. Thirty guests accepted her 
hospitality at this affair, and later the group 
was joined by the younger married contingent 
to the number of two score. 

— A farewell party was given Tuesday 
evening in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Cheever 
Cowdin of New York, who returned Wednes- 
day to the Atlantic Coast. They have been 
six weeks in California and first visited the 
Lake Tahoe country and more recently in 
Menlo Park. A part of his holiday was en- 
joyed by Mr. Cowdin at the Bohemian Grove. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Lowery, with whom 
Mr. and Mrs. Cowdin have been visiting for 
the last ten days, were their hosts Tuesday. 
The dinner was held at the Lowery country 
place at Menlo Park. 

— General and Mrs. Hunter Liggett were 
hosts at a dinner party on Thursday in 
honor of General and Mrs. Charles Gould 
Morion. The Mortons returned recently from 
Alaska and are at Fort Mason. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker 
were hosts at a handsome dinner at their 
country place at Hillsborough on Saturday 
evening. Their party was given in compli- 
ment to Mr. and Mrs. Cheever Cowdin, who 
are in California on a visit. The others pres- 
ent were the Messrs. and Mesdames Walter S. 
Martin, Stewart Lowery, Eugene Murphy, 
Mrs. Fentriss Hill, Walter G. Filer, Malcolm 
Whitman; Messrs. Frederick Mills, Gerney 
Newland, Stanford Gwin. The party motored 
over to the Grants for dancing and supper 
later in the evening. 

Dances 

— Mrs. William Bowers Bourn entertained 
the sub-debutantes of the peninsula cities 
at a dance Saturday evening, the affair hav- 
ing been held at "Filoli" in San Mateo. 

— Three of the girls who made their debuts 
in 1921 will be hostesses at a dance in honor 
of last season's debutantes, the affair taking 
place on August 26 at the Menlo Park Coun- 
try Club. The hostesses are the Misses Aileen 
Mcintosh, Alice Requa and Mary Julia 
Crocker. 

Bridge 

— Capt. George Landenberger, U. S. N., 
and Mrs. Landenberger were hosts at a de- 
lightful bridge party and supper at their 
headquarters at the naval training station 
at Yerba Buena island Monday evening. 



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MAKER IN ATTENDANCE 



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August 19, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



In Town and Out 

— Miss Bixby arrived in San Francisco 
on Saturday and is a house guest of the 
Silas Palmers at Stanford Court, where she 
is visiting Miss Palmer's niece, Miss Ida- 
belle Wheaton, for the week. On Friday she 
went to Piedmont, where she was entertained 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Walker 
by Miss Harriet Walker, who is a classmate 
of Miss Bixby at Vassar College. 

— Mrs. Edward Erie Brownell and her 
daughters, the Misses Sophia and Harriett 
Brownell, have gone to Goleta to be the 
guests of Mrs. James Hall Bishop and Miss 
Isabelle Bishop at "Corona del Mar," the 
Bishop Rancho. 

— Mrs. George Harding of New York has 
gone to the Feather River Inn, where she 
will visit for a fortnight with Mrs. Robert 
Oxnard. 

— George Gordon Moore has returned 
from New York, where he has been for the 
past four weeks, and he is with Mrs. Moore 
at their home in San Mateo. 

— Mrs. Thomas Breeze of San Mateo, her 
sons, Thomas Breeze Jr. and Dick Breeze, 
and her niece. Miss Frances Pringle, have 
gone to Ye Castle Inn. 

— Mrs. Louis Parrott has returned to San 
Francisco after an absence of nine months, 
during which time she has made a trip 
around the world. She returned by way of 
Peking, where she visited her son-in-law and 
daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Lennox Simp- 
son. 

— J. J- Tynan and his daughters, Miss 
Margot and Miss Josephine Tynan, motored 
to Tahoe and passed the week end at Talla- 
cem, returning to town on Sunday evening. 
Miss Tynan is contemplating a trip South 
this month. 

Intimations 

Mr. and Mrs. Moseley Taylor are com- 
ing here from their home in Boston some 
time next month to visit the latter's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Pope. 

Mrs. Henry T. Scott, who has been very 

ill for months, is convalescing after being 
in a hospital in town. She is now at her home 
in Burlingame. Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Scott 
passed the week end at the Henry T. Scott 
home. 

—Mr and Mrs. Webster Jones are visit- 
ing in Chicago. They will sail from New 
York for Brazil in a week or so, to be away 
for about three months. 

Mrs. Edgar Preston and her grand- 
daughters, the Misses Josephine Drown and 
Frances Ames, are visiting friends in Bel- 
gium. They plan to sail on about September 
26. The girls will have a coming-out ball 
on about November I at the Burlingame 
Country Club. 

— Mrs. Jerome Landheld is home after a 
long absence. She visited her sister Lady 
Edgerton, in London, and recently she has 



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been with Mr. Landfield in New York, where 
his business is detaining him. Mrs. Land- 
field is established for the winter at her home 
in Burlingame. 

Colonel Osmun Latrobe and his son, 
Osmun Jr., will make a motor tour to Fort 
Houston, Tex., leaving here within a few 
weeks. Colonel Latrobe has been assigned 
to duty in Texas, following over two years 
at the Presidio. Mrs. Latrobe and Miss 
Mary Stuart Latrobe will make the jour- 
ney by train, after a visit at several places 
in this state. The latter, who is an attrac- 
tive sub-debutante, is being farewelled at a 
round of affairs. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand C. Peterson, 
accompanied by their daughter, Mrs. Ward 
Mailliard Jr., leave this week for the North, 
visiting at Portland and Seattle enroute to 
Glacier National Park, to be away a few 
weeks. 

— One of the most interesting visitors to 
San Francisco in many months is Mrs. John 
Fairchild of New York, who has been in this 
city at the Hotel St. Francis. Mrs. Fair- 
child came West with her son, John Fair- 
child Jr., and is returning with him this week, 
making the trip by way of Panama. While 
here the New York visitor has been much 
entertained, but in an informal way. Sunday 
she passed in Burlingame, where she was the 
guest of Francis Carolan and where she also 
had a short visit with Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm 
Whitman at their home. Mrs. Fairchild is 
one of the several social leaders who have 
entered with success upon a professional ca- 
reer. 

— Mrs. Webster Jones of San Rafael, well 
known in San Francisco social circles, is 
making the journey to Brazil with her hus- 
band. Mr. Jones and his wife will remain 
away from San Francisco for the a period 
of three to four months. 

— Addison Mizner is going abroad in Sep- 
tember to remain several months. He has 
been engaged by Paris Singer of London to 
build at Monte Carlo and his time during 
the summer is much taken up with plans 
for this home, which is to combine archi- 
tectural beauty with absolute comfort — on 
the American plan — in a setting of unusual 
charm. Mr. Mizner is particularly happy in 
making the houses he designs the complement 
of nature's setting, especially at Palm Beach, 
where he has built some wonderfully attrac- 
tive homes, among them one for Mr. and 
Mrs. Singer. 

— Mrs. Arthur Rose Vincent and Miss 
Rosemary Vincent have arrived in London, 
where they are visiting with friends and en- 
joying the summer social season. They will 
return here early in the fall. 

At Del Monte 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Harkness of 
New York, accompanied by Dr. Alex T. 
Martin and Dr. H. W. Cave, have arrived 
at Del Monte in a special car. The promi- 
nent party is making a stay at the picturesque 
Del Monte Lodge at Pebble Beach. 

— Colonel and Mrs. Sydney Cloman have 
arrived at the Hotel Del Monte to join the 
large gathering of Burlingame people en- 
joying the summer life there. 



A LUNCHEON DE LUXE 

Amid the quiet of refined and relaxing 
surroundings the business man appreciates 
the value to him of a luncheon at the Fair- 
mont Hotel. It is rarely the case in large 
cities that within five minutes ride of a bust- 
ling, hustling city, with all of the attendant 
noise and turmoil, there is to be found so 
restful a spot as the Fairmont Hotel. The 
establishing of the Fairmont luncheon as a 
feature of the great hostelry's public enter- 
tainment was a fine idea. And the business 
man appreciates this attention to his wants. 



Self confidence 
and initiative 

are both direct results of clear vision. If 
one's vision is impaired confidence and 
power of initiative are naturally impaired 
because of lack of assurance. It is there- 
fore most essential that proper care and 
aid be given the eyes at the very first 
signs of trouble. 

\V. D. Fennimore A. R. Fennimore 

J. W. Davis 



sMam^C 




San Francisco - 181 Post, 2508 Mission StB. 
Berkeley - - - - 2106 Shattuck Avenue 
Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 



ELECTROLYSIS 

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superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest improved multiple needle ma- 
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MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary Street, Suite 723 Whitney Bldg. 

Phone Douglas 5232 
Oakland, Suite 424, First Natl. Bank Bide. 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

Make Your Reservations 
nt City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 0130 
Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

• • • • • • 
PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

• • • • • • 
JEWELS In Platinum 

• • • • • • 
REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

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EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hour*: 2 till 4, and by Appointment 

Pbour Sutler 1718 

REMOVED TO 

Howard Building, 209 Post Street 

Corner Grant Arena*. San Francisco 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 19, 1922 





inNANOAL^ 



By P. N. BERINGER 




THE United States Government has at last 
come to some kind of a working agree- 
ment with Germany regarding reparations; it 
is a little closer to recognition of Mexico, 
through the actions of President Obregon but 
there still seem certain conditions regarding 
Mexico's land laws standing in the way; we 
have recognized three new nations — Estho- 
nia, Latvia and Lithuania. These countries 
occupy the eastern frontage of the Baltic, 
from East Prussia northward to Finland. 
They were the former Russian frontage on 
the Baltic. Esthonia and Lithuania are inde- 
pendent republics and a little after these were 
so established Latvia made a similar pro- 
nouncement. 

Most of the European nations have recog- 
nized the republics and they were admitted to 
the League of Nations in September, a year 
ago. The chief port of Esthonia is Reval and 
this, in turn, the terminus of the rail line from 
Petrograd. The state is a small one and the 
population is about one and three-quarter 
millions, mostly of Finnish origin. The prin- 
cipal exports are timber, meats, potatoes, flax 
and paper. The imports are coal, sugar, salt, 
fertilizers, clothing and miscellaneous mer- 
chandise. The people are largely agricultur- 
ists. 

Latvia is situated to the south of Esthonia 
and the characteristics and employments of 
its people are largely similar to that of the 
Esthonians. The population will round out 
one million and a half in number. The ex- 
ports are timber, meat, potatoes and manu- 
factures of wood. Food, clothing and mis- 
cellaneous manufactures form the imports. 
The chief ports are Riga, Libau and Windau. 
These form the Baltic terminii connecting 
them with Moscow. 

Lithuania lies south of Latvia and has a 
larger population as well as a larger area. 
The population, which is chiefly Lithuanian, 
is of about two million three hundred thou- 
sand in number. There is a very large and 
strong German element in Lithuania. The 
chief exports are rye, wheat, potatoes, eggs, 
butter and timber and the imports are fer- 
tilizers, agricultural machinery and miscel- 
laneous manufactures. Lithuania has only an 
extremely narrow frontage on the Baltic. 

I have thought it best to give a rough idea 

of the new nations and their location because 

so very few people know anything at all 

about them at this time. 

* * * 

We are not yet feeling the effects of the 
strike but those effects will surely be felt later 
on and we may as well accept the arrest of 
the march toward prosperity if not the start 
of a march back to the depths of bad busi- 



ness. Strikes are unnecessary and avoidable. 
They are made necessary as a means of forc- 
ing concessions from the other side and we 
have no laws strong enough and no judges 
with backbone enough to enforce those we 
have either against the labor unions when 
they are running amok or the business man 
when he is doing the same thing. It now re- 
mains to be seen if the Washington authori- 
ties are going to allow themselves to be 
forced into the position of being abettors of 
the union scheme to establish that they may 
give up their rights to work and that, when 
taking them back again, they will automa- 
tically receive the same grade and advantages 
in employment which they possessed when 
they gave up their jobs. To admit the con- 
tention of the unions as to seniority is to es- 
tablish a proprietary right in the job for 
union members and for none other than a 
union member. It is a very interesting situa- 
tion and the present administration seems no 
different from all others, except that its im- 
mediate predecessor did not stop to argue the 
question but gave the Brotherhoods all they 
asked when the hold-up was made. The 
Harding scheme seems to be to try to force a 
surrender by either side by talking these to a 
standstill and by offering various schemes for 
consideration. 

With the large number of trucks readily at 
hand it would seem the growers of perishable 
agricultural foodstuffs might send these to the 
cities and then by agreement among them- 
selves accept a lower price for these products 
in order to save the situation. A very large 
percentage of fruit and other products could 
be used right at home or, on the other hand, 
a great deal could be stored in ice houses and 
refrigerating plants until such time as the rail 
systems are once again in a normal condition. 
The large cities of the State will very readily 
consume by canning and otherwise much of 
the fruit crop usually sent to the East. 

A rail strike such as the one now on, illus- 
trates the folly of a nation being constantly 
at the mercy of unions. This strike, as far as 
it concerns the rail brotherhoods, is a dis- 
grace. In former strikes trains that had 
started out before the strike was called were 
taken to destination where the crew left them. 
This time, with a fiendish meanness, pas- 
senger trains were abandoned any old place 
and the passengers left to find some way out 
of their difficulty. And through malicious 
equivocation the brotherhood chiefs may 
avoid all responsibility and say that no strike 
was ever called by them. The statement is 
made that men left their trains, at Barstow 
and other places, because they were in 
danger of molestation or abuse from guards 
hired to protect the railroad property and the 



lives of free working men who had taken the 
places of the strikers. And, of course, in most 
instances the fact that the brotherhood mem- 
bers were in danger or were abused by 
guards, may very easily be shown to be abso- 
lutely untrue unless the danger may have 
been expected from the strikers' sympathizing 
"friends," who throw bombs and who set 
roundhouses on fire, who derail trains and 
who attack free working men wherever they 
can find them. 

Steps should be taken to provide a set of 
laws making strikes or lockouts criminal acts, 
punishable by long terms of imprisonment. 
Other legislation should be had providing for 
the adjudication of whatever problems might 
arise in industrial or other employment and 
the decision of such a commission or board 
of adjustment should be made binding with 
every ounce of strength the government may 
possess. This board or commission for the 
adjustment of industrial and other disputes 
in relation to employment should be com- 
posed of every element in the community 
so as to render whatever decision may be 
rendered with impartial justice and according 
to the law of the land. A law of this kind 
rightly and rigidly administered would, in 
time, do away completely with the need of 
unions and would eliminate from the lives of 
working men and women the blind tax im- 
posed on them to maintain their unions. And 

this is not a small tax, either. 
* * * 

California needs, more than anything else, 
a State constabulary fashioned after that of 
Pennsylvania and other States. The National 
Guard is just a grinning skeleton with very 
little life left in its bones. It may not be 
moved except after the use of red tape. It 
may not be moved at all, if the incumbent is 
looking for re-election to the governorship. If 
it does move, it is usually a very ineffective 
instrument. And it usually is moved only after 
the tragedy has occurred and murder has been 
done in a wholesale way. We have the sheriff 
and his forces upon whom we may also call 
and indeed must call when the police of the 
village, town or city, has shown its ineffi- 
ciency in the handling of a strike. The aver- 
age sheriff has one eye on re-election and the 
other one is studying some way out of taking 
any kind of responsibility as to the strike 
situation. The sheriff, with a few exceptions, 
of course, is most of the time worse than use- 
less and stands in the way of anything being 
done to curb the striker. We must first ex- 
haust the police power, next the sheriff's, next 
the National Guard, before we can put any 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send Cor Our Market Letter, Just Out 

352 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 



August 19, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



15 



kind of effectual protest against the lawless- 
ness of the rioting striker. If we had a con- 
stabulary, such as is provided in Pennsyl- 
vania and other states, it would be the duty 
of this force to be immediately on hand 
where any kind of trouble in the way of vio- 
lence threatened. Weakness in the adminis- 
tration of the law is a crime breeding prac- 
tice and weakness at times of strike is a 
case of the authorities inviting chaos and red 
rioting, an encouragement to the law breaker 
to go just as far as his blood lust will carry 
him. Let us have a state constabulary. 

* * * 

The Silver Pick lease has struck another 
body of ore which will ensure continual ship- 
ments to the Belmont mill. The raise from 
the fourth level is opening up a ledge three 
to four feet wide with values running $25 
to $30 a ton. Now that the position of the 
ore is so well defined the management is go- 
ing after it to discover its downward trend. 
In the intermediate between the third and 
fourth levels going south it is all in ore of 
good grade. The superintendent is reported 
as saying that he expects, any day, to get 
into another rich chute. The drift, going 
north, is all in ore and looks very fair for 
another lense of high grade. 

Stoping in the intermediate and going north 
has very good showing, too. A shipment was 
made last Friday, and it is expected this will 
go about $30. It is the opinion of the super- 
intendent and of others familiar with condi- 
tions around Goldfield that going north will 
be the best ground as they have at least 
1000 feet of drift before reaching the end 
line. 

Silver Pick certainly has a big chance of 
getting several lenses before they have fully 
explored their ground. 

There has been quite a rise in Goldfield 
Development stock. This has been selling as 
high as 25 cents. A report is out that a 
powerful pool in the East will market the 
Treasury stock in order to erect reduction 
works, to work the large amount of ten dol- 
lar ore developed by the company. This 
property is located at Railroad Springs, about 
twenty-five miles from Goldfield. 

No new developments have been reported 
from Tonopah Divide. It is thought likely the 
vein has flattened out and that they will 
have to drift much farther in order to get 
the downward continuation they are now 
working on the 800 foot level. There seems 
to have developed a more confident feeling 
in Divide shares. A number of shares of 
the smaller companies are showing activity 
during the last ten days. In conjunction with 
some of the companies, which have made 
quite an advance, it now looks as if there 
would soon be quite a market in Tonopah 

Divide shares. 

* * * 

Tonopah Extension has made a wonderful 
development at the 1880 level. This is the 
first time, since Comstock days, that any Ne- 
vada gold or silver mine has found ore of 
commercial value at such a depth and every- 



thing points to the opening up of what is 
known as the Western Part. They are now 
installing a very powerful pumping system 
in what is known as the McCane shaft in the 
Tonopah Extension. The expectation is that 
the pumps will start to unwater the shafts in 
about 30 days. 



AS TO COURTS 

The voter may not exhibit too much care 
in selecting whom to vote for for judgeships. 
Those that have given proof of ability should 
be the ones to be rewarded with the gift 
at the hands of the people of a continuance 
in office. That is the case as far as Judge 
George H. Cabaniss is concerned. Probably 
no judge in San Francisco is so very well 
and favorably known and certainly very 
few of those on the bench stand as high with 
the legal fraternity of the city and county 
as does Judge Cabaniss. It is upon just 
such conditions a choice as to whom to vote 
for for judge of the superior court should 
be based and for that reason it is fully ex- 
pected that the careful business man will 
cast his ballot to continue Judge Cabaniss in 
office. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



St. Mary's 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 



Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 



VISIT 

"The 

Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 4772 



Modish Ailment 

"My husband is in bed today and I've sent 
for the doctor." 

"Is he as sick as that?" 

"No, but he's as thirsty as that." 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gougli 
Telephone Park 271 



(25 years in business) Kearny 2842 

ENJOY YOUR VACATION BY 
HAVING YOUR 

HAIR PERMANENTLY 
WAVED 

—at— 

COSGROVE'S HAIR STORE 

360 Geary Street 
San Francisco 

We consider the health of your hair. 
Mr. J. and Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove 



The Whole Story ! 

"My minis are a hundred per cent 
Find enclosed $1.00 for an- 
other treatment." — Mrs. M. F. M., 
San Jo e. Calif. 

Mrs. M. F. M. has been using 

PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's 
Home Treatment for 

Pyorrhea and Sore Gums 

Package with directions postpaid for 
$1.00 

Phone or write today 

DR. W. W. HO AG LAND 

908 Mark-t Sr.. San Francisco 

(Mention New* Letter) 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 19, 1922 




PLEASURE/S WAND 



A REAL OLD-FASHIONED THRILL 

You all have heard of the man who takes 
the greatest delight in running to a fire; of 
the fellow who leaves his business to go to 
a baseball game and of the thousand and 
cne men, women and children who get their 
real truly-rooly thrill by going to a circus, 
and the more old fashioned the circus the 
grepter the thrill. 

The Sells-Floto aggregation cf wonders 
and stunt makers will be with us next and 
we are all of us going. Just think of it— 



'Obey No Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

cause ten of the elephants are babies and 
the noise of Market street and the sight of 
the tall buildings might scare the poor little 
things, so they are made to stay at home. 
Tom Thumb, he is four months old, is the 
smallest baby elephant in the world. He is 
only three feet high and weighs 276 pounds. 
And he feeds on rice, that is all, thank you, 
and doing quite well. 

It is a three-ringed circus and it has two 
stages, in an aerial maze, with a vast hip- 
podrome racing track, and all housed under 




■ 




BWfc- i'ii HW^ i in nil 

A FEW OF THE ELEPHANTS WITH SELLS-FLOTO CIRCUS 



ten baby elephants. One baby elephant in 
a circus is usually thought an event, but 
ten — count 'em. And now, don't forget the 
street parade. It is said to be the largest and 
most spectacularly gorgeous in the whole 
wide world. In this parade will be seen 480 
beautiful horses; it is the smartest and best 
groomed of all street shows. There are twen- 
ty elephants with the show, but in the street 
parade you will see but ten. For why? Be- 



a huge six-pole tent. The show opens up 
with the "Night in Cairo" every afternoon 
and evening. This lyrical performance em- 
ploys 1100 animals and persons in its rendi- 
tion. Some show! After that comes the 
arena cast of 750 artists. And that is how 
San Franciscans are going to get the real 
old fashioned thrill. 



SAH FRAHC1SCO 



m NftVOt<4NA.t 




I 

m 

m 

. _■ 

M ™ s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 23c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 

and Loges 



Granada 

"Embarrassement des riches" at the Gra- 
nada this week. With so much and such a 
variety embodied in the program, one feels 
that he has attended several theaters instead 
of one, and even a Scotchman must admit 
he's got his money's worth. The "Dance 
Divertissement" is a beautiful and rhythmic 
creation, showing Anita Peters' pupils to 
great advantage. "A Trip to Paramount 
Town" is an ingenious combination of movie 
display and movie publicity; a clever 
achievement on the part of the producers 
who know full well how film fans dearly 
love the "personal touch." Many well-known 
stars are shown at work "on the lot," and 
many a flapper's heart goes pit-a-pat as 
she sees her heroes in the act of acting. 
Then there is the comedy, "The Ladder 



Jinx," built on familiar superstitions that 
we all own up to, and carrying rather more 
of a plot than most of these comedies. Paul 
Ash is back. His vacation seems to have 
jazzed him up tremendously, and the per- 
formance of his popular orchestra is more 
spirited than ever. A good news film fol- 
lows. All this, and an ultra-comfortable arm 
chair in a spacious loge. What more could 
one ask? 



Portola 

Seldom have Portola patrons been treated 
to a finer program than the current show, 
consisting of the play "Her Only way," With 
Norma Talmadge and Eugene O'Brien, and 
a Mack Sennett comedy, "By Heck," with 
Billy Evans and Mildred June in the prin- 
cipal characters. The combination of Miss 
Talmadge and O'Brien is a happy one; they 
work well together and both are prime fav- 
orites in the motion picture world. 



Strand 

All lovers of Charles Ray will be pleased 
with this week's film. "The Deuce of Spades" 
has a generous mixture of comedy and a bit 
of real life thrown in to make it realistic. 
A large cast surrounds the star and the set- 
tings are quite up to standard, while the 
filming is adequate. This production will 
hardly add to Ray's reputation but will 
amuse nearly everyone. In addition to the 
feature there is a fine musical bill and the 
short reels which make up the program. 



California 

There must be some peculiar reason why 
House Peters has been featured three weeks 



HOTEL PLA7A 

Jan francisco 




DINING-ROOM 

Surprisingly good meals 
pleasingly served. Note 
t h e moderate prices : 

Jreakfa»t 25c to 75c 
Luncheon 65c 
I>lnner $1.25 

(A la Carte Service also) 



August 19, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



17 



running at different theaters. If the films 
improved each time it might be accounted 
for, but when they do not, we are inclined 
to get blase. The current offering is very 
meager in plot and novelty, and recalls to 
mind several other domestic dramas which 
far surpass it. Peters and Claire Winsor do 
good work but the direction has missed a 
number of the finer points which a produc- 
tion of this sort needs to be convincing. 

Severi has arranged two musical numbers 
of considerable interest and the short num- 
bers are well selected. 



ious methods. Tom Smith is a funny man — 
and everybody loves him. His popularity 
threatens to back off all the rest of the show. 
But he is released at last and Joe Rolley 
with his clever company, also Heras and 
Wblls in an amusing act, have their turn 
contributing to the entertainment of the 
Orpheum's big program, one of the best this 
writer has ever seen on a vaudeville stage. 



Columbia 

All the world loves a lover. And with 
immediate ease does it love a humble and 
hopeless young royal lover. Poor, dear 
George in the play "Just Suppose" is indeed 
a lovable person. He is a young prince, 
you know "staggering about the States a 
bit," and one fatal moonlight night he runs 
away from boredom of diplomatic society 
in Washington right smack into the danger- 
ous presence of a lovely Virginia girl, and 
it's goodnight George! Some exquisite love 
scenes follow, and then the melting weeps — 
for the girl is a high-souled lass and she 
gives him up to his country and his crown, 
and of course this is»deIicious!y painful for 
the audience. Rather too sentimental, say 
you? Not at all, at all; can't have too much 
of that sort of thing in this sordid, work-a- 
day world, if it is well done — and certainly 
"Just Suppose" is ably acted, cleverly con- 
structed and pleasingly presented. The hero- 
ine is Isabelle Lowe's part, and she puts 
a great deal into it; she's very pretty and 
has a satisfying understanding of her work. 
Creighton Hale plays the nice young prince, 
and again let it be said that he is most en- 
dearing. Mrs. Thomas Whiffin, a delightful 
and finished actress of other days, appears 
as an aristocratic and affectionate grandmere, 
wearing beautiful old-school clothes and 
warming the hearts of her audience who 
heaped California flowers at her feet and 
almost brought the tears to her happy eyes. 
The supporting company is entirely capable, 
William Lloyd and Louis Morrison doing 
some excellent acting as embassy friends of 
His Royal Highness. There is a good bit of 
fun in the piece, and a fine tone of delicate 
honor, and a lot of young love that is about 
the purest, sweetest thing in life. 



Orpheum 

With Duci de Kerekjarto and his violin 
on the program, one has little thought for 
anything else in the whole world; his music 
sings in the souls of his hearers. Carried 
away, far away from the carking cares of 
existence, they soar in the remote realms 
created by his genius. It takes a long time 
to get back to earth. Once there, they real- 
ize that the Gus Edwards Revue is in full 
swing and that jazz and laughter fill the air. 
Pretty girls doing wild dances and singing 
gay tunes; comedians cracking jokes. Then 
Roscoe Ails. Kate Pullman and a syncopated 
orchestra take the stage and the fun waxes 
more furious. Princess Wah-Letka makes 
us pause and ponder, so remarkable are her 
occult abilities and so amazing her myster- 



Farewell Week at Alcazar 

As though to magnify our regret at the 
breaking up of the Alcazar company, the 
play this final week is one of the best ever 
given in the good old theater, and one of the 
very best acted. Clair Kummer's "Moun- 
tain Man" is a romantic comedy, with a 
pleasing plot and much clever dialogue. The 
characters are strong with individuality and 
the casting has been unerring. Katherine 
Van Buren, a beautiful girl with an agree- 
able voice and diction, endearing little man- 
nerisms and unmistakable intelligence, plays 
Delaney McCloud, the heroine of the piece, 
with much charm. Gladys Emmons is effec- 
tive as her maiden aunt. Charles Yule does 
some good acting as Major Miles McCloud, 
genial Southern lawyer, and Dudley Ayres 
made one of the hits of his career in the 
title role. As Aaron Winterfield, this popu- 
lar young leading man has an opportunity 
to express his undoubted talent and likeable 
personality. Rankin Mansfield, a new juve- 
nile member of the company, has very little 
to indicate a career ahead of him on the 
stage. But Gladys Cassell, essaying "flap- 
per" roles, is full of promise. Frederick 
Green had a small part of a French army 
officer; Marie Dunkle that of a gossipy neigh- 
bor; Ned Doyle an old-fashioned darky 
butler and Brady Kline a rough moun- 
taineer. The play was given in a manner 
most creditable to the management, showing 
careful preparation in every detail. 



The Players 

"The First Fifty Years" with William 
Rainey and Evelyn Vaughan is in its second 
week, and on Monday evening Sheridan's 
famous old comedy, "The Rivals" will be 
revived at the little Bush street theater with 
a cast that is sure to a'tract. 

William Rainey will play Captain Jack 
Absolute, a part worthy of this fine young 
actor. Emily Melville is going to do Mrs. 
Malaprop, one of her notable roles. Miss 
Vaughan as Lydia Languish and Miss Anne 
O'Day as Lucy — what could be better — and 
Reginald Travers himself will be Sir Anthony. 
On Frederick McNulty falls a mantle worn 
by the great Jefferson, and judging from 
past performances, there is reason to be- 
lieve that the portrayal of Bob Acres will 
be a good one. 



and this acting is supplied by House Peters, 
Matt Moore, Virginia Valli and a large com- 
pany in their support. The atmospheric tab- 
leau preceding "The Storm" is a breath- 
taking spectacle. Music, vocal and instru- 
mental, also the news film, complete a splen- 
did program. 



A Rare Treat at Orpheum Next Week 

It is very rarely indeed that we find a 
complete program as that of the Orpheum 
announced for next week. Just look at it and 
you will surely find much to please you. 
There is, for instance, Emma Carus. She is 
with us with new songs and with her ac- 
companist, J. Walter Leopold. And there is 
Lew Dockstader, one of the old stand-bys. 
He certainly developed very early in life the 
"gift of gab" and with his new sketch "Talk- 
ing Through His Hat" he will keep you 
going. The Marmein Sisters, Miriam and 
Irene, are clever dancers and they are in 
turn assisted by Ruth and Albert Kirst. Ros- 
coe Ails is there with Kate Pullman, and her 
band, and a hundred laughs. Princess Wah- 
Letka is an Indian mystic and seeress and 
she proves amazingly entertaining. Billie 
Burke and the Tango Shoes will hold you 
down for a while and Bob Murphy will give 
you a "different act," while Jean Barrios, 
who is by the way San Francisco born, will 
please you with a series of song impressions. 
Altogether a program that you will find it 
very hard to beat. 



Imperial 

"The Storm" is still raging. No abatement 
of its terrific force and no noticeable decrease 
in the number of eager onlookers. Thrills 
are agreeable disturbances when vicariously 
experienced, and thrills are what one gets, 
thick and fast, while watching the magnifi- 
cent screen production of this play. The 
picture gives opportunity for great acting. 



A lawyer's customer is called a client and 
a doctor's a patient, but often after a lawyer 
renders his bill the client becomes a patient. 



Are Your 
Brakes Safe? 

Brakes Relined 

and Adjusted 

While You Wait 

Kvery Job cmirant enl hy mir nrw method. 

We run nave ymi Irom $3 l<> $6 OD rnrli 

job. 

Free Bervlce and ad I year 

from over 250 authorized P. C. SI 

extending from San Diego to S 

Wash, i- i' i ii hiding 

S. F. BRAKE SERVICE 

si. Praaela Garage, 1240 Poel si. 
Phone Prospect 1916 



Independent Buyers' League 

furnishes its MEMBERS with 
ANYTHING sold at whole- 
sale at wholesale prices. 
Be a Member 

Independent Buyers' League 

833 Market St.. Room 902 

Phonr. Dou^la* 1203.1201 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 19, 1922 



Fred Kahn 

Automotive Engineering in its 
Entirety 

UNDER ONE ROOF 



General Repairing and Overhauling 

Fender and Ignition 

Radiator Work Welding 
Body Building Brazing 

Woodwook Blacksmithing 

Machine Work Electrical 

Carburetion 



Experts in Every Branch 
1507 SUTTER Telephone West 8296 

Authorized Elgin Parts and Service 



Watch Your Feet 




Weak, fallen or broken arches reduce 
your efficiency, cause headache, back- 
ache, sciatica, pelvic and stomach trou- 
ble, as well as other ailments. 

THE POST SYSTEM 

for foot correction restores the flexi- 
bility and resiliency of the feet. 

The Post System for Foot Correction 
259 Geary Street, San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 6147 



Located in the Financial District 

MARTIN'S GRILL 

SALADS OUR SPECIALTY 

Business Luncheon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
548 Sacramento St., Cor. Leidesdorff 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Plione Kearny 391 San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing; manu- 
scripts for publication, which Is Important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



The Automobile 

An Interesting Combination 

The Earl P. Cooper, Inc., and the Guaran- 
tee Battery Company have been merged and 
this merger is to the benefit of everybody who 
may be interested in any way in the automo- 
tive industry or in the ownership or operation 
of a pleasure car or a truck automobile. The 
officers of the new organization, which is 
called the Earl Cooper-Guarantee Battery 
Company, are as follows: Earl P. Cooper, 
president; Fred J. Brand, vice-president and 
treasurer; George E. Cushman, second vice- 
president, and Austin D. Rouse, secretary. All 
of those who are in the firm stand so high in 
the automotive world that comment seems 
altogether unnecessary but we will say that 
an economy and an efficiency in operation 
has been effected that will reduce charges to 
the automobile owners. The Earl P. Cooper 
establishment in Oakland was also brought 
into the consolidation. 



When Turning Corners 

It is a wise precaution, when turning cor- 
ners, to make a practice of throwing out the 
clutch. In addition to being a precaution 
for a quick stop in case of emergency, it has 
a beneficial effect on the rear tires. When- 
ever a turn is made, there is a tendency to 
skid, as the car endeavors to continue for- 
ward in a straight path. This produces a 
side strain on the tires, the magnitude of 
which depends upon the weight of the car, 
the radius of the turn and the speed of mo- 
tion. If the clutch is left engaged the rear 
tires are also subjected to the backward drag 
due to traction. Releasing the clutch relieves 
this strain, as the car is pulling the wheels, 
instead of the wheels pulling the car. 



The Rear Axle Truss Rod 

The truss rod, which extends from end 
to end beneath the rear axle, is placed there 
for the purpose of supporting the axle, to 
keep it from sagging under the strain of 
the load and the vibration due to road 
shocks. This rod should always be kept 
tight, otherwise it will not serve the purpose 
for which it was placed there. When 
tapped with a hammer it should give forth 
a high pitched metallic twang; a low toned 
sound indicates that tightening is necessary. 
When the car is new this rod may loosen 
frequently due to the stretching of the metal, 
which will cease after being tightened sev- 
eral times. If the truss rod stretches to such 
an extent that further tightening is impos- 
sible, it should be shortened by cutting; it 
is useless to shorten it by bending, as this 
will not keep it rigid enough. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4636 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 
FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



$142 
AN ACRE 

1500 Acres 23 Miles 
down the Peninsula 

richly wooded land highly adapted to sub- 
division into smaller acreage homes in 
a fogless climate. The last oppor- 
tunity to acquire land of its class 
suburban to the city. 

Only 945,000 cash needed; 
balunce 5 yearn 

C. M. WOOSTER 

320 Phelan Bide. 

San Francisco 



CHARLES G. JOHNSON 

Candidate for the Republican Nomination 
for 

STATE TREASURER 

Formerly State Superintendent of Weights 
and Measures; organized that Public 
Service and wrote the Net Contulner 
Act. The rubllc Welgu-Master Act 
and the Weights and Measures Lows. 

Eight years of Public Service without 
Criticism. 



Special Representative of the U. 
Administration during war. 



S. Food 



Organizer of the "California Home tiuord." 

Speaker In every National Bond Drive. 

Chairman Nationality Bond Drive for Sac- 
ramento County. 

Twenty years of BANKING and COM- 
MERCIAL EXPERIENCE. 

Forty-two years old. Married and Father 
of Four Children. 



Re-elect 
JUDGE A. T. 




BARNETT 

JUSTICE OF 
THE PEACE 



Incumbent Presiding Justice 

Name on all Party Tickets. 



For Re-election 

GEORGE H. 

CABANISS 

Judge of the Superior Court 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




WE KNOW HOW 

Your car is piling up a big repair bill 
every mile you drive without proper 
lubrication. You can depend upon 

LOYAL AND EFFICIENT SERVICE 
at the 

DE LUXE GARAGE & SERVICE STATION 

Post and Hyde Sts. Phone Franklin 3 



MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AND ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1922 

Assets $76,170,177.18 

Deposits 72,470,177.18 

Capital Actually Paid Up - - - - „ - 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds - - - 2,700,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund ----- 385,984.61 

A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4 Yi ) per cent 
per annum was declared for the six months ending June 30th, 1922. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 



Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 

first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6 3/4% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 
Fald Up Capital S15.000.000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 ReserT* Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 



San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 11 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



Electrical Repairs, Motor Mainte- 
nance, Electrical Fixtures, Wiring, 
Supplies 



Goldberg & Wilson Electric Co. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS AND 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 



2030 Polk Street 

Phone Prospect 752S 

SAN FRANCISCO - - - CALD7. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.).... 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays.. SI. 75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



/ 






r 



Can You SAVE 50c a 
day for your future 

if you live — .for your family's future if 
you don't? This deposit GUARANTEES 
$5000 whether you live or die. At age 35 
deposit required only 24 years, according 
to our present dividend schedule. 

ARTHUR J. HILL 

California Manager. State Life of Indiana, 
1001 Monadnock Bldg., San Francisco 

1 

If you can save 5 0c a day, fill in and I 
mail this blank to Mr. Hill. No obli- i 
gation is entailed. 

Name I 



Address 

Age nearest birthday. 



[_. 



Casa Del Rey 



SANTA CRUZ 



CALIFORNIA 



The ^Million 1)ollar Fireproof Hotel 



THE ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm 
beach bathing; dancing; good music; artistic, home-like 
spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful 
playgrounds; sanitary warm bathing pool; swimming 
instructors; saddle ponies for children. Special kitchen- 
ette in hotel proper where maid can prepare food for 
young children. 

Complete highways, through the most beautiful sec- 
tion of California. (Only 80 miles.) The Southern Pa- 
cific offers unusually low rates from all California points; 
the warmest and most accessible beach out of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also 
under the same management as Casa Del Rey. 

Correspondence about rates for families with maids 
and children solicited. Special rates by the week or for 
extended stays of a month or two. Address: 



CASA DEL REY : : SANTA CRUZ, CALIFORNIA 

MORRIS & WARNER, Proprietors. Phone 600 



The Pacific 

Mutual Life Insurance Company 

of California 

Announces the Appointment of 

PAUL C. JONES 

as MANAGER of the 

Business Insurance Department 

— of the — 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH OFFICE 




mpreme 

intajte flavor & aroma 

©well's 

^-^ NATIONAL CREST 




155 Montgomery Street 



1.800,000 cupj were served 
attte PANAMA- PACIFIC 
Iviematioml EXPOSITION- 



Telephones 
Batter 6664 — Oakland 1017 



V>€U^ 



Established July 20, 1856 







PRICE 10 CENTS _ , „ Z. $5.00 PER YEAR 

TAX PAYERS WEEKLY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1922 



LOS ANGELES 




EARLY SAN FRANCISCO (No. 19). The Italian Fishing Fleet 



MILLS & HAGBOM 

New Location, ALEXANDER BUILDING 
155 Montgomery St., Cor. Bush 



REDWOOD LODGE and BUNGALOWS 

IN THE HEART OF THE SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS — Established 1859 

A ROMANTIC RESORT FOR WEEK-END AND PERMANENT GUESTS — FAMOUS FOR 

HOSPITALITY — GOOD MEALS AND EVERYTHING — 3-HOUR DRIVE OVER NEW LOS 

GATOS-SANTA CRUZ HIGHWAY — OPEN THE YEAR ROUND 

Ask Any S. P. Ticket Agent; See Peck-Judah Co., 672 Market St., San Francisco, or Crabtree's, 
Oakland, or Address A. P. COX, Prop., WRIGHTS, CAL. 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



&att 3xwt\mt$ OHjrnmrb 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 

A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



Best Equipped and Most MODERN 
GARAGE West of Chicago 

The Century 



Two Blocks from Union Square 
675 Post Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Between Taylor and Jones 



We Stand for the Best in Business 
Training 



Munson 




e)l School 



For 
PRIVATE SECRETARIES 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 
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NOTICE 

In the Superior Court of the State of California 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cIbco. 

In the matter of the application of the San Fran- 
cisco News Letter and California Advertiser, 
to be declared a newspaper of general cir- 
culation under the provisions of section 4460 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Notice is hereby given that Frederick Marriott 
has filed in the above entitled court a petition 
alleging that the San Francisco News Letter and 
California Advertiser, is and ever since July 
20, 1856, has been a newspaper established, 
printed and published at regular intervals, 
namely, on each Saturday, excepting the Sat- 
urday following the great fire of April 18, 1906, 
for the dissemination of local and telegraphic 
news and intelligence of general character and 
having a bonafide subscription list of paying 
subscribers, and that it has been declared to be 
a newspaper of general circulation by decree 
of the above entitled court given in or about 
the year 1880, but that the records thereof have 
been destroyed and asking that it be adjudged 
and decreed to be a newspaper of general cir- 
culation within the provision of section 4460 
of the Political Code of the State of California. 
Said order will be applied for before Depart- 
ment No. 1 of the above entitled court 
upon Tuesday. September 12, 1922. at the hour 
of 10 a. m. at which time and place any person 
interested may appear and show cause if any 
they have why said petition should not be 
granted. 
Dated June 28, 1922. 

FREDERICK MARRIOTT. 
C. F. Adams, Attorney at Law, 703 Market St. 



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OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seems ne ceo Bar;-" 
The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or, if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1SB6 




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fll 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CI 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 1922 



No. 8 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— We should all be for more roads, better roads and longer roads. 
All of these lead to the great highway called Prosperity boulevard. 

— Isn't it about time for some one to start a cry that gasoline 
is giving out? Haven't heard that howl for about two weeks and 
getting quite lonesome about it, too. 

— Sun Yat Sen is issuing manifestoes from Shanghai and is not 
yet ready to say he is not the real president of the Chinese republic. 
That man is certainly a fine mate for De Valera. 

— The welcome news comes that the Senate is ready now to pass 
the tariff bill. Probably that will be some consolation to those in 
the export and import and shipping business — tariff tinkering blows 
them no good at any time. 

— A woman makes the trip from New York to San Francisco in 
an automobile and is used as a front page story by the newspapers. 
Hundreds of men and women have made the same trip and were 
not featured in the papers. 

3£ 3p 2fi 

— Deauville is trying to break the record in getting free pub- 
licity for its sins and its gambling houses. There is little excuse for 
giving the American people any information about the place in the 

daily press. Why is it done? 

* ¥ * 

— Four Indian maidens escape from homes where they were placed 
and find sleeping quarters in an Oakland park. It is said they will 
be punished. Better examine into the conditions which may exist 
in the homes they fled from. 

— They have discovered the ruins of a very large city in the wilds 
of Columbia, South America. It is a strange thing if such a city 
did not at some time exist in that wonderfully rich country. How 
the city was destroyed no one knows. 

— The Brazilians have developed a scheme of valorization. You 
do not know what that is? Well, it means that whenever there if 
a surplus production of crops in any direction, especially as to 
coffee, the country buys up the surplus crop and puts it away so 
as to keep coffee, or any other product, from running low in price. 
Sometimes it happens that bumper crops follow one another for 
several years. What then? That is the question, what then? The 
valorization convention will have to decide. 



— D'Annunzio is talked of to take the place of the king and to 
be made president of Italy. The poor man fell down in his garden 
and hurt his head and is now unconscious and he is incapable of 
any defense as to what his friends propose doing to him. 

J£ ^ if 

— Valera fleeing in a large carriage is the latest from Ireland. Where 
to? Valera and Sun Yat Sen have just about reached the period 
in their existences when they would be income producers for a 

museum of freaks, to be labelled the "Whatmighthavebeens." 

* * * 

— The Duke and the Duchess de Taleyrand will be with us soon 
on a visit. They bring with them a maid and a pedigreed Pekingese. 
The pedigree of the dog has not been published but will probably 
appear in parallel columns with that of the duke when they get here. 

— The strikers having had their picnic at destroying other peo- 
ple's property and maltreating and crippling their fellow men, 
sometimes killing them, are getting ready to go back to work. All 
you have to do now is to keep right on working to pay for the costs 
of the labor strike. You always do pay for it. 

— Flying fire engines are to be the thing very soon and we will 
have them flying about in the air whenever a fire of magnitude 
shows itself in our large cities. They will drop extinguishers in the 
form of bombs on fires and will carry hose and water into the skies 
to squirt down on the burning buildings. Let's go. 

— Eggs is eggs at all times but when it is a case of an egg fes- 
tival at Petaluma and samples are sent down here as delegates we 
find that eggs may be eggs in Petaluma, but when they get to San 
Francisco they are pretty sure to be beautiful chickens. Send along 
some more of the same kind as the last. 

— A very good sign of the times is found in the fact that various 
bodies of men and women in the country, engaged in farming and 
in the industries, are asking that strikes be made an impossibility 
by the substitution of laws which compel obedience to decisions by 
arbitration or other boards by employers and employes. 

* * * 

— Ireland is fast nearing the stage of being pacified as far as 
the struggle between the National army and the Irregulars is con- 
cerned. That being over with, what is the next scrap to be? Please 
do not all speak at once. There's Ulster, for instance. Why not 
take a slap at her, just to keep the National army in fighting trim? 

* * * 

— There are so many conventions going on in San Francisco at 
one and the same time that it is becoming quite confusing to the 
merely resident. You never know if it is a fire chief, a police chief, 
a Pythian Knight, a delegate to the lawyer's conflab, or a lodge 
member of some of a hundred orders you are talking to. There are 
more delegates from this or that part of the country than there are 
actual residenters. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 26, 1922 




EDITORIAL MENTION 




There have been many who have been 
Swinging the Big Stick waiting to hear the swish of the big stick 
as it descended somewhere and made 
known the will of Washington in the strike controversy but the swish 
was not heard and the stick was not swung, when it should have 
been. In one particular the President was a distinct failure, in the 
negotiations which have been going on since the strikes began. No 
amount of argument can change that fact. When Mr. Harding, 
whom we hold in the highest respect, made the proposition that, in 
resuming their places with the railroads, the men be given their 
seniority rights, Mr. Harding made a woeful mistake, a mistake which 
made the situation much more tense and the conditions worse for 
the railroad managers and the strikes much less likely to be ar- 
ranged harmoniously. The fact of the matter is that Mr. Harding 
"straddled" the question and in matters of disputes between man 
and man, employe and employer, straddling is a most dangerous 
practice. 

The situation was a perfectly plain and clear case and the strad- 
dling was entirely unnecessary. The strikers had left their jobs. 
Quit their posts. They did this voluntarily. It must be assumed 
they did not specify that any rights, which they had come to have 
because of loyalty to the roads, should be retained by them, al- 
though they had given up their positions and had shown a gross 
disloyalty to the companies formerly employing them. They threw 
up their positions because they were dissatisfied with a decision 
which had been rendered adversely to their desires by a govern- 
ment board, appointed to hear their grievances and those of their 
employers, as to wages. It must not be forgotten they did not leave 
their jobs in protest at anything done to them or attempted to be 
done by their late employers. 

Coming back to work under the Harding suggestion they would 
have been handed back all of the benefits which had accrued to 
their credit up to the time they quit their jobs. It must be remem- 
bered also that after quitting their jobs they and their friends and 
sympathizers rioted, beat up free working men who were willing to 
work, destroyed railroad property, burned houses, killed men, 
bombed trains and roundhouses, derailed trains and in many other 
ways, acted like red revolutionists of the very worst type. 

Under these conditions Mr. Harding straddled and attempted to 
have the rail managements hand back seniority rights as a reward 
to the returning strikers. 

The San Francisco News Letter believes in even handed justice 
to the employer and the employed, to the worker and striker, to the 
man of capital and the man of brawn, and in dealing out even- 
handed justice, that the decision rendered may endure and be re- 
spected by all, there must be no straddling. 



The alarmists are always with us. Last week 
Always Alarmists they were evident as regards the strikes. A wave 

of misinformation swept over San Francisco and 
Oakland. The burden of the story which was whispered about was 
that the National Guard was being concentrated at Monterey for 
the purpose of acting against the strikers. People, who up to that 
time, were supposed to possess ordinary horse sense, looked pre- 
occupied and filled with the poison fear and went about breathing 
the story in willing listeners' ears. Why are some people such dam- 
phools? Fear probably makes more fools than anything else and 
fear is found everywhere at all times. Let us banish fear and we 
will, at the same time, banish seven times seven other hellish things 
that travel about with fear and attach themselves to us and do us 
injury. People prefer to put their faith in baseless rumor than in 
certified blown in the bottle fact. If you try to make them feel 



good and happy with some pleasant truth they will run from you 
to the peddler of lies who fills them with bug-eyed fear. Let's go. 



At last German statesmen admit that the effect 
They Admit It Now of issuing paper marks based on thin air and 
the printing press for their value, meaning 
nothing at all but the fiat of the republic, is national bankruptcy. 
We have known that all of the time and we have written about it 
and others have written about it, but while everyone everywhere 
seemed concerned as to what would happen the clever Germans 
must be supposed not to have known anything at all about it. Now, 
don't you believe that at all. They knew all of the time that the 
mark was dwindling in value and would dwindle and must con- 
tinue to dwindle and a great big fraud is being practiced on the 
German people by Germans, who are profiting by the depreciation 
in the buying power of this limitless paper money. 

Two objects are achieved by this national bankruptcy. One of 
them is found in the clean-up made by German exporters, who re- 
ceieve their pay for paper marks paid labor in the gold of foreign 
countries. The other object is found in the bankruptcy of the na- 
tion, because it places the Allies in the position of either taking 
over the management of Germany and its industries, in their en- 
tirety, or of letting the Germans work out a long termed salvation 
process. Probably the funniest thing coming over the cables last 
week was the story of the German statesman who wept copiously 
as he told of the poor mark and where it had fallen. Nobody is 
a better judge of Germany and the Germans than a German and 
this weeping statesman was an exhibit for foreign consumption only. 
Meanwhile Germany has defaulted her reparations payments and 
the world is waiting to see what the celebrated opportunist Lloyd 
George may have to suggest as a cure. France has said her say and 
it seems a most sensible statement. The French have predicted just 
what has happened. The British have chaffered and traded and are 
still at the game of trying to secure some kind of trade and tactical 
advantage over the French and the rest of us. The German posi- 
tion is that of asking the world "vat are you going to do aboud it, 
anyvay." 



The very important special meeting of 
New Committee to Discuss the board of supervisors was held on 
Market Street Railway August 1 5 last for determining whether 

or not the board should meet with the 
representatives of the Market Street Railway Company for the pur- 
pose of arriving at a fair price and terms to be submitted to the 
people for their acceptance or rejection. The board is much to be 
commended for the business-like way in which they took up the 
question and disposed of it. Perhaps nothing is more annoying to 
citizens who are unselfishly interested in our city, than harassing 
delays in the disposition of important questions by city officials. 
To the credit of the board be it said that after hearing some rep- 
resentatives of various of our greatest organizations and substan- 
tial citizens and a full discussion, it was unanimously voted to 
discharge the old committee, which could not agree, and to direct 
the mayor to appoint a new committee to continue negotiations. The 
various interests of the city present were in favor of this action. 
Whatever may be the difference between some of the large organiza- 
tions of the city they stand together shoulder to shoulder for 
the relief in our street railway situation by unifying our street car 
systems through the purchase of the Market Street Railway Com- 
pany by the city. 

There were present and urging this action representatives of the 
the Chamber of Commerce, the Civic League of Improvement Clubs, 



August 26, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



the Building Trades Council, the Real Estate Board, the Labor 
Council, the Downtown Association, the Federation of Women's 
Clubs, the Vigilante Committee, and members from the Oceanside 
Improvement Club, Point Lobos Improvement Club, and Park- 
Presidio Improvement Club. Earnest speeches were made by Dr. 
John Galey, P. H. McCarthy, Daniel O'Connell, Dr. Mariana Ber- 
tola. Mrs. D. E. F. Easton, Mrs. W. B. Hamilton, George Skaller, 
R. M. J. Armstrong, T P. Robinson and Edgar Pexiotto. There 
were also present many hundreds of citizens who were interested 
in this matter being taken up and disposed of. The resolution for 
discharging the old committee was introduced by Supervisor E. E. 
Schmitz. The resolution for the appointment by the mayor of a 
new committee was introduced by Supervisor John A. McGregor. 

The prompt and unanimous vote of the board of supervisors in 
favor of these resolutions is most gratifying to our citizens, and it 
is hoped that the board will continue with its good work by finish- 
ing up this matter without further delay. 



the Sunday and other holidays. The people are demanding a reduc- 
tion of these accidents, all of which are avoidable if the proper 
care was taken by everyone driving an automobile. 



At a meeting of newspaper men held 
Richardson for Governor here State Treasurer Friend W. Rich- 
ardson, Republican candidate for gov- 
ernor, outlined his platform of efficiency and economy in state gov- 
ernment. He charged the administration with extravagance and 
based his words on actual figures taken from the state records. 

"The extravagance of the state government is putting a heavy 
burden upon the people," he said. "It is causing unemployment, 
stifling industry and driving away new enterprises. The biennial 
budget has increased six times as fast as population. Hundreds 
of unnecessary employes are encumbering the payroll, scores of 
political bosses are traveling at state expense in state-owned pleas- 
ure automobiles, and the people's money is being squandered by 
the millions. 

"In 1919 the governor signed bills exceeding $52,000,000. In 
1921 the budget totalled more than $91,000,000. An increase of 
74 per cent. This transpired despite the fact that he went before 
the people four years ago on an economy and efficiency platform. 

"His program of efficiency is answered by a reorganization plan 
which has abolished no offices, has increased the payroll, has re- 
named a number of officers, has weakened the efficiency of civil 
service, and has caused endless confusion; a plan without harmony 
or co-ordination, a stupid camouflage intended to fool the taxpayers. 

"As state treasurer I have been in a position to see the reckless 
extravagance practiced and to know where and how the costs of 
government can be reduced, without hampering any humane, pro- 
gressive of educational functions of the state. 

"I pledge myself, if elected, to substitute business for politics 
in state government, abolish unnecessary offices and commissions, 
restore efficiency to the various departments, put highway construc- 
tion in the hands of skilled road builders, attend strictly to the busi- 
ness of the office, and while meeting all necessary needs of the state 
will save the people millions of dollars." 



It is not only perfectly proper but it is necessary 
Traffic Regulations that at all times traffic regulations should be 

enforced and the judges before whom are haled 
the offenders should see to it that requisite and proper punishment 
is inflicted on anyone who is caught breaking the laws, provided 
to ensure the public's safety. The San Francisco News Letter has 
no apology to offer for the campaign it has been making along these 
lines. It is especially gratifying that action has been taken by the 
police and that cutting in and speeding on our public streets is 
being stopped and the offenders brought up with a jerk. But this 
kind of action by the police must be made a matter of everyday, 
and it should not be necessary for a newspaper, or an individual, to 
kick up a row to bring about remedial action. Enforcement of the 
traffic regulations will do a great deal toward the elimination of the 
awful lists of automobile accidents and deaths and mamings over 



It is encouraging to hear that we have fewer idle 
Our Idle Ships steamships now than two months ago. Many of 

the vessels now in commission are bringing coal to 
this country from abroad and others have been placed on various 
lines, in the hope of stimulating trade. The Shipping Board is being 
wisely managed and this is showing itself in a less expensive cost of 
operation and in better returns for services rendered. It is time, how- 
ever, that steps should be taken as rapidly as possible to have the 
Shipping Board go out of business and place the merchant marine 
of the country under the management and ownership of private cor- 
porations and individual operators. It is deplorable that government 
competition should continue to stand in the way of the private owner 
or the corporation in the ocean traffic business. 



Being a good loser is being a good sport and 
Being Good Losers that is why the Britisher has always had that 

reputation. He has been known as a good loser. 
And he rarely has lost. Recently, however, in sports he has not 
shown the tendency to lose gracefully and with a smile. Carpentier 
seems to have walked away with the best the English can produce 
and then Dempsey knocks out Carpentier with apparent ease. And 
the British hate Dempsey. They sneer at his reported refusal to 
meet Wills, and when eventually it is arranged for the big fellow to 
meet any and all comers the assertion is made in sporting and other 
papers that the events will not take place. And a strange feeling 
of soreness over yachting, boxing, tennis, golfing, and other 
sports losses seems to pervade the British colonies. From far away 
Australia come sneering remarks about Dempsey. The Sydney Sun- 
day Times, in a caption to some pictures, makes the statement that 
Dempsey has plenty of time to be introduced to pretty Parisiennes 
but side-steps meeting Wills and that accounts for Mr. Dempsey sus- 
taining his smile. Another picture shows Dempsey carrying a small 
boy, and the Times caption reads that the younger hero is perhaps 
preparing to fight Carpentier, when he gets to be as big as Mr. 
Dempsey, the Dempseys being fond of fighting smaller men than 
themselves. Mr. Dempsey still remains too tired to meet Mr. Wills, 
until later on. This is a strange condition for the Australian to 
have worked himself into believing and it is not a condition which 
limits itself to malevolent and foolish remarks about pugs and sports 
but it seems to permeate the Australian mind as to anything Ameri- 
can, in almost any direction. The interesting part of it would be 
to be able to find out how the Australian got that way, anyhow. 
In one Australian paper Uncle Sam is referred to as a pawnbroker 
making money out of the necessitous condition the rest of the world 
is finding itself in and Uncle Sam is shown in cartoon as a Shylock. 



In the United States there is nothing but the 
A Kindly Feeling most friendly and kindly feeling about the Aus- 
tralians. Evidently, if anything has occurred to 
ruffle the feelings of the good people on the other side of the world 
as to this country we of the United States are blissfully unaware 
of anything having occurred of that character. We are carrying 
on, the great majority of us, without the knowledge that we are 
mean and low, that we loan money abroad at usurious interest, that 
we are, at home, given to having periodical lynching bees and that 
we are, for the most part, a low and undeserving and envious lot 
given over to wholesale moonshining and bootlegging, without mor- 
als or decent ancestry. Well, it certainly is a very queer world and 
sometimes we think it a mighty good thing we cannot see our- 
selves as others see us, especially when we know the foreign on- 
looker is afflicted with astigmatic strabismus and mental obliquity, 
poor misguided devil. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 26, 1922 






1 



Points 'for Property Owner 



\ii^Bmmmmmmsa&sKm&®&s&%mKS%®xsswm&%^ss:msm%s%mmEsmmMmmm&m!aMmmsmwfEmBm 




THERE is no subject which should possess as much interest for 
the property owner as streets and their paving. So many things 
are connected with streets and their paving that they may be con- 
sidered almost as collateral interests. 

The first requisite the property owner should take into considera- 
tion is that of what kind of material should be used in streets and 
their paving. It is now no longer a question as to what use a street 
is to get' but it has become, to a very large extent, simply a ques- 
tion to pave with the very best material for any use whatsoever. 

And it may be said that concrete paving is preferred by motor 
road engineers. Some road engineers prefer a concrete paving with 
some kind of topping, such as asphalt, to give it a softer running 
surface, but most engineers and road builders cling to the idea 
that concrete, just plain, ordinary, enduring concrete, is the thing, 
without frills and furbelows. 

It is true that we have those who make good bithulitic or asphalt 
roads and there are people who will lecture you on the value of 
the wood block and some adhere to the idea that brick makes the 
ideal paving. 

The advance made in paving all leans, in its results, to the 
strengthening the hands of those who contend that concrete is 
the best material of which to make road paving and gradually 
the concrete road is replacing that of any other kind of material, 
outside the roads built within city limits, where the matter of ex- 
pense is of much smaller moment to the taxpayers. 

Most of the great highways now being built in California and in 
other states are being built of concrete. Many experiments have 
been conducted over a period of years and the results have been 
of great educational value. For instance, it is now said that, in fact, 
the re-inforcement is responsible for a weakening of the road and 
that re-inforcing has a tendency to crack the roads under stress 
of heavy weights where if not re-inforced the road would last many 
more years. 

It has also been shown that concrete roads that are made four 
to six inches thick depend greatly upon what kind of a base they 
are built upon for their lasting quality. It has finally been demon- 
strated that roads built eight inches thick, of concrete, possess the 
best elements for lasting wear. In Australia, where the building of 
roads is just now a very vital subject for conversation, the argu- 
ment is advanced by competent engineers that the roads should be 
built ten inches thick. 

In order to dispose of the noise, which is usually created by a 
hard unyielding surfaced road, concrete has been covered with 
asphaltum or with mixtures of other material and asphaltum. This 
has been quite successfully used in cities, where every effort should 
be made to eliminate noises of all kinds. 

Recently in England and in this country the proposition, which 
seems absurd at first reading, has been made to cover roadways 
with concrete slabs and that these slabs be coated on the wearing 
side with rubber. The idea was called an impractical one but it did 
not appear so to engineers in England, and in this country, and 
slabs have been coated with rubber and sections of roads are ac- 
tually in use at this time, in order to demonstrate the practicability 
and the cost of such paving. 

To the property owner of city or suburban property, the ques- 
tion of the building of roads is subsidiary to that of the maintenance 
of roads. Maintenance of roads is of a much more difficult char- 
acter than the building of roads. It was Napoleon who said, while 
laying out a program of commercial roads, that any fool could 
lay out a road or a system of roads, but that it took a genius to 



effectively maintain such a system. It is due to this remark that 
the present very effective road maintenance of France was estab- 
lished and it is due to this system that France had such a splendid 
system of roads in such fine condition at all times until the big war. 

Road maintenance is a very costly part of city governing func- 
tions. It is a part of the city machinery which should be in the 
hands of the very best talent obtainable. Strange as it may seem, one 
one of the best repair systems is in vogue in the City of Mexico. 
Most of our American cities have no system at all — it is a case of 
hit or miss, and usually it is miss. 

The property owner should be vitally interested in having this 
road maintenance department kept right up to par. The reason for 
this is that if road repairs are kept up with the least possible delays 
the roads and the streets of a city will cost far less to maintain than 
if they are allowed to lapse along in the slip-shod fashion in vogue 
in so many of our big and little cities. 

It is not supposed it is necessary to argue that good roads and 
good streets enhance the value of property, make it return more 
money. The property owner should give this question of streets and 
how they should be paved his attention. He should study this 
question thoroughly. It is his money that is going to be spent and 
he should know how it is going to be spent and why. Few ques- 
tions coming up to him for consideration are as important as the 
road and street question. He should, in the first place, always meet 
such questions with an open mind, open to conviction. 

It is realized that, instinctively, the property owner feels that an 
attack on his reserve stock of money is intended whenever any kind 
of public improvement is mentioned. There is, however, no reason 
why the property owner should feel that way at all. Roads and 
streets are the arteries of a city or a state or of the nation. If 
these did not exist there would be little or no exchange of com- 
modities. If these do exist but are of such a character as to prevent 
an easy flow of trade along their length then these should be im- 
proved that this flow may move along in the easiest way possible. 
It is believed the property owner will admit that the above is true 
and yet, in many instances, he will stubbornly stand in the way of 
improvements being made. If these improvements are made and 
the funds to pay for them are found through a general assessment, 
or through the sale of bonds, the burden of which is borne by the 
community in general, the opposition of the property owner is not 
so strenuously made, if indeed it is made at all, but if the money 
is raised through district assessment and the property is made to 
pay its share of such improvements, through a direct assessment 
against it, then the property owner cannot, or will not, usually see 
the justice of the arrangement and sets up a great howl against any 
improvement at all. This is deplorably true when it is the case of 
the owner being "land poor." Holders of great estates are usually 
found in stony-faced opposition to anything being done in the way 
of road or street improvements. The reason for this opposition 
is found in selfishness and is not far away if one wants to find it. 
Estates in the hands of administrators are usually also found in 
solid opposition to anything like improvement of st^ets or roads. 
In the latter cases the administrators have usually no interest what- 
ever, beyond that found in administering the estate, winding it up 
for the heirs and getting it off their hands, and they do not care 
to have anything intervene in the way of special or extraordinary 
taxes or expenses while they are on the job. The owners of vast 
estates and the administrators of estates are wrong in the position 
they take and it is net at all difficult to demonstrate this to anybody 
but themselves. 



August 26, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 




The Near Lie 



«Bs»aaaii«a«^^ 



# 



A GREAT many women and men are experts in telling the near 
lie. To these people the assertion, which is not a lie but which 
by inference makes the other fellcw believe that which is not true, is a 
wonderfully clever attainment. Telling a story in a way to cause 
the listener to repeat it and make your point for you although, by 
the repetition, the listener is being made to peddle around what really 
amounts to a lie is an art. 

Politicians have become so adept at that kind of work they do 
not know when they are practicing it. It is so with the politician, 
who returns from Washington and asks his constituency to send 
him back to the Senate because he, single-mouthedly, fought the 
people's battles. He put the tar.ff on prunes and lemons, he saved 
the day for labor, he fought the enemies of the common people to 
a stand still. He asks no reward but he does believe the people 
should continue to be served as faithfully as he has served them in 
the past and there isn't really anyone on the political horizon who 
can do it as well as he can. 

The politician tells his adherents of all he has done for the peo- 
ple and of all he will do for his friends if they will only send him 
back to Washington. And then his friends go out and peddle the 
lie and the near-lie. They forget the other Senators and the mem- 
bers of the House and what these have done for the state of Cali- 
fornia. By magnifying that which the Senator did while at the 
capital and elsewhere and by giving the Senator credit for the things 
his associates in Congress have done an attempt is made to stampede 
the public into voting for the gentleman who must eat and because 
he must eat must have office. 

Speaking of offices and office holding, did you ever reflect upon 
this? What an appetite for more office that office holding gives 
the politician? The Senator has come back from a very interesting 
session of the national legislature, from profitable professional work 
in New York city, and he has convinced himself there is no such 
man as Hiram Johnson to be found anywhere in the wide world, no 
man with the great mental grasp of Hiram, no man with the vast 
physical grasp as Johnson, no man with the wonderful understand- 
ing of men and things as Senator Johnson and that, because of 
these incontrovertible facts, Senator Johnson is the choice of Hiram 
Johnson for the job of succeeding Hiram Johnson in office. Just 
think of the favor rendered the voters of the state of California 
by this wonderful man. By selecting himself for the office of United 
States Senator he has saved the voters and politicians of his state 
a lot of work and worry and he has made the best possible selection 
to be made under the circumstances. 

No man and no woman can possibly know as well as does Sena- 
tor Johnson that Hiram Johnson is a good successor to Senator 
Johnson in that office, so why burden the people with any useless 
effort in the direction of the selection of a Senator? 

What a habit it is to have acquired to be able to suck sus- 
tenance from public office, ^hat is more agreeable than this sweet 
tasting political pap and why not continue the practice ad infinitum? 
It is never ad nauseum in politics. And now that our pudgy Sena- 
tor has got used to the diet why should we change Senators? Why 
subject a stranger, although recognized as a very able man, to the 
possible troubles which might be found in a complete change of diet? 
Why go after strange gods when the god we have set up takes io 
professional eternal office holding so naturally and so fittingly? 

It has been charged that Senator Johnson has changed his politi- 
cal views and that many of his erstwhile admirers have not change;! 
with him. That charge is a \ery foolish one to make against the 



Senator. Did he not have opportunities, close at hand, to study 
conditions, opportunities which, under the circumstances, the voters 
have not had and could not have had? What can the voter know 
about Mr. Hearst and his wonderful ideas for the regeneration of 
the whole world? How can the voters know anything about this? 

Senator Johnson knows all about these things because undoubtedly 
Mr. Hearst has told him all about his ambitions, while he was con- 
sulting him in a legal way about taking charge of certain things 
in New York. There are many things Mr. Hearst might have told 
Senator Johnson and why should it be assumed by anyone that the 
voter knows what the modest Mr. Hearst may have told the Sena- 
tor? Whatever he did tell him was for the Senator's ear alone and 
is no business of the public, anyway, except if the Senator, in his 
magnanimous discretion, sees fit to let the public in on his secrets 
with the great publisher. 

A great protest should arise in California at the way Senator 
Johnson has been treated by his political opponents. He comes back 
here flushed with the proud consciousness of things achieved for 
the people and a section of that people fires questions at him, try- 
ing to force him to answer questions which have really nothing to 
do with the case. Whose business is it but his own if he has had 
private dealings with Mr. Hearst? Whose business is it anyway if 
he has made a few thousands in legal or other fees, while he has 
been away working so unremittingly for the ungrateful questioners? 

And, above all things, why shouldn't he, having acquired the habit, 
be continued in public office? No one can conceive of any other 
more fitting place for Mr. Hiram Johnson than being in a public 
office, and on public pay, and Mr. Johnson agrees with everybody 
else, who have a grain of sense, that keeping him in public office 
is a public duty. Can anybody advance a single good reason why, 
being used to it and not being really fit for anything else, the Sen- 
ate should be deprived of so bright an ornament? 

There is one great compelling reason why we should elect Hiram 
Johnson as Senator and this should never be lost sight of in the 
hectic trend of a political campaign. That great compelling factor 
is found in the lack of time found in Washington to really come 
forward and take the lead in national affairs. Everyone having the 
welfare of the state at heart, anyone in whom throbs the spark of pa- 
triotism, anyone having a capacity for looking into the future, must 
admit that Hiram Johnson exhibited his rare good judgment when 
he selected himself as a possible future candidate for the presidency 
of the United States. It is possible that he has whispered this am- 
bition into the pendant ear of his publisher patron and that this 
always modert individual has, in a spirit of patriotism and self- 
effacement, consented to step aside and let the Senator take the 
presidential chair, at some time in the future, and that Mr. Hearst 
will be satisfied to show his admiration and his endorsement of 
what the people may do by standing back of the chief executive's 
chair and wave the flies off the occupant's dome with a peacock 
feather fan. In order to make this Hearst-Johnsonian dream a real 
thing we should all stand up and wave our hats in the air and ap- 
plaud all of the things that have been done in Congress during the 
incumbency of Senator Johnson, as the things Senator Johnson did. 
regardless of the envious disclaimers advanced by his brother office 
holders. It Is a great thing to be great and know it. Many men have 
been great men but, unfortunately for them, they did not have the 
knowledge of this fact and it was left for posterity to brand their 
pedestals in the hall of fame with the glorious story. How much 
better to do the branding yourself and know it has been well done. 



8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 26, 1922 



ive Y©m Heard ^ c 



lui ir 

An American came to London with the best introductions to a 
great legal dignitary, who received him affably, and, finding he 
wanted to meet certain Englishmen of high position in finance and 
diplomacy, arranged a dinner to which all these distinguished men 
were bidden. The dinner was to be held in ten days — on a Wed- 
nesday. Meanwhile, the American slipped over to Paris. 

The night of the dinner came. The guests arrived in ribbons 
and Orders. At last came the American guest — in a check suit of 
pronounced pattern. Dinner over, the host introduced the American 
visitor in one of his best speeches. The American rose to respond. 
But before making his real speech he asked to be allowed to say a 
few words about his clothes, on which he had, so he said, heard 
audible comments in the course of the evening. 

"The fact is," he went on, "that 1 returned to London on Mon- 
day morning. There had been a mishap to my luggage, and my 
evening clothes were ruined. I went to a tailor to obtain a suit of 
evening clothes to wear this evening. 'It can't be done,' he said. 
'But I must have them,' I replied. 'There is only one thing for you 
to do,' he then told me. 'You must go to Clarkson, the costumier. 
He can help you.' 

"Well, gentlemen, I went to Clarkson and told him the fix I was 
in. To my dismay, Clarkson said he couldn't help me. All his stock 
of evening clothes had been hired out — because our host of the 
evening was giving a dinner party." 

* * * 

A Chinaman was brought before a very peppery magistrate 
charged with furiously driving his horse along the street. He was 
fined $10. The man could speak and read English quite well, but 
on hearing his sentence he put on an absolutely vacant expression 
and professed complete ignorance of what the the magistrate meant, 
repeating over and over again, " No savee, no savee." The magis- 
trate, getting purple in the face with rage after repeating the sen- 
tence several times, suggested that the "damned Celestial" should 
be locked up until he paid, when a voice from the back of the 
court was heard asking to be allowed to interpret it to him. The 
magistrate, only too glad to see the last of the Chinese, said, "By 
all means come forward." A young man stepped up to the China- 
man and said with a very serious air, "John, the magistrate says 
you are to pay fifty dollars." "Oh, no, no, no, ten dollars, ten dol- 
lars," shrieked the Chinaman, fetching the money out of his pocket 
in double-quick time. 

The income tax commissioners wrote to a certain gentleman point- 
ing out that they were not satisfied with the amount he had set 
down as his income. His reply expressed cordial agreement. "Dear 
Sirs," he wrote, "You are not half so dissatisfied as I am. Yours, etc." 

Taking a Warning. — Learning that his wife was at a moving pic- 
ture performance with another man, Smith rushed to the theater and 
appealed to the manager for assistance. The latter, being quite a 
diplomat, came upon the stage and made the following announce- 
ment: 

'There is present in this audience a man with somebody else's wife. 
I desire to avoid scandal and will permit this couple to leave quietly 
when the theater is darkened." 

The lights were put out. Fifteen couples left the theater. 

Doctor — With care your husband will recover in a week. You 
don't seem very pleased! 

Wife — You told me he would die a week ago — and I have sold 
his clothes! — Klods Hans (Copenhagen). 



Little Edward, aged three, could not remember that his evening 
meal was supper and the morning meal was breakfast. His father, 
trying to teach him, asked one evening, "Son, what meal did you 
eat this morning?" 

"Oatmeal, Daddy." 

"The house I have moved into is by the railway." 

"Doesn't that disturb your sleep?" 

"No. They say that I can get used to it in a few nights, and so 
for the first week or so I am sleeping in a hotel." — Kasper (Stock- 
holm). 

"Whew! That licking I gave you tired me all out." 
"Yes, but you c'n sit down an' rest." 



iroclfrr)ni,[ , Va;^eo- 



linen in novel Par 
Handkerchiefs fro 
colors to match. 



purest 
[tired designs. 



D. C. Heger 

MAKER OF EXCLUSIVE SHIRTS 

NECKWEAR - UNDERWEAR - PAJAMAS - ROBES 



San Francisco K5p«3>) Los Angeles 
116-11S Kearny Street INy%J 407 W. Seventh Street 




F. Solari-Cahen's 

Restaurant 

1 9 Union Square Avenue 

off Kearny Street, Opposite Chronicle Bldg. 

ENLARGED AND REFURNISHED 

Just a Little Better QUALITY FOOD SERVICE 
Private Booths 



Open Until 10 P. M. 



Phone Sutter 8600 



F. Solari-Cahen's 



August 26, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



Running A Steamship Company 

THE GREAT war induced peopie to believe successful importers 
and exporters could be made in a night. These became as 
plentiful as mushrooms and lasted about as long as these fungi 
usually do last. About the same reason, which caused people to 
believe others could become experts in any business because they 
had an idea or a few ideas which were believed of the money-mak- 
ing kind, induced other men to believe that successful operators 
of steamship companies were born over night. 

And a large number of men engaged in the operation of steam- 
ships over the Seven Seas. A very few of these have remained in 
that business, now the war is over. Those who believed great ship- 
ping men were created by thinking about it and by entering into 
all kinds of speculations were eventually weeded out, just as the 
exporter and importer commodity gambler was eliminated. 

Running a steamship company demands special training. No 
matter how good a business man he may be the man who has had 
no training along traffic lines on land and sea is usually a flat fail- 
ure as a manager of a big line of steamships. That man must have 
not only the technical and business knowledge attaching itself to 
ships themselves, but he must be an all around keen business man 
along many other lines. 

The manager of a steamship company, in order to be successful, 
must have in addition rigid principles, he must be honest and he 
must be impartial. He must be as honest in his dealings with his 
personnel as he is in the deals he carries on with those who pat- 
ronize his line. 

There have been examples of men who have had meteoric ca- 
reers in the steamship business who were notoriously crooked in 
their ideas and who possessed no ideals, but the successes taken from 
that type of men are very few and far between. 

The experience of the Shipping Board in allocating vessels to 
men who formed companies for the operation of steamship lines 
who either had no knowledge at all of the shipping business pre- 
viously or who, having that knowledge, were crooked in addition 
is a very sad one to contemplate. With every advantage it was 
possible to give such managements many have failed. Some have 
changed from managements and have become merely brokerage 
firms, handling affairs for the Shipping Board. 

The process of eliminating the bad and the incompetent from 
the business of carrying freight and passengers over the seas is 
still going on and the quicker these impediments to trade are re- 
moved the better it will be, not only for the survivors who are fit 
to survive, but for all of us who are concerned in the establishment 
of the American merchant marine as one of the big factors in na- 
tional and world development. 



THE FLEET BASE 

The base on the Pacific Coast for the United States navy has 
been located at San Pedro. Many reasons have been assigned for 
this and these reasons apply, with just as much logic, as to any 
other port to be adopted as the base. It looks quite unfair to the rest 
of the state of California, where the climate is just as good as it 
is at San Pedro, and many where the anchorage is better. And, 
casting aside any sort of prejudice in favor of one or another port, 
it must be apparent that if other ports are entitled to the fleet, 
at least part of the time, San Francisco bay, with its big cities, is 
certainly not asking too much if it demands several months' stop 
here during the year of the Pacific naval fleet. In fact there are a 
great many reasons why San Francisco bay should be the home of 
the fleet. Here is an unlimited and safe anchorage and here, too, 
is a market for revictualling the fleet, that cannot be excelled any- 
where. Our merchants should certainly show considerable inter- 
est in this question on that account. And there are other consider- 
ations, too, among which may be mentioned the fact that San Fran- 
cisco, Oakland, Richmond and the numerous surrounding cities and 
towns offer to the officers and men of the fleet a much greater op- 
portunity for pleasure and for profitable use of their mentalities than 
may be found anywhere within easy reach of San Pedro, and the 
officers and men should be given the greatest consideration while 
seeking a home port for the American navy on this coast. This 
is the view of those who claim that San Francisco bay should be 
the home port of the fleet, but there are those who make no ob- 
jection to San Pedro having the fleet part of the time and who ad- 
vance the idea that the fleet might make San Francisco bay its 
port part of the time and make other ports its home at other times. 
One argument advanced by the people who want to keep the fleet 
at San Pedro permanently is that the target practice may be had 
near San Pedro that could not be indulged in near San Francisco. 
That kind of argument does not deserve an answer. It is argument 
based on nothing at all substantial — nothing more substantial than 
the statement itself, unsupported by any evidence whatsoever. 



MONEY TALKS 

When you take her to the movies, or take her to a show. 

Before you get the tickets, why, you must expend some "dough." 

If you get into a party, where freely flows the wino. 

These bootleg days it surely costs a great amount of "Rhino. 

Or if you play the ponies, and pick the one to back. 

Before you pick a winner, you will spend a lot of "Jack. 

If penny ante is your game, which is not very rash. 

You'll find before you finish, that this also calls for "Cash." 

If you bet upon elections, and attempt to say who'll win. 
There's not the slightest doubt that you, will drop a lot of "Tin. 

When you pick out the losing team, and pull a sporting bloomer. 

It's very sad, but you must part from your hard earned "Mazuma. 

But perhaps you may prefer, a Koo Koo Klan to join. 

Well, just before you ride the goat, they ask you for your "Coin. 

Wherever poor dear men may go, this one thought always heckle?. 

That soon or late, you get the gate, and dig up all your "checkels. 

— Charles F. Gallagher. 



WITH A GOOD SLOGAN 

The anti-machine ticket of the Republican County Committee 
has adopted a very good slogan which reads: Oust the wrecking 
gang and put a construction crew on the job. That is about as 
good a platform any party of men could find to stand upon for 
election. The headquarters are at 1026 Market street and those 
who desire to vote right should get a card there which contains the 
names of the candidates endorsed by the Republican County Com- 
mittee. In addition to this endorsement these candidates are en- 
dorsed by a number of other organizations, many of which are 
permanent and identified with other than the political destines of 
the city and county of San Francisco. These civic organizations 
are seventeen in number and are the most representative bodies of 
the city. The telephone number of the committee is Market 2323. 
If you want a card just telephone. 



— An Indiana man is reported as having been successful with the 
management of three households in each of which he had a wife 
and some children. This went on for several years. That man should 
have some kind of a reward instead of being hauled before the courts 
to show why he should not be punished. He has done what most 
men find it impossible to do with but one wife. 



■ — Now the flipper is the foil for the flapper and he lets his hair 
grow into a bob. The flapper is supposed to have just a little sense 
and the difference between the flipper and the flapper is that the 
flipper has no sense at all. The cake eater is passee. 



— If the acme of pulchritude is to be seen naked then certainly 
San Francisco is a city of beautiful women. If you do not believe 
this look at the pictures exhibited daily in our newspapers. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 26, 1922 




Hcart&iGjertlfotbrifenliriUaiT' 
'doe thstwilJpLy tiedeviljir. vitbpa 



— An illicit still in Golden Gate Park is the newest development 
in the war being made against bootleggers by the prohibition en- 
forcement officers and the police. This time, however, neither of 
these lay credit to having discovered the still. It was found by a 
boy, the twelve-year-old son of Capt. Charles Goff of the Southern 
police station, while playing detective. There is no telling what 
the youth may do in that line when he stops "playing" at it. 

— And now, among all the rest of them, so numerous they are 
certainly hard to remember, San Francisco has a movie convention. 
The movie people from all over Northern California and some from 
elsewhere will attend. We will say this much about the movie pro- 
ducers of Northern California, which may or may not be distinctive 
and singular, they are quite a respectable and efficient lot. 
* * * 

— The news that the railroad up Mount Tamalpais is to be aban- 
doned and that the road is to be turned into an automobile toll 
road may be taken for granted as untrue. What would become of 
of the thousands who want to go up the mountain and do not own 
automobiles? If the railroad was properly advertised the equip- 
ment of the road could not carry all the people to go to the top of 
Tamalpais. 

¥ * * 

— They are calling in an issue of infalsificable money in Mexico 
and burning it as it is received, as a surtax on imports. Investi- 
gation having been made, it was shown that more money was burned 
than ever had been issued and there is still fifty millions of the money 
in circulation. They have financial geniuses in Mexico as well as 
in Nebraska. 

* * * 

— The way to end a strike is to end it and the best way to end 
is to make it perfectly plain to the strikers that, their contentions 
being manifestly unjust, they will have no relief. The thanks of 
the nation should be extended to the officials of the Santa Fe rail- 
road and to the other officials who have stood their ground so brave- 
ly in this strike. 

* * * 

— Solicitors for advertisements and for donations for the disabled 
veterans of the war should be very carefully investigated by those 
to whom they apply. Uncle Sam is perfectly well able and is 
willing and does take care of his disabled soldiers and there seems 
no good reason why these able assistants to Uncle Sam should 
thrive on public charity. 

* * * 

—It is to laugh. Rodolph Valentino racing eastward as fast as 
steam can carry him. to bid his over-the-border bride farewell before 
she leaves for an European trip, equipped with false beard making 
him look like a bolshevik delegate is the kind of news making life 
bearable these dull summer days. Wonder if he'll wear the same 
spinnage on the way back? 

* * * 

— The German mark is now quoted at ten for 1 cent of real 
money. The German manufacturer, who pays Hans and Gretchen 
with the paper mark and sells to the stranger through export trade 
for real money is doing well, thank you. We cannot tell you when 
Hans and Gretchen will finally tumble to the game, but it is ex- 
pected that someday they will tumble. 



The G Hew Society ^lue Book 



Wish to announce that they are now 
making ready for press. This book 
will contain the names and addresses, 
phones, etc., of the most prominent 
families in San Francisco, Alameda 
County. IMarin County, San Mateo 
County, etc. Also men and women's 
clubs of high social standing. 



For Reservations and Addresses, communicate with 
Marguerite M. Pinchard, Publisher 

165!) Mason St. San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Franklin 6912 

Subscript ion Price $6.00 Per Year 




In Buying Realty, Be 
Sure of Your Title to 
Your New Investment 

— if you are buying a house for a home, 

— if you are lending money secured by mortgage, 

— if you are acquiring real property on which to build, 
obtain Title Insurance from 

California Pacific Title 
Insurance Company 

148 Montgomery Street San Francisco 

Redwood City, San Mateo Co. 

Our Policies of Title Insurance insure the purchaser against 
loss or damage, which he may sustain by reason of defects 
in the title to the land he buys. 




Pasteurized 



Modesto 
Creamery 
&<o€fo*»>A m Butter 

O" REGISTCREO 

Churned Dally al Modesto 



The Old-Established Brand, now being Distributed by 

FRED L. HILMER CO. 

Davis and Sacramento Sts. 

Beware of Imitations. Afk your grocer. Insist 
upon the Original Modesto Creamery Brand 



August 26, 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



II 



Sunbeams 

Mike and Ike ordered fish. The waiter 
brought a platter containing one big fish and 
one little one. Mike served and gave Ike the 
little fish, keeping the big one for himself. 

"You ain't got no manners, Mike." 

"What d'ye mean, I ain't got no man- 
ners?" Mike retorted. 

"Well," said Ike, "if I was serving, I'd give 
you the big fish and keep the little one for 
myself." 

"Well," Mike repied, "what are you talk- 
ing about? Didn't you get it?" 



"I'm leaving today, mum." 

"But you've only been here a week, 
Bridget. What's the matter?" 

"It's downright deceit, mum. Yesterday you 
gave me the keys of the cupboard and trunks, 
and of your jewel case — as nice as anything 
you was about it — and — and — there's not 
one of them fits what you said they fitted." 



The Visitor (to police officer in charge) : 
I say, could you let me see the man you've 
got locked up for breaking into my place last 
night? 

The Police Officer: What do you wish to 
see him about, sir? 

The Visitor: I want to know how in blazes 
he got into the house without waking my 
wife! 



Visitor: I would like to get you to teach 
me to sail a boat. 

Boatman: Sail a boat! Why, it's as easy 
as swimmin'. Jest grasp the main sheet with 
one hand, an' the tiller with the other, an' if 
a squall strikes, ease up or bring 'er to, an' 
loose the halyards, but look out fer the gaff 
an' boom, or the hull thing'll be in the 
water, an' ye'll be upset; but if the wind is 
steady y'r all right, onless y'r too slow in 
luffin*, 'cause then ye'll be upset sure. Jump 
right in and try it; but, remember, whatever 
ye do, don't gibe! — Pearson's (London). 



"A bunch of White Caps went over beyond 
Mount Pizgy tuther night and drug a feller 
out of bed that was suspected of making 
bone-dry licker and whipped him," related 
Gap Johnson of Rumpus Ridge. 

"Did they find any licker?" interestedly 
asked an acquaintance. 

"Mighty little. They drunk up what there 
was and then whaled him for having scarcely 
enough to go once around." — Kansas City 
Star. 



Will — I've found a wonderful dentist. 
Everytime he extracts a tooth he gives his 
patient a drink to stimulate him. 

Joe — Then what are you so gloomy about ; 
did he run out of hootch? 

"No; I ran out of teeth." — Houston Post. 



Wife (introducing ailing husband) — I 
dunno what's the matter with him, doctor, 
but I think he must have got hold of some 
of that good-natured alcohol. — New York 
World. 



Have you consulted your wife, your child- 
ren, your relatives, your friends, your busi- 
ness associates, your almanac, your reference 
library, your monthly magazine, your trade 
reports, your pocketbook, your banker, your 
lawyer, your doctor, your architect? You 
have, and you are still going to build? Then 
step forward and take either the fool's cap. 
or the Carnegie medal. We don't know which 
you deserve. 



"I never knew till I got a car," said Bishop 
Eighty, "that profanity was so prevalent." 
"Do you hear much of it on the road?" 
"Why," said the Bishop, "nearly every- 
body I bump into swears dreadfully." — 
Philadelphia Inquirer. 



LEE S. DOLSON CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



"Pa, could you let me have five dollars?" 
"What for, now?" 

"I want to celebrate father and son week." 
-Detroit Free Press. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Quality 1866—56 Years— 1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burlingame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works : 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 




Electric Cooking 
is Easier Work 

Electric cookery, through the scienti- 
fically-heated, thick-walled ovens that 
are characteristic of Electric Ranges, 
has banished the frequent basting and 
constant attention that haveal ways been 
drawbacks to roasting poultry and meat. 

o^sA your local P G and E of- 
fice for further information. 

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 



PG 



.and 




'PACIFIC SERVICE" 



P-O 3:4-9 E 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 26, 1922 




ociot 




5fer- 



Busy Cupid 

AT A TEA given Saturday at her home 
in Green street formal announcement 
was made of the engagement of Miss Helen 
Lichtenberg to Mr. Abner Doble, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. William Doble of this city. 
The mairiage will unite two of the old Cali- 
fornia families. The future bride is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lichten- 
berg and granddaughter of the late Joseph 
Fredericks. She is a cousin of Mrs. Alfred 
Dubois, Mrs. Gustavus Ziel, Mrs. Harry 
Johnson and Miss Marie Lichtenberg of San 
Rafael. Mr. Doble's grandfather, William 
Doble Sr., came to California in early days 
and the family has since held a prominent 
position. Young Mr. Doble has made a name 
for himself as an inventor. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Emile de Surville have 
arrived from West Virginia and are at the 
Fairmont, where they will make their home. 
Their marriage took place July 26 at the 
home of the bride in Sistersville a few days 
after the arrival of Mr. de Surville. The 
wedding plans were changed on account of 
the death of the bride's mother, Mrs. Arthur 
Sutherland, and the ceremony was quietly 
performed with only relatives and a few 
close friends there. 

— Miss Elizabeth Schmiedell, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. Schmiedell, has 
chosen September 13 as the date of her 
marriage to James Moffitt. The wedding 
will take place in Ross at 4 o'clock in the 
afternoon and will be followed by a recep- 
tion, at the Schmiedell country home. 

— Miss Barbara Stettheimer, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Stettheimer, will 
be married on Sunday afternoon to Julius 
Ochs Alder, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. 
Alder of Chattanooga, Tenn. The engage- 
ment was announced last winter. Miss Stett- 
heimer is the oldest daughter of the family. 




Under the guidance of R. H. Collins 
and his associates, the Peerless was 
bound to be a better and better Peer- 
less. The public response came quick- 
ly and is indicated by augmented sales 
in old Peerless strongholds and 
throughout the country in general. 

Pioneer Motor Company 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

1900 Van Ness Ave., Corner Washington St. 

Telephone Prospect 8800 



She graduated from Stanford after complet- 
ing a preparatory school. She is a pretty 
girl with a charming personality and a way 
of doing well all that she does. She excelled 
in all of the sports. To celebrate the arrival 
of Miss Stettheimer's fiance from the East, 
Mr. and Mrs. Stettheimer gave a gala dinner 
dance Tuesday night at their home in Wood- 
side to entertain the bridal party and a few 
ether friends. Alder is treasurer and vice 
president of the New York Times. Accom- 
panied by his aunt, Miss Mannie Ochs, Mr. 
Alder arrived from New York Tuesday. 
Adolph Ochs, president of the New York 
Times, and uncle of Mr. Alder arrived Wed- 
nesday for Sunday's nuptials. 

— The wedding of Miss Laura Lindsay 
Miller and John Knox will take place at 
St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Oakland on 
Tuesday evening, September 5. The cere- 
mony will be followed bv a reception to be 
held at the Harrv East Miller home in Pied- 
mont. Miss Miller has chosen Mrs. Mon- 
roe Greenwood, formerly Miss Virginia 
Smith, for her matron of honor. There are 
to b° eight bridesmaids, amonq whom there 
are four "Elizabeths" — Miss Elizabeth Ma- 
see, Miss Elizabeth Bliss, Miss Elizabeth 
Watt and Miss Elizabeth Moore. The others 
pre Miss Hatherly Brittain, Miss Margaret 
Ruckbe». Miss Claire Knight and Miss Janet 
Knox. Rclland Moore is to be best man and 
the ushers will be Atherton Evre, Monroe 
Greenwood, Thomas Birbeck. Richard Grif- 
fith, Waite Stevenson, Jack Boyden, Russell 
Macdonald and Baltzer Peterson. 
Luncheons 

— Mrs. Edith Blanding Coleman and Miss 
Lena Blanding gave a luncheon at the Fair- 
mont Hotel Monday in honor of Mrs. Charles 
B. Alexander. Covers were placed for Mrs. 
Frederick Sharon, Mrs. Peter McBean, Mrs. 
George Harrv Mendell Jr., Mrs. James L. 
Flood, Mrs. Louis Monteagle, Mrs. Osgood 
Hooker, Mrs. William Sproule, Mrs. James 
W. Keeney, Mrs. Jerome Politzer, Mrs. 
Louis Parrott, Mrs. Edward Eyre, Mrs. Henry 
Crocker. Miss Cora Jane Flood, Miss Flora 
Low. Miss Laura McKinstry and Miss Elea- 
nor Morgan. 

— Mrs. Perry Cumberson gave a luncheon 
on Friday at the Menlo Park Country Club 
and entertained twelve guests. Mrs. Frank 
King also gave a luncheon at the club on 
Fridav. 

— One of the elaborate luncheons of the 
season was given Tuesday in the parlor of 
the Palace Hotel when Mrs. Frederick W. 
Sharon entertained a large company in honor 
of Mrs. Charles B. Alexander of New York. 
Thirty guests were bidden to the affair. 

— Mrs. James Flood entertained for Mrs. 
Charles B. Alexander at her home in Menlo 
Park Wednesday, and Thursday afternoon 
Mrs. Russell J. Wilson gave a luncheon for 



the visitor from New York at her home in 
Burlingame. Mrs. George Cadwallader, her 
daughter, assisted Mrs. Wilson in doing the 
honors of the occasion. 

— Mrs. John H. Williams gave a luncheon 
Monday at her home in Filbert street for 
Mrs. Homer S. Cummings and her sister. 
Miss Owings of Stamford, Conn. Mrs. Cum- 
mings was here two years ago with her hus- 
band, who was a chairman of the Demo- 
cratic convention. 

— Miss Doris Crane, who was married 

Wednesday to Victor Maxwell, was the motif 

Tuesday for a luncheon given by Mrs. Chris- 

r Trowbridge Jr., who was her matron 

of honor. 

— Mrs. Dutro Cale presided at a hand- 
somely appointed luncheon Wednesday, when 
she entertained a large group of friends. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cale will leave the latter part of 
the week for New York, where they will 
make their permanent home. 

— Mrs. Edwin L. Forster gave a hand- 
somely appointed luncheon on Saturday in 
the Venetian room at the Fairmont, her 
honor guest being Mrs. W. W. Henry Sr., 
mother of Dr. Aurelia Henry Reinhardt, who 
is at present touring Europe. 

— The Hotel St. Francis was the rendez- 
vous for many of the country club women 
Monday, where the usual Monday gathering 
of informal parties filled the two dining 
rooms. Mrs. Thomas Eastland had half a 
dozen guests, Mrs. Walter G. Filer had sev- 
eral friends with her, Mrs. Sydney A. Cloman 
had Miss Jennie Hooker and Miss Jennie 
Blair. Mrs. Walter S. Martin was hostess 
to a few friends. 

— Duci de Kerekjarto and Don Pablo 
Sanchez, City of Mexico, were guests last 
Saturday of Mrs. John Kahn of Los An- 
geles at a luncheon in the Fairmont Hotel. 
Mrs. Kahn, accompanied by her charming 
daughter, is at present visiting this city and 
will remain in San Francisco only a few days. 
Teas 

— Mrs. Wallace I. Terry gave a bridge 
tea Thursday afternoon. The affair was held 
at the Fairmont Hotel. 

—Miss Maye Colburn gave a tea Mon- 
day afternoon at the Fairmont for Mrs. Sam- 
uel G. Murphy of New York and her step- 
daughter, Mrs. John Biddle of Washington. 






ADAMS GOLF CO. 

Specializing 

in 

Golf Instruction 

EXPERT INSTRUCTOR AND CLUB 
MAKER IN ATTENDANCE 



DEPENDABLE SERVICE 



54 Kearny 



Phone Douglas 7838 



August 26. 1922 



AND TAXPAYERS' WEEKLY 



13 



A dozen guests were invited to meet the 
visitors. 

— Mrs. Clarence Grange gave a Mah 
Jongg at the Hotel St. Francis Monday aft- 
ernoon in honor of Miss Grace Heathcote, 
whose engagement to Thomas Randall was 
recently announced. 

Dinners 

— Mr. Rudolph Spreckels gave a dinner 
Saturday night at Burlingame for Mrs. 
P. A. B. Widener and Mrs. Albert Pancoast 
of Philadelphia. He also entertained the 
Easterners at luncheon at the St. Francis 
Monday. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Rutherford 
gave a dinner party Friday night at their 
home on Broadway. 

— General and Mrs. Charles G. Morton 
were the guests of honor at a dinner party 
given Tuesday evening by Colonel and Mrs. 
Francis Koester at their quarters at the Pre- 
sidio. Other guests were Colonel and Mrs. 
John B. McDonald, Colonel and Mrs. Lucius 
H. Holbrook and Major and Mrs. Campbell. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Osgood Hooker gave a 
dinner party recently for Count and Countess 
Andre de Limur. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lee Woolwine 
were the principal guests at a dinner given 
Sunday evening by Mrs. Eleanor Martin. 

— With the return of Hotel Richelieu 
guests from summer outings a great many 
are entertaining for their friends. Mr. and 
Mrs. Max Charles gave a dinner on Tues- 
day for New York guests. Among other din- 
ners given were those of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Heller, Mrs. Lillian Kowalsky, Mrs. E. W. 
Stevens, Mr. and Mrs. A. Lehman, Dr. A. 
Jacobs, Mrs. S. S. Kahn, Mrs. B. W. Ep- 
stein and Mr. M. Silverman. 

— The special feature of the banquets dur- 
ing the past week at Hotel Richelieu was 
the two days' convention, business meeting 
and banquets held on August 18 and 19 by 
the California State Automobile Association, 
who met for a conference of department 
heads and district managers to discuss plans 
for the coming year. The affair was well at- 
tended and both the ball room and Pergola 
court were used for the occasion. 

In Town and Out 

— Mr. and Mrs. Wakefield Baker and their 
little son are spending this month in San 
Rafael where they are the guests of the Mrs. 
Baker's father. Frank D. Madison. 

— Mrs. William G. Drum and her children. 
Miss Miriam and Master Guerin Drum, have 
gone to Burlingame to enjoy a visit of sev- 
eral days with Mr. and Mrs. William Geer 
Hitchcock. 

— Miss Mary Julia Crocker and Miss 
Aileen Mcintosh returned on Sunday even- 
ing from Santa Barbara, where they had been 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Mcintosh for 
the past week or so. 



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— Mrs. Joseph D. Grant and the Misses 
Josephine and Edith Grant returned Monday 
from Pebble Beach, where they passed the 
week end. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Tevis have con- 
cluded a visit in Montecito, where they have 
been for the past fortnight, and they have 
returned to their home in Los Angeles. 

— Walter McGavin left Monday for Paso 
Robles, where he will remain for three weeks. 

— Dr. and Mrs. John Cabot are interest- 
ing visitors from Boston, who are being en- 
tertained by their relatives, Dr. and Mrs. 
Philip Brown, and others. 

— George Tallant and John Gamble re- 
turned recently from a motor trip to Lake 
Tahoe and Lake Tallant, and Mr. Gamble 
has gone to his home in Santa Barbara. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Cowan Jackling 
are entertaining Miss Ruth Hobart at their 
home in Woodside. Miss Hobart is recuperat- 
ing from a recent operation for appendicitis. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Barton Bean have re- 
turned to their home in town after a tour 
of several months of the Eastern states and 
Canada. 

— Mrs. Henry Percival Dodge has arrived 
from abroad and is visiting her mother, Mrs. 
Arthur Page Brown, at the home of her 
aunt, Mrs. Daniel T. Murphy, in Burlingame. 
Prior to her marriage in Europe, Mrs. Dodge 
was Miss Agnes Brown. 

Intimations 

— Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Prince Upham 
and their two little daughters, Miss Nancy 
and Miss Lenore Upham, will return to their 
home in Mill Valley the latter part of Oc- 
tober. They have been all summer at Rin- 
con, near Lake Tahoe. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Evan Evans Jr. have 
taken possession of their new home in San 
Rafael where they will reside in the future. 
Since their arrival from Europe, where they 
passed their wedding journey, Mr. and Mrs. 
Evans have been staying at the Hotel Rafael. 

^Mrs. D. M. Linnard and Mrs. Leo J. 
MacLaughlin of Pasadena, who have been 
at the Fairmont for several weeks, left last 
week for New York via Banff, Lake Louise 
and other northern points of interest. Mrs. 
Linnard will join her son, LeRoy Linnard, 
who is taking an extended trip through Eu- 
rope, having reached London on Saturday, 
and they will return home together. 

— Dr. and Mrs. James Eaves are being 
congratulated on the birth of a daughter, 
which occurred Friday. Mrs. Eaves was Miss 
Marion Small of Berkeley. Her marriage 
to Dr. Eaves took place last summer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edgar van Bergen have 
a house in Santa Barbara this summer and 
often entertain their San Francisco friends 
there. Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Dibble were re- 
cently their guests. 

— Miss Dorothy Meyer, subdebutante 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. E. Meyer 
Jr.. who has been at school in the East, will 
enter (he University of California this fall. 

— Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels and her daugh- 
ters. Miss Eleanor and Miss Claudine Spreck- 
els, have arrived in New York from Europe 
and on their arrival in California will go 
directly to Burlingame, where their house 



has been completed during their absence. 
Mr. Spreckels has been spending the sum- 
mer at Burlingame. 

— There was a double christening Satur- 
day at the home of Mrs. Sprague Magruder 
when the two little Kern boys, Eugene Fran- 
cis Kern Jr. and Billy Danforth Kern, sons 
of Mr. and Mrs. Kern, the latter of whom 
was Miss Dorothy Danforth, were named 
with a religious ceremony performed by Rev. 
Gardner, who married Miss Danforth and 
Mr. Kern in 1917. Miss Antoinette Dye, who 
was bridesmaid at the wedding, and Miss 
Kiltie Fletcher were made godmothers of the 
boys and Montgomery Haslett and George 
Gunn godfathers. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Hendrickson Jr. 
are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. 
Schmiedell. Mrs. Hendrickson will be the 
matron of honor at the wedding of Miss 
Betty Schmiedell and James Moffitt Sep- 
tember 30. 



No longer 



need you feel that you should do without 
glasses because they detract from your 
appearance or you fear they will be con- 
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beautiful styles now obtainable, glasses 
can be decidedly becoming. We recom- 
mend the new rimless semi-invisible "Co- 
lonials" as glasses of style, dignity and 
beauty. 

W. D. Fennimore A. R. Fennimore 

J. W. DaviB 



♦ 




San Francisco - 181 Post, 2508 Mission Sts. 
Berkeley - 2106 Shattack Avenue 

Oakland ------ 1221 Broadway 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eyebrows arched and moles, warts and 
superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest Improved multiple needle ma- 
chine. Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

1.13 Geary Street, Suite 723 Whitney Bide. 

Phone Douglas 5232 
Oakland, Suite 434, First Nail. Bank Bids. 

Phone Oakland 2521 



Hotel Del Monte 

Hake Your Reservations 
at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 
Under Management CARL, S. STANLEY 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

• • • • • • 
PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

• • • • • • 
JEWELS In Platinum 

• • • • • • 

REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

• • • • • • 

UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watche* 

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EXPERT 



Repair Work 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 26, 1922 





By P. N. BER1NGER 




PRICE changing in commodities has 
shown relatively small during the last 
two or three weeks and these changes have 
largely cftset one another. The expected and 
predicted changes, in the prices of all kinds 
of building materials have not materialized 
at all and those who are making these pre- 
dictions have nothing that is at all substan- 
tial to base them upon. From all appear- 
ances, on account of the activity that is be- 
ing shown in building, both the business 
structure and the residence, there will be no 
drop in the prices of building materials. 
These have apparently struck a normal and 
that normal looks as if it would maintain, 
despite every effort to make prices tumble. 
Prices cannot tumble on an active purchas- 
ing market. 

Those who have been holding back in 
the matter of building streets and roads, 
which now call for enormous amounts of 
cement, and who have been predicting a fall 
in the price of cement, have not taken two 
things in consideration. One of these is the 
very largely increased use of cement and 
the other the fact that the manufacturing 
of cement has not been very materially in- 
creased. There has been no material drop 
in the price of cement. For the above rea- 
sons, and because the cement making in- 
dustry is one of the most highly organized 
of all industries, no drop may logically be 
expected in this material. Lumber has 
dropped and will probably drop still lo